Unassociated Document
 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
______________
FORM 10-K
______________
(Mark One)
 
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from _______ to _______
Commission file number 1-9516
______________
AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
      
13-3398766
                        
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
(IRS Employer
Identification No.)
 
767 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4700
New York, New York 10153
(Address of principal executive office)(Zip Code)
(212) 702-4300
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
______________
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
 
         
                                                                                                       
     
                                                                                                                     
         
 
Depositary Units Representing Limited Partner Interests
5% Cumulative Pay-in-Kind Redeemable Preferred Units
 
New York Stock Exchange
 
 
Representing Limited Partner Interests
 
New York Stock Exchange
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ¨  No ý
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes ¨  No ý
Note – Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act from their obligations under those Sections.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý  No ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ý
Indicate by a check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated file, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (Check one):
Large Accelerated Filer ¨
Accelerated Filer ý
Non-accelerated Filer ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨  No ý
The aggregate market value of depositary units held by nonaffiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2006, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, based upon the closing price of depositary units on the New York Stock Exchange Composite Tape on such date was $253,019,078.
The number of depositary and preferred units outstanding as of the close of business on March 1, 2007 was 61,856,830 and 11,340,243, respectively.







TABLE OF CONTENTS
       
Page
 
     
   
         
   
PART I
   
 
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
   
   
   
   
   
         
   
PART II
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
         
   
PART III
   
   
   
   
   
   
         
   
PART IV
   
   






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PART I
Item 1. Business
Introduction
American Real Estate Partners, L.P., or AREP, is a master limited partnership formed in Delaware on February 17, 1987. We are a diversified holding company engaged in a variety of businesses including Gaming, Real Estate and Home Fashion. In addition, we invest a portion of our available liquidity in debt and equity securities with a view towards enhancing returns as we continue to assess further acquisitions of operating businesses. Our primary business strategy is to maximize value for our unitholders. We may also seek to acquire additional businesses that are distressed or in out-of-favor industries and will consider divestiture of businesses.
Our general partner is American Property Investors, Inc., or API, a Delaware corporation wholly-owned, through an intermediate subsidiary, by Carl C. Icahn. We own our businesses and conduct our investment activities through a subsidiary limited partnership, American Real Estate Holdings Limited Partnership, or AREH, and its subsidiaries. References to AREP in this annual report on Form 10-K include AREH and its subsidiaries, unless the context otherwise requires.
As of March 1, 2007, affiliates of Mr. Icahn beneficially owned 55,655,382 depositary units representing AREP limited partnership interests, or the depositary units, representing approximately 90.0% of the outstanding depositary units, and 9,813,346 cumulative pay-in-kind redeemable preferred units, representing AREP limited partnership interests, or the preferred units, representing approximately 86.5% of the outstanding preferred units. See Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management.
Business Strategy
We believe that our core strengths include:
·
operating and investing in our core businesses;
·
increasing value through management, financial or other operational changes;
·
identifying and acquiring undervalued assets and businesses, often through the purchase of distressed securities;
·
managing complex legal, regulatory or financial issues which may include bankruptcy or insolvency; and
·
realizing significant returns on assets.
Our business strategy includes the following:
Enhance Value of Existing Businesses. We continually evaluate our operating businesses with a view to maximizing their value to us. In each of our businesses, we place senior management with the expertise to run their businesses and give them operating objectives that they must achieve. We may make additional investments in a business segment to improve the performance of their operations.
Invest Capital to Grow Existing Operations or Add New Operating Platforms. Our management team has extensive experience in identifying, acquiring and developing undervalued businesses or assets. We may look to make acquisitions of assets or operations that complement our existing operations. We also may look to add new operating platforms by acquiring businesses or assets directly or establishing an ownership position through the purchase of debt or equity securities of troubled entities and may then negotiate for the ownership or effective control of their assets.
Enhance Returns on Assets. We continually look for opportunities to enhance returns on both liquid and operating assets. We may seek to unlock value by selling all or a part of a business segment.


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Key Company Developments
Background
In furtherance of our strategy, we assembled our oil and gas operations in a number of acquisitions beginning in 2001, including significant acquisitions in 2005 and smaller add-on acquisitions in 2006.
In May 2006, we enhanced the value of our Atlantic City gaming operations by acquiring additional land adjacent to The Sands Hotel and Casino, which was operated by our majority-owned subsidiary, Atlantic Coast Entertainment Holdings, Inc. In connection with the Atlantic City acquisition we also acquired the Aquarius Hotel and Casino in Laughlin, Nevada.
During the fourth quarter of 2006, we completed the sales of our oil and gas operations and our Atlantic City gaming operations. These sales resulted in a gain of approximately $663.7 million.
Sale of Atlantic City Gaming Operations
On November 17, 2006, our indirect majority-owned subsidiary, Atlantic Coast Entertainment Holdings, Inc., or Atlantic Coast, ACE Gaming LLC, or ACE, a New Jersey limited liability company and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Atlantic Coast which owns The Sands Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, AREH, and certain other entities owned by or affiliated with AREH completed the sale to Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. of the outstanding membership interests in ACE and 100% of the equity interests in certain subsidiaries of AREH which owned parcels of real estate adjacent to The Sands, including 7.7 acres of land adjacent to The Sands known as the Traymore site. The aggregate price was approximately $274.8 million, of which approximately $200.6 million was paid to Atlantic Coast and approximately $74.2 million was paid to affiliates of AREH for subsidiaries which owned the Traymore site and the adjacent properties. $50.0 million of the purchase price paid to Atlantic Coast was deposited into escrow pending satisfaction of certain conditions, including the resolution of claims by certain creditors of GB Holdings, Inc., or GBH. On February 22, 2007, we resolved these claims. All issues relating to GBH have now been resolved. See Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Sale of Oil and Gas Operations
On November 21, 2006, we sold all of the issued and outstanding membership interests of our indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, NEG Oil & Gas LLC, or NEG Oil & Gas, to SandRidge Energy, Inc., formerly Riata Energy, Inc., for consideration consisting of $1.025 billion in cash, 12,842,000 shares of SandRidge’s common stock, valued at $18 per share at the date of closing, and the repayment by SandRidge of $300.0 million of debt of NEG Oil & Gas. The purchase price is subject to post-closing adjustment based on the amounts of net working capital and cash balances of NEG Oil & Gas.
On November 21, 2006, National Energy Group, Inc., or NEGI, our majority-owned subsidiary, sold its membership interest in NEG Holding LLC to NEG Oil & Gas for approximately $260.8 million. NEG Oil & Gas owned the managing membership interest in NEG Holding LLC, which constituted all of the membership interests in NEG Holding LLC other than those held by NEGI. Of the amount paid to NEGI, $149.6 million was used to repay the NEGI 10.75% senior notes due 2007, including principal and accrued interest, all of which was held by us. We continue to hold a 50.01% interest in NEGI. On February 15, 2007, NEGI paid a one-time cash dividend on its outstanding stock of $3.31 per share, or approximately $37.0 million, approximately $18.5 million of which was paid to us.
Agreement to Acquire Lear Corporation
On February 9, 2007, we entered into an agreement and plan of merger pursuant to which we would acquire Lear Corporation for aggregate consideration of approximately $5.2 billion, including the assumption of debt. Lear is a leading global supplier of automotive interior systems and components with 2006 net sales of $17.8 billion. Lear’s business is focused on providing complete seat systems, electronic products and electrical distribution systems and other products. Our agreement with Lear permits Lear to solicit proposals from other potential purchasers for 45 days after the signing of the agreement, until March 26, 2007, after which Lear may continue discussions with any party that has made a bona fide acquisition proposal and respond to unsolicited acquisition proposals until Lear’s stockholders approve the transaction with us.


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Consummation of the merger is subject to various conditions, including receipt of the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of Lear, antitrust approvals, and other customary closing conditions. Mr. Icahn beneficially owns approximately 15.8% of Lear’s outstanding common stock.
On February 8, 2007, our subsidiary, AREP Car Holdings Corp., entered into a commitment letter with Bank of America, N.A., and Banc of America Securities LLC, pursuant to which Bank of America will act as the initial lender under two senior secured credit facilities in an aggregate principal amount of $3.6 billion, consisting of a $1.0 billion senior secured revolving facility and a $2.6 billion senior secured term loan B facility. The credit facilities, along with cash on hand, are intended to refinance and replace Lear’s existing credit facilities and to fund the transactions contemplated by the merger. We intend to fund approximately $1.4 billion of the purchase price from our cash and cash equivalents and investments. See Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Proposals to Acquire American Railcar and Philip Services
Mr. Icahn has proposed that we acquire his interests in American Railcar, Inc. and Philip Services Corporation. Two committees, one consisting of two independent directors and the other of three independent directors of our board, have been formed to consider the proposals. No agreement has been reached as to price or terms. Any acquisition would be subject to, among other things, the negotiation, execution and closing of a definitive agreement and the receipt of a fairness opinion. American Railcar is a publicly traded company that is primarily engaged in the business of manufacturing covered hoppers and tank railcars. Philip Services is an industrial services company that provides industrial outsourcing, environmental services and metal services to major industry sectors throughout North America.
Possible Refinancing, Recapitalization or Sale of Gaming Operations
In furtherance of our strategy to maximize value for our unitholders and in light of favorable market conditions, we are currently evaluating alternatives for refinancing, recapitalizing or selling our Gaming segment.
Key Financing Developments
ACEP Senior Secured Revolving Credit Facility
Effective May 11, 2006, American Casino & Entertainment Properties LLC, or ACEP, and certain of ACEP’s subsidiaries, as guarantors, entered into an amended and restated credit agreement with Wells Fargo Bank N.A., as syndication agent, Bear Stearns Corporate Lending Inc., as administrative agent, and certain other lender parties, amending and restating the credit agreement entered into in January 2004. Under the amended credit agreement, ACEP’s credit line was increased to up to $60.0 million. ACEP’s obligations under the credit agreement are secured by first liens on substantially all of the assets of ACEP and its subsidiaries and all outstanding amounts will be due and payable on May 10, 2010. As of December 31, 2006, ACEP had outstanding borrowings of $40.0 million with an interest rate of 6.85% per annum. The borrowings were incurred to finance a portion of the purchase price of the Aquarius Casino Resort in Laughlin, Nevada.
WestPoint Home Secured Revolving Credit Agreement
On June 16, 2006, WestPoint Home, Inc., an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of our majority-owned subsidiary, WestPoint International, Inc., or WPI, entered into a $250.0 million loan and security agreement with Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent and lender. Under the five-year agreement, borrowings are subject to a monthly borrowing base calculation and include a $75.0 million sub-limit that may be used for letters of credit. Borrowings under the agreement bear interest, at the election of WestPoint Home, either at the prime rate adjusted by an applicable margin ranging from minus 0.25% to plus 0.50% or LIBOR adjusted by an applicable margin ranging from plus 1.25% to 2.00%. WestPoint Home pays an unused line fee of 0.25% to 0.275%. Obligations under the agreement are secured by WestPoint Home’s receivables, inventory and certain machinery and equipment. As of December 31, 2006, there were no borrowings under the agreement, but there were outstanding letters of credit of approximately $40.1 million.


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New Seabury Real Estate Mortgage
On June 30, 2006, certain of our indirect subsidiaries engaged in property development and associated resort activities entered into a $32.5 million loan agreement with Textron Financial Corp. The loan is secured by a mortgage on our New Seabury golf course and resort in Mashpee, Massachusetts. The loan bears interest at the rate of 7.96% per annum and matures in five years with a balloon payment due of $30.0 million. Annual debt service payments of $3.0 million are required, which are payable in monthly installment amounts based on a 25-year amortization schedule.
AREP Senior Secured Revolving Credit Facility
On August 21, 2006, we and American Real Estate Finance Corp., or AREP Finance, as the borrowers, and certain of our subsidiaries, as guarantors, entered into a credit agreement with Bear Stearns Corporate Lending Inc., as administrative agent, and certain other lender parties. Under the credit agreement, we are permitted to borrow up to $150.0 million, including a $50.0 million sub-limit that may be used for letters of credit. Borrowings under the credit agreement, which are based on our credit rating, bear interest at LIBOR plus 1.0% to 2.0%. We pay an unused line fee of 0.25% to 0.5%. Our obligations are guaranteed by and secured by liens on substantially all of the assets of certain of our indirect wholly-owned holding company subsidiaries. All amounts outstanding under the credit agreement will be due and payable on August 21, 2010. As of December 31, 2006, there were no borrowings under the agreement.
WestPoint International Preferred Stock Purchase
On December 20, 2006, pursuant to a subscription and standby commitment agreement, we purchased from WPI 1,000,000 shares of Series A-1 Preferred Stock and 1,000,000 shares of Series A-2 Preferred Stock, for an aggregate purchase price of $200.0 million. WPI used a portion of the proceeds to acquire manufacturing facilities in Bahrain, creating WestPoint Home (Bahrain) WLL, in furtherance of WPI’s initiatives to provide lower cost manufacturing capability.
AREP Senior Notes Offering
On January 16, 2007, we and AREP Finance issued $500.0 million principal amount of 7 1/8% senior notes due 2013. The notes were issued pursuant to an indenture dated February 7, 2005, among us, as issuer, AREP Finance, as co-issuer, AREH, as Guarantor, and Wilmington Trust Company, as trustee. The notes were issued by us at 99.5% of principal amount or at a 0.5 % discount, and the amount paid to us included accrued interest from August 15, 2006 through the issue date. The notes have a fixed annual interest rate of 7 1/8% per annum, which will be paid every six months on February 15 and August 15 commencing on February 15, 2007. The notes will mature on February 15, 2013.
Gaming
We currently own and operate gaming properties in Las Vegas and Laughlin, Nevada. In May 2006, we acquired the Aquarius Casino Resort, or the Aquarius, in Laughlin, Nevada and, in November 2006, we sold The Sands Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey.
Our four Nevada gaming properties are operated through our wholly-owned subsidiary, American Casino & Entertainment Properties LLC, or ACEP. Our Las Vegas properties are the Stratosphere Casino Hotel & Tower, or the Stratosphere, which is located on the Las Vegas Strip and caters to visitors to Las Vegas, and two off-Strip casinos, Arizona Charlie’s Decatur and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder, which cater primarily to residents of Las Vegas and the surrounding communities. The Stratosphere is one of the most recognized landmarks in Las Vegas and our two Arizona Charlie’s properties are well-known casinos in their respective marketplaces.
Our fourth property is the Aquarius, in Laughlin, Nevada. The Aquarius is the largest hotel in Laughlin. It is located on the Colorado River and caters to tourists seeking a gaming and entertainment destination.
Stratosphere Casino Hotel & Tower.The Stratosphere owns approximately 34 acres located at the northern end of the Las Vegas Strip of which approximately 17 acres is available for development. The Stratosphere operates the tallest free-standing observation tower in the United States and, at 1,149 feet, it is the tallest building west of the


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Mississippi River. The tower includes an award-winning 336-seat revolving restaurant with unparalleled views of Las Vegas, known as the Top of the World, and features the three highest amusement rides in the world.
The Stratosphere’s casino contains approximately 80,000 square feet of gaming space, with approximately 1,300 slot machines, 49 table games, a six table poker room and a race and sports book. Six themed restaurants and six lounges, two of which feature live entertainment, and five of which are located adjacent to the casino. For 2006, 2005 and 2004, approximately 68.2%, 70.7% and 70.6%, respectively, of the Stratosphere’s gaming revenue was generated by slot machine play and 27.3%, 25.9% and 27.4%, respectively, by table games. The Stratosphere derives its other gaming revenue from the poker room and the race and sports book, which primarily are intended to attract customers for slot machines and table games.
The hotel has 2,444 rooms, including 131 suites. The hotel amenities include a 67,000 square foot pool and a recreation area located on the eighth floor which includes a café, cocktail bar, private cabanas and a fitness center. The Beach Club 25, located on the 25th floor, provides a secluded adult pool. During 2006, the Stratosphere refurbished its casino floor, added a high limit gaming area and built a new center bar. The Stratosphere also refurbished approximately 1,700 of its guest rooms during the three years ended December 31, 2006.
The retail center, located on the second floor of the base building, occupies approximately 110,000 square feet of developed retail space and an additional 80,000 square feet of undeveloped space. The retail center contains 43 shops, six of which are food venues, and, in addition, 11 merchant kiosks. Adjacent to the retail center is the 640-seat showroom that currently offers evening shows designed to appeal to value-minded visitors who come to Las Vegas.
Arizona Charlie’s Decatur.Arizona Charlie’s Decatur, a full-service hotel and casino geared toward residents of Las Vegas and surrounding communities, is located on approximately 17 acres four miles west of the Las Vegas Strip in the heavily populated west Las Vegas area. The property is easily accessible from State Route 95, a major highway in Las Vegas.
As of December 31, 2006, Arizona Charlie’s Decatur contained approximately 52,000 square feet of gaming space with 1,400 slot machines, 15 table games, a race and sports book, a 24-hour bingo parlor, a keno lounge and a poker room. Approximately 57.0% of the slot machines at Arizona Charlie’s Decatur are video poker games. Arizona Charlie’s Decatur emphasizes video poker because it is popular with local players and therefore generates high volumes of play and casino revenue. For 2006, 2005 and 2004, approximately 89.7%, 89.3% and 90.0%, respectively, of the property’s gaming revenue was generated by slot machine play and 5.3%, 4.9% and 5.1%, respectively, by table games. Arizona Charlie’s Decatur derives its other gaming revenue from bingo, keno, poker and the race and sports book, which are primarily intended to attract customers for slot machines.
Arizona Charlie’s Decatur currently has 258 rooms, including nine suites. Hotel customers include local residents and their out-of-town guests, as well as those business and leisure travelers who, because of location and cost considerations, choose not to stay on the Las Vegas Strip or at other hotels in Las Vegas. During 2006, Arizona Charlie’s Decatur added an Outback Steakhouse to provide another dining alternative to its current guests as well as to attract new customers.
Arizona Charlie’s Boulder.Arizona Charlie’s Boulder operates a full-service casino, hotel and RV park situated on approximately 24 acres of land located on Boulder Highway, in an established retail and residential neighborhood in the eastern metropolitan area of Las Vegas. The property is easily accessible from I-515, the most heavily traveled east/west highway in Las Vegas.
Arizona Charlie’s Boulder completed renovations to its gaming facilities in June 2006. As of December 31, 2006, the casino contained approximately 47,000 square feet of gaming space, 6,000 of which was added in June 2006, with 1,100 slot machines, 16 table games, a race and sports book and a 24-hour bingo parlor. As of December 31, 2006, 51.0% of the slot machines at Arizona Charlie’s Boulder are video poker games. Arizona Charlie’s Boulder emphasizes video poker because it is popular with local players and, as a result, generates high volumes of play and casino revenue. For 2006, 2005 and 2004, approximately 89.3%, 88.1% and 89.1%, respectively, of gaming revenue was generated by slot machine play and 6.0%, 7.1% and 7.0%, respectively, by table games. Arizona Charlie’s Boulder derives its other gaming revenue from bingo and the race and sports book, which are primarily intended to attract customers for slot machines.


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Arizona Charlie’s Boulder currently has 303 rooms, including 221 suites. Hotel customers include local residents and their out-of-town guests, as well as those business and leisure travelers who, because of location and cost considerations, choose not to stay on the Las Vegas Strip or at other hotels in Las Vegas.
Arizona Charlie’s Boulder also has an RV park. The RV park is one of the largest short-term RV parks on the Boulder Strip with 30- to 70-foot pull through stations and over 200 spaces.
Aquarius Casino Resort.The Aquarius, a full-service hotel and casino, is located on approximately 18 acres of land next to the Colorado River in Laughlin, Nevada and is a tourist-oriented gaming and entertainment destination.
As of December 31, 2006, the Aquarius contained approximately 57,000 square feet of gaming space with approximately 1,100 slot machines, 49 table games, a race and sports book, a keno lounge and a four table poker room. Approximately 31.0% of the slot machines at the Aquarius are video poker games. The Aquarius emphasizes slot play because it is popular with local players and therefore generates high volumes of casino revenue. From the date of acquisition through December 31, 2006, approximately 80.5% of the property’s gaming revenue was generated by slot machine play and 15.5% by table games. The Aquarius derives its other gaming revenue from keno, poker and the race and sports book, which are primarily intended to attract customers for slot machines and tables games.
The Aquarius is the largest hotel in Laughlin, Nevada, with 1,907 hotel rooms, including 90 suites in two
15-story towers. The hotel amenities include seven restaurants, over 35,000 square feet of meeting space and a 3,300 – seat amphitheater. The property features an outdoor pool, fitness center and lighted tennis courts. In 2006 we completed upgrading the casino and plan to refurbish the hotel rooms in 2007 and 2008.
Strategy
In Las Vegas, we target primarily middle-market customers who focus on obtaining value in their gaming, lodging, dining and entertainment experiences. We emphasize the Stratosphere as a destination property for visitors to Las Vegas by offering an attractive experience for the value minded customer. We strive to deliver value to our gaming customers at our Arizona Charlie’s locations by offering payout ratios on our slot and video poker machines that we believe are among the highest payout ratios in Las Vegas. Our Las Vegas management team has improved operating results by repositioning each of our properties to better target their respective markets, expanding and improving our existing facilities, focusing on customer service and implementing a targeted cost reduction program.
The Laughlin market is a value-oriented destination for travelers seeking an alternative to the fast-paced Las Vegas experience. The property targets the mid-high end customer in the Laughlin market seeking value. Since we acquired the Aquarius in May 2006, we have added a breadth of amenities and services in their gaming, lodging, dining and entertainment experiences. The facility has been upgraded with 1,000 new slot machines, a new lobby, a new V.I.P. Check-In, Players Lounge, a refurbished Center Bar and the addition of a patio lounge providing views of the Colorado River. Currently, Outback Steakhouse is developing a restaurant at the site.
Marketing
The Stratosphere utilizes the unique amenities of its tower to attract visitors. Gaming products, hotel rooms, entertainment and food and beverage products are priced to appeal to the value-conscious middle-market Las Vegas visitor. The Top of the World restaurant, however, caters to higher-end customers. The Stratosphere participates in the A.C.E Rewards Club which provides members with cash and/or complimentaries at the casino, which can be used at Arizona Charlie’s Decatur, Arizona Charlie’s Boulder or the Aquarius. Advertising and promotional campaigns are designed to maximize hotel room occupancy, and visits to the tower and to attract and retain players on property.
Arizona Charlie’s Decatur and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder market their hotels and casinos primarily to local residents of Las Vegas and the surrounding communities. We believe that the properties’ pricing and gaming odds make them one of the best values in the market and that their gaming products, hotel rooms, restaurants and other amenities attract local customers in search of reasonable prices, smaller casinos and more attentive service.
We focus our Las Vegas marketing efforts on attracting customers with an affinity for playing slot and video poker machines. Similarly, we have intentionally avoided competing for the attention of high-stakes table game customers.


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The Aquarius focuses its marketing efforts primarily on the mid-high end customer in the Laughlin market. We believe that the property’s new state-of-the-art slot floor, new amenities and liberal A.C.E Rewards Club position the property to target this market segment.
Competition
Investments in the gaming and entertainment industries involve significant competitive pressures and political and regulatory considerations. In recent years, there have been many new gaming establishments opened as well as facility expansions, providing an increased supply of competitive products and properties in the industry, which may adversely affect our operating margins and investment returns. The hotel and casino industry is highly competitive.
Hotels located on or near the Las Vegas Strip compete primarily with other Las Vegas strip hotels and with a few major hotels in downtown Las Vegas. The Stratosphere, which is located on the Las Vegas strip, also competes with a large number of hotels and motels located in or near Las Vegas. The Stratosphere’s tower competes with all other forms of entertainment, recreational activities and other attractions in and near Las Vegas. Arizona Charlie’s Boulder and Arizona Charlie’s Decatur compete with other casinos and other forms of entertainment, which cater to local residents. The Aquarius competes primarily with other Laughlin hotels and casinos located along the Colorado River.
Regulation
Our gaming activities are subject to extensive regulation by authorities in Nevada. Gaming registrations, licenses and approvals, once obtained, can be suspended or revoked for a variety of reasons. To date, our casino properties have obtained all gaming licenses necessary for the operation of their existing gaming operations; however, we cannot assure you that we will obtain any new gaming license or related approval or renewal of an existing license on a timely basis or at all, or that, once obtained, the registrations, findings of suitability, licenses and approvals will not be suspended, conditioned, limited or revoked.
Nevada Gaming Law
The ownership and operation of casino gaming facilities in the State of Nevada are subject to the Nevada Gaming Control Act and the regulations made under such Act, as well as various local ordinances. The gaming operations of our casinos are subject to the licensing and regulatory control of the Nevada Gaming Commission and the Nevada State Gaming Control Board. Our casinos’ operations are also subject to regulation by the Clark County Liquor and Gaming Licensing Board and the City of Las Vegas. These agencies are referred to herein collectively as the Nevada Gaming Authorities.
The laws, regulations and supervisory procedures of the Nevada Gaming Authorities are based upon declarations of public policy. These public policy concerns include, among other things:
·
preventing unsavory or unsuitable persons from being directly or indirectly involved with gaming at any time or in any capacity;
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establishing and maintaining responsible accounting practices and procedures;
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maintaining effective controls over the financial practices of licensees, including establishing minimum procedures for internal fiscal affairs, and safeguarding assets and revenue, providing reliable recordkeeping and requiring the filing of periodic reports with the Nevada Gaming Authorities;
·
preventing cheating and fraudulent practices; and
·
providing a source of state and local revenue through taxation and licensing fees.
Changes in these laws, regulations and procedures could have significant negative effects on our gaming operations and our financial condition and results of operations.


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Owner and Operator Licensing Requirements
Our Nevada casinos are licensed by the Nevada Gaming Authorities as corporate and limited liability company licensees, which we refer to herein as company licensees. Under their gaming licenses, our casinos are required to pay periodic fees and taxes. The gaming licenses are not transferable.
To date, our casino properties have obtained all gaming licenses necessary for the operation of their existing gaming operations; however, gaming licenses and related approvals are privileges under Nevada law, and we cannot assure you that any new gaming license or related approvals that may be required in the future will be granted, or that any existing gaming licenses or related approvals will not be limited, conditioned, suspended or revoked or will be renewed.
Our Registration Requirements
We have been registered by the Nevada Gaming Commission as a publicly traded corporation, which we refer to as a registered company for the purposes of the Nevada Gaming Control Act. API’s parent company, API, AREH, and AREH’s direct and indirect subsidiaries involved in Nevada gaming operations have been registered by the Nevada Gaming Commission as holding companies to the extent required by law.
Periodically, we are required to submit detailed financial and operating reports to the Nevada Gaming Commission and to provide any other information that the Nevada Gaming Commission may require. Substantially all of our material loans, leases, sales of securities and similar financing transactions must be reported to, or approved by, the Nevada Gaming Commission.
Individual Licensing Requirements
No person may become a stockholder or member of, or receive any percentage of the profits of, a non-publicly traded holding or intermediary company or company licensee without first obtaining licenses and approvals from the Nevada Gaming Authorities. The Nevada Gaming Authorities may investigate any individual who has a material relationship to or material involvement with us to determine whether the individual is suitable or should be licensed as a business associate of a gaming licensee. We and certain of our officers, directors and key employees are required to file applications with the Nevada Gaming Authorities and may be required to be licensed or found suitable by the Nevada Gaming Authorities. The Nevada Gaming Authorities may deny an application for licensing for any cause which they deem reasonable. A finding of suitability is comparable to licensing, and both require submission of detailed personal and financial information followed by a thorough investigation. An applicant for licensing or an applicant for a finding of suitability must pay or must cause to be paid all the costs of the investigation. Changes in licensed positions must be reported to the Nevada Gaming Authorities and, in addition to their authority to deny an application for a finding of suitability or licensing, the Nevada Gaming Authorities have the jurisdiction to disapprove a change in a corporate position.
If the Nevada Gaming Authorities were to find an officer, director or key employee unsuitable for licensing or unsuitable to continue having a relationship with us, we would have to sever all relationships with that person. In addition, the Nevada Gaming Commission may require us to terminate the employment of any person who refuses to file appropriate applications. Determinations of suitability or questions pertaining to licensing are not subject to judicial review in Nevada.
Consequences of Violating Gaming Laws
If the Nevada Gaming Commission decides that we have violated the Nevada Gaming Control Act or any of its regulations, it could limit, condition, suspend or revoke our registrations and gaming licenses. In addition, we and the persons involved could be subject to substantial fines for each separate violation of the Nevada Gaming Control Act, or of the regulations of the Nevada Gaming Commission, at the discretion of the Nevada Gaming Commission. Further, the Nevada Gaming Commission could appoint a supervisor to conduct the operations of our casinos and, under specified circumstances, earnings generated during the supervisor’s appointment (except for the reasonable rental value of the premises) could be forfeited to the State of Nevada. Limitation, conditioning or suspension of any of our gaming licenses and the appointment of a supervisor could, and revocation of any gaming license would, have a significant negative effect on our gaming operations.


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Requirements for Beneficial Securities Holders
Regardless of the number of shares held, any beneficial holder of our voting securities may be required to file an application, be investigated and have that person’s suitability as a beneficial holder of voting securities determined if the Nevada Gaming Commission has reason to believe that the ownership would otherwise be inconsistent with the declared policies of the State of Nevada. If the beneficial holder of the voting securities who must be found suitable is a corporation, partnership, limited partnership, limited liability company or trust, it must submit detailed business and financial information including a list of its beneficial owners. The applicant must pay all costs of the investigation incurred by the Nevada Gaming Authorities in conducting any investigation.
The Nevada Gaming Control Act requires any person who acquires more than 5% of the voting securities of a registered company to report the acquisition to the Nevada Gaming Commission. The Nevada Gaming Control Act requires beneficial owners of more than 10% of a registered company’s voting securities to apply to the Nevada Gaming Commission for a finding of suitability within 30 days after the Chairman of the Nevada State Gaming Control Board mails the written notice requiring such filing. Under certain circumstances, an “institutional investor,” as defined in the Nevada Gaming Control Act, which acquires more than 10%, but not more than 15%, of the registered company’s voting securities may apply to the Nevada Gaming Commission for a waiver of a finding of suitability if the institutional investor holds the voting securities for investment purposes only. In certain circumstances, an institutional investor that has obtained a waiver can hold up to 19% of a registered company’s voting securities for a limited period of time and maintain the waiver. An institutional investor will not be deemed to hold voting securities for investment purposes unless the voting securities were acquired and are held in the ordinary course of business as an institutional investor and not for the purpose of causing, directly or indirectly, the election of a majority of the members of the board at directors of the registered company, a change in the corporate charter, bylaws, management, policies or operations of the registered company, or any of its gaming affiliates, or any other action which the Nevada Gaming Commission finds to be inconsistent with holding the registered company’s voting securities for investment purposes only. Activities which are not deemed to be inconsistent with holding voting securities for investment purposes only include:
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voting on all matters voted on by stockholders or interest holders;
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making financial and other inquiries of management of the type normally made by securities analysts for informational purposes and not to cause a change in its management, policies or operations; and
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other activities that the Nevada Gaming Commission may determine to be consistent with such investment intent.
Consequences of Being Found Unsuitable
Any person who fails or refuses to apply for a finding of suitability or a license within 30 days after being ordered to do so by the Nevada Gaming Commission or by the Chairman of the Nevada State Gaming Control Board, or who refuses or fails to pay the investigative costs incurred by the Nevada Gaming Authorities in connection with the investigation of its application, may be found unsuitable. The same restrictions apply to a record owner if the record owner, after request, fails to identify the beneficial owner. Any person found unsuitable and who holds, directly or indirectly, any beneficial ownership of any voting security or debt security of a registered company beyond the period of time as may be prescribed by the Nevada Gaming Commission may be guilty of a criminal offense. We will be subject to disciplinary action if, after we receive notice that a person is unsuitable to hold an equity interest or to have any other relationship with, we:
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pay that person any dividend or interest upon any voting securities;
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allow that person to exercise, directly or indirectly, any voting right held by that person;
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pay remuneration in any form to that person for services rendered or otherwise; or
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fail to pursue all lawful efforts to require the unsuitable person to relinquish such person’s voting securities including, if necessary, the immediate purchase of the voting securities for cash at fair market value.


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Gaming Laws Relating to Securities Ownership
The Nevada Gaming Commission may, in its discretion, require the holder of any debt or similar securities of a registered company to file applications, be investigated and be found suitable to own the debt or other security of the registered company if the Nevada Gaming Commission; has reason to believe that such ownership would otherwise be inconsistent with the declared policies of the State of Nevada. If the Nevada Gaming Commission decides that a person is unsuitable to own the security, then under the Nevada Gaming Control Act, the registered company can be sanctioned, including the loss of its approvals if, without the prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission, it:
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pays to the unsuitable person any dividend, interest or any distribution whatsoever;
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recognizes any voting right by the unsuitable person in connection with the securities;
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pays the unsuitable person remuneration in any form; or
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makes any payment to the unsuitable person by way of principal, redemption, conversion, exchange, liquidation or similar transaction.
We are required to maintain a current stock ledger in Nevada which may be examined by the Nevada Gaming Authorities at any time. If any securities are held in trust by an agent or by a nominee, the record holder may be required to disclose the identity of the beneficial owner to the Nevada Gaming Authorities. A failure to make the disclosure may be grounds for finding the record holder unsuitable. We will be required to render maximum assistance in determining the identity of the beneficial owner of any of our voting securities. The Nevada Gaming Commission has the power to require the stock certificates of any registered company to bear a legend indicating that the securities are subject to the Nevada Gaming Control Act and certain subject to restrictions imposed by applicable gaming laws. To date, this requirement has not been imposed on us.
Approval of Public Offerings
Neither we nor any of our affiliates may make a public offering of securities without the prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission if the proceeds from the offering are intended to be used to construct, acquire or finance gaming facilities in Nevada, or to retire or extend obligations incurred for those purposes or for similar transactions. The Nevada Commission has granted AREP prior approval to make public offerings for a period of two years expiring in May 2008, subject to certain conditions. This approval, or the shelf approval, may be rescinded for good cause without prior notice upon the issuance of an interlocutory stop order by the Chairman of the Nevada Board and must be renewed at the end of the two-year approval period. The shelf approval applies to any affiliated company wholly owned by us, or an affiliate, which is a publicly traded corporation or would thereby become a publicly traded corporation pursuant to a public offering. The shelf approval includes approval for Stratosphere Gaming Corp. to guarantee any security issued by, or to hypothecate its assets to secure the payment or performance of any obligations evidenced by a security issued by us or an affiliate in a public offering under the shelf approval. The shelf approval also includes approval for us to place restrictions upon the transfer of, and to enter into agreements not to encumber the equity securities of our subsidiaries licensed or registered in Nevada, as applicable, in conjunction with public offerings made under the shelf approval. The shelf approval does not constitute a finding, recommendation or approval by the Nevada Commission or the Nevada Board as to the accuracy or adequacy of the prospectus or the investment merits of the securities offered. Any representation to the contrary is unlawful.
Approval of Changes in Control
As a registered company, we must obtain prior approval of the Nevada Gaming Commission with respect to a change in control through:
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mergers;
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consolidation;
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stock or asset acquisitions;
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management or consulting agreements; or
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any act or conduct by a person by which the person obtains control of us.


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Entities seeking to acquire control of a registered company must satisfy the Nevada State Gaming Control Board and Nevada Gaming Commission with respect to a variety of stringent standards before assuming control of the registered company. The Nevada Gaming Commission may also require controlling stockholders, officers, directors and other persons having a material relationship or involvement with the entity proposing to acquire control to be investigated and licensed as part of the approval process relating to the transaction.
Approval of Defensive Tactics
The Nevada legislature has declared that some corporate acquisitions opposed by management, repurchases of voting securities and corporate defense tactics affecting Nevada gaming licenses or affecting registered companies that are affiliated with the operations permitted by Nevada gaming licenses may be harmful to stable and productive corporate gaming. The Nevada Gaming Commission has established a regulatory scheme to reduce the potentially adverse effects of these business practices upon Nevada’s gaming industry and to further Nevada’s policy to:
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assure the financial stability of corporate gaming operators and their affiliates;
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preserve the beneficial aspects of conducting business in the corporate form; and
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promote a neutral environment for the orderly governance of corporate affairs.
As a registered company, we may need to obtain approvals from the Nevada Gaming Commission before we can make exceptional repurchases of voting securities above our current market price and before a corporate acquisition opposed by management can be consummated. The Nevada Gaming Control Act also requires prior approval of a plan of recapitalization proposed by a registered company’s board of directors in response to a tender offer made directly to its stockholders for the purpose of acquiring control.
Fees and Taxes
License fees and taxes, computed in various ways depending on the type of gaming or activity involved, are payable to the State of Nevada and to the counties and cities in which the licensed subsidiaries respective operations are conducted. Depending upon the particular fee or tax involved, these fees and taxes are payable either monthly, quarterly or annually and are based upon:
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a percentage of gross revenues received;
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the number of gaming devices operated; or
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the number of table games operated.
Our casinos are also subject to a state payroll tax based on the wages paid to their employees.
Foreign Gaming Investigations
Any person who is licensed, required to be licensed, registered, required to be registered, or is under common control with those persons, or licensees, and who proposes to become involved in a gaming venture outside of Nevada, is required to deposit with the Nevada State Gaming Control Board, and thereafter maintain, a revolving fund in the amount of $10,000 to pay the expenses of investigation of the Nevada State Gaming Control Board of the licensee’s or registrant’s participation in such foreign gaming. The revolving fund is subject to increase or decrease in the discretion of the Nevada Gaming Commission. Licensees and registrants are required to comply with the reporting requirements imposed by the Nevada Gaming Control Act. A licensee or registrant is also subject to disciplinary action by the Nevada Gaming Commission if it:
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knowingly violates any laws of the foreign jurisdiction pertaining to the foreign gaming operation;
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fails to conduct the foreign gaming operation in accordance with the standards of honesty and integrity required of Nevada gaming operations;
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engages in any activity or enters into any association that is unsuitable because it poses an unreasonable threat to the control of gaming in Nevada, reflects, or tends to reflect, discredit or disrepute upon the State of Nevada or gaming in Nevada, or is contrary to the gaming policies of Nevada;


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engages in activities or enters into associations that are harmful to the State of Nevada or its ability to collect gaming taxes and fees; or
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employs, contracts with or associates with a person in the foreign operation who has been denied a license or finding of suitability in Nevada on the ground of unsuitability.
License for Conduct of Gaming and Sale of Alcoholic Beverage
The conduct of our gaming activities and the service and sale of alcoholic beverages by our casinos are subject to licensing, control and regulation by the Clark County Liquor and Gaming Licensing Board and the City of Las Vegas. In addition to approving our casinos, the Clark County Liquor and Gaming License Board and the City of Las Vegas have the authority to approve all persons owning or controlling the stock of any corporation controlling a gaming license. All licenses are revocable and are not transferable. The county and city agencies have full power to limit, condition, suspend or revoke any license. Any disciplinary action could, and revocation would, have a substantial negative impact upon our operations.
Seasonality
Generally, our Las Vegas gaming and entertainment properties are not affected by seasonal trends. However, the Aquarius tends to have increased customer flow from mid-January through April.
Employees
At December 31, 2006, our Gaming segment had approximately 5,340 employees, of whom approximately 2,060 were covered by various collective bargaining agreements providing, generally, for basic pay rates, working hours, other conditions of employment, and orderly settlement of labor disputes. Our Gaming segment historically has had good relationships with the unions representing its employees and believes that its employee relations are good.
Real Estate
Rental Real Estate
Our rental real estate operations consist primarily of retail, office and industrial properties leased to single corporate tenants. Historically, substantially all of our real estate assets leased to others have been net-leased under long-term leases. With certain exceptions, these tenants are required to pay all expenses relating to the leased property and, therefore, we are typically not responsible for payment of expenses, including maintenance, utilities, taxes, insurance or any capital items associated with such properties.
In 2006, we continued to capitalize on favorable real estate market conditions and the mature nature of our commercial real estate portfolio by selling 18 rental real estate properties for approximately $25.3 million. These properties were unencumbered by mortgage debt. As of December 31, 2006, we owned 37 rental real estate properties with a book value of approximately $136.2 million, individually encumbered by mortgage debt which aggregated approximately $77.0 million. We continue to evaluate our remaining commercial portfolio with the view of selling assets at favorable prices.
We also seek opportunities to acquire additional rental real estate properties. While we believe opportunities in real estate related acquisitions continue to remain available, there is increasing competition for these opportunities which affects price and the ability to find quality assets that provide attractive returns.
Real Estate Development
Our residential home development operations focus primarily on the construction and sale of single-family homes, custom-built homes, multi-family homes and residential lots in subdivisions and in planned communities. Our home building business is managed by Bayswater Development LLC, our wholly-owned subsidiary. Our long-term investment horizon and operational expertise allow us to acquire properties with limited current income and complex entitlement and development issues.


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We are currently developing seven residential subdivisions in New York, Florida and Massachusetts. In New York, we are developing two high-end residential subdivisions in Westchester County: Penwood, located in Bedford, and Hammond Ridge, located in Armonk and New Castle. We are also seeking approval to develop Pond View Estates which is located in Patterson and Kent in Putnam County, New York. In Cape Cod, Massachusetts, we are developing our New Seabury property, a luxury second-home waterfront community. In Vero Beach, Florida, we are building out our Grand Harbor and Oak Harbor properties, two residential waterfront communities. In Naples, Florida, we are building Falling Waters, a condominium community.
New Seabury Development. New Seabury is a 2,000 acre resort community located in Cape Cod, Massachusetts overlooking Nantucket Sound and Martha’s Vineyard. We have begun the first phase of our planned 457 unit residential development. During the year ended December 31, 2006, 37 homes were built and sold. The average sales price was $975,000 with a range of sales prices between $458,000 and $2.4 million. As of December 31, 2006, of our remaining 420 units, 29 units were in various stages of construction, eight of which were under contract. The average sale price of the units under contract is $797,000 with a range of sales prices between $458,000 and $1.8 million. In addition, two lots are under contract with an average sales price of $785,000.
Grand Harbor and Oak Harbor. Grand Harbor and Oak Harbor are two waterfront communities located in Vero Beach, Florida. During the year ended December 31, 2006, 21 homes and one lot were sold. The average sales price of the homes was $770,000 with a range of sales prices between $335,000 and $1.1 million. The lot was sold for $250,000. As of December 31, 2006, we had 355 lots remaining and homes on 35 of these lots were in various stages of construction, seven of which were under contract. The average sales price of the units under contract is $811,000 with a range of sales prices between $673,000 and $995,000. In addition, we own approximately 400 acres to the north of Grand Harbor available for development.
Penwood. Located in Bedford, New York, Penwood consists of 44 lots situated on 297 acres. The development is approximately one hour from Manhattan. Homes are situated on lots that range from 2.1 acres to 14.5 acres. Homes range in size from 5,400 square feet to 9,600 square feet. In 2006, we sold one Penwood home for $2.4 million. At December 31, 2006, our three remaining lots had homes under construction. Two of the homes were under contract for an average price of $2.75 million.
Hammond Ridge. Located in Armonk and New Castle, New York, Hammond Ridge consists of 37 single-family lots situated on 220 acres. The development is approximately 40 minutes from Manhattan. Purchasers of Hammond Ridge units may select one of many home designs and many options and upgrades that we offer or customize designs. During the year ended December 31, 2006, nine homes and two lots were sold. The average sales price of the homes was $2.2 million with a range of sales prices between $1.6 million and $3.2 million. The average price of the lots was $920,000. At December 31, 2006, we had 18 remaining units in various stages of completion of which seven homes and one lot were under contract. The average sales price of the units under contract is $2.1 million with a range of prices between $1.6 million and $2.7 million. The price of the lot under contract is $650,000.
Pond View Estates. Located in Patterson and Kent, New York, Pond View Estates is a townhouse condominium development on a 91-acre wooded hillside overlooking an on-site pond. We expect to build a 50-townhouse condominium once final approvals are granted. Pre-sales are expected to begin in 2008.
Falling Waters. Located in Naples, Florida, Falling Waters is a 793-unit condominium development on 158 acres located approximately ten minutes from downtown Naples, Florida. It is a gated community with 24-hour security. During the year ended December 31, 2006, we sold 57 condominium units at an average price of $252,000. At December 31, 2006, we had 52 units remaining in various stages of completion of which 39 units were under contract for sale.
Additional Developments. We have invested and expect to continue to invest in undeveloped land and development properties. We are highly selective in making investments in residential home development. Currently we are reviewing a wide variety of potential developments in New York and Florida.
Hotel and Resort Operations
New Seabury Resort. New Seabury is a resort community overlooking Nantucket Sound and Martha’s Vineyard in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. In addition to our residential development at New Seabury, we operate a full-service resort. The property currently includes a golf club with two 18-hole championship golf courses, the Popponesset Inn,


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which is a casual waterfront dining and wedding facility, a private beach club, a fitness center, a 16 court tennis facility and a total of 19 rental units (condominiums and cottages).
Grand Harbor and Oak Harbor. In addition to the residential development at Grand Harbor and Oak Harbor, we operate three golf courses (45 holes), a tennis complex (ten courts), fitness center, beach club, two clubhouses and a 24 bed assisted living facility located adjacent to the Intracoastal Waterway in Vero Beach, Florida.
Seasonality
Resort operations are highly seasonal with peak activity in Cape Cod from June to September and in Florida from November to February. Sales activity for our real estate developments in Cape Cod and New York typically peak in late winter and early spring while in Florida our peak selling season is during the winter months.
Employees
Our real estate-related activities, including rental real estate, real estate development and hotel and resort operations, have approximately 450 full and part-time employees, which fluctuates due to the seasonal nature of certain of our businesses. No such employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements.
Home Fashion
Background
We conduct our Home Fashion operations through WPI, a manufacturer and distributor of home fashion consumer products based in New York, NY. On August 8, 2005, WPI and its subsidiaries completed the purchase of substantially all the assets of WestPoint Stevens Inc. and certain of its subsidiaries pursuant to an asset purchase agreement, or the Purchase Agreement, approved by The United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York in connection with Chapter 11 proceedings of WestPoint Stevens. WestPoint Stevens was a premier manufacturer and marketer of bed and bath home fashions supplying leading U.S. retailers and institutional customers. Before the asset purchase transaction, WPI did not have any operations.
On August 8, 2005, we acquired 13.2 million, or 67.7%, of the 19.5 million outstanding common shares of WPI. In consideration for the shares, we paid $219.9 million in cash and received the balance in respect of a portion of the debt of WestPoint Stevens. Pursuant to the purchase agreement, rights to subscribe for an additional 10.5 million shares of common stock at a price of $8.772 per share, or the rights offering, were allocated among former creditors of WestPoint Stevens. Under the purchase agreement and the Bankruptcy Court order approving the sale, or the Sale Order, we would receive rights to subscribe for at least 2.5 million of such shares and we agreed to purchase up to an additional 8.0 million shares of common stock to the extent that any rights were not exercised by other holders of subscription rights. Accordingly, upon completion of the rights offering and depending upon the extent to which the other holders exercise certain subscription rights, we would beneficially own between 15.7 million and 23.7 million shares of WPI common stock representing between 52.3% and 79.0% of the 30.0 million shares that would then be outstanding.
On December 20, 2006, we acquired (1) 1,000,000 shares of Series A-1 Preferred Stock of WPI for a purchase price of $100 per share, for an aggregate purchase price of $100.0 million, and (2) 1,000,000 shares of Series A-2 Preferred Stock of WPI for a purchase price of $100 per share, for an aggregate purchase price of $100.0 million. Each of the Series A-1 and Series A-2 Preferred Stock has a 4.50% annual dividend rate which is paid quarterly. For the first two years after issuance, the dividends are to be paid in the form of additional preferred stock. Thereafter, the dividends are to be paid in cash or in additional preferred stock at the option of WPI. Each of the Series A-1 and Series A-2 Preferred Stock is convertible into common shares of WPI at a rate of $10.50 per share, subject to certain anti-dilution provisions.
WPI has its own board of directors and audit committee. We are the only holders of WPI’s preferred stock, and, in accordance with its terms, we have the right to elect six of the ten directors of the WPI board of directors. The WPI board of directors does not include any of our independent directors.
In 2005,certain of the first lien lenders of WestPoint Stevens appealed portions of the Bankruptcy Court’s Sale Order. In connection with that appeal, the subscription rights distributed to the second lien lenders at closing were


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placed in escrow. In 2006, these first lien lenders also filed a complaint in the Delaware Chancery Court together with the trustee for the first lien lenders, Beal Bank, S.S.O., seeking, among other things, an order to “unwind” the issuance of the preferred stock, or alternatively directing that such preferred stock be held in trust. We are vigorously contesting both proceedings. Depending on the implementation of any changes to the Sale Order or any action taken by the Delaware Chancery Court, ownership in WPI may be distributed in a different manner than described above, we may own less than a majority of WPI’s shares of common stock and our ownership of the preferred stock may change. Our loss of control of WPI could adversely affect WPI’s business and the value of our investment. See Item 1A. Risk Factors and Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
We consolidated the balance sheet and results of operations of WPI as of December 31, 2006 and 2005 and for the period from the date of acquisition through December 31, 2006. If we were to own less than 50% of the outstanding common stock, we would have to evaluate whether we should consolidate WPI and our financial statements could be materially different than as presented as of December 31, 2006 and 2005 and for the periods then ended. See Item 1A. Risk Factors and Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Business
WPI’s business consists of manufacturing, sourcing, distributing, marketing and selling home fashion consumer products. WPI differentiates itself in the $14.0 billion home fashion textile industry based on its nearly 200 year reputation for providing its customers with (1) the full assortment of home fashion products, (2) best-in-class customer service, (3) a superior value proposition and (4) branded and private label products with strong consumer recognition. WPI markets a broad range of manufactured and sourced bed, bath and basic bedding products, including sheets, pillowcases, bedspreads, quilts, comforters and duvet covers, bath towels, bath rugs, beach towels, shower curtains, bath accessories, bedskirts, bed pillows, flocked blankets, woven blankets and throws, and heated blankets and mattress pads. WPI continues to serve substantially all the former customers of WestPoint Stevens using assets acquired from WestPoint Stevens and through sourcing activities.
WPI manufactures and sources its products in a wide assortment of colors and patterns from a variety of fabrics, including chambray, twill, sateen, flannel and linen, and from a variety of fibers, including cotton, synthetics and cotton blends. WPI seeks to position its business as a single-source supplier to retailers of bed and bath products, offering a broad assortment of products across multiple price points. WPI believes that product and price point breadth will allow it to provide a comprehensive product offering for each major distribution channel.
WPI operates its business through its corporate office, showroom and design studio in New York City, office space in Georgia and Alabama, eight manufacturing facilities in Alabama, Florida, Maine and North Carolina, a chemical plant in Alabama, a printing facility in Georgia, a manufacturing facility in Bahrain, a manufacturing facility in Pakistan (through a joint venture), ten distribution centers and warehouses and 32 retail stores.
Strategy
WPI’s strategy is to lower its cost of goods sold and improve its long-term profitability by lessening its dependence upon higher-cost domestic sources of manufactured products through establishing offshore manufacturing and sourcing arrangements. This may entail further domestic plant closings in addition to the ones already closed. WPI’s offshore sourcing arrangements employ a combination of owned and operated facilities, joint ventures and long term supply contracts. In addition, WPI is lowering its general and administrative expense by consolidating its locations, reducing headcount and applying more stringent oversight of expense areas where potential savings may be realized. WPI is also seeking to increase its revenues by selling more licensed, differentiated and proprietary products to WPI’s existing customers. WPI believes that it can improve margins over time through upgraded marketing, selective product development, enhanced design and improved customer service capabilities.
Beginning in late 2005, WPI began to identify potentially viable manufacturing and third-party sourcing opportunities outside of the U.S. In 2006, WPI entered into an equity joint venture in Pakistan with Indus Dyeing & Manufacturing Ltd. This joint venture, Indus Home Ltd., began production in October 2006 of bath products and is in the process of expanding its existing capacity. In December 2006, WPI acquired bed products manufacturing facilities from Manama Textile Mills WLL in Bahrain, creating WestPoint Home (Bahrain) WLL. These initiatives have permitted WPI to replace certain of its higher cost U.S.-based manufacturing capacity.


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Brands, Trademarks and Licenses
WPI markets its products under trademarks, brand names and private labels. WPI uses trademarks, brand names and private labels as merchandising tools to assist its customers in coordinating their product offerings and differentiating their products from those of their competitors.
WPI manufactures and sells its own branded line of home fashion products consisting of merchandise bearing trademarks that include Atelier Martex®, Grand Patrician®, Martex®, Patrician®, Lady Pepperell®, Luxor®, Seduction®, Utica®, Vellux®, Baby Martex® and Chatham®.
In addition, some of WPI’s home fashion products are manufactured and sold pursuant to licensing agreements under designer and brand names that include, among others, Lauren/Ralph Lauren, Charisma, Rachel Ray, Scooby Doo and Harley Davidson.
Private label brands, also known as “store brands,” are controlled by individual retail customers through use of their own brands or through an exclusive license or other arrangement with brand owners. Private label brands provide retail customers with a way to promote consumer loyalty. As the brand is owned and controlled by WPI’s retail customers and not by WPI, WPI tends to earn smaller margins and has limited ability to prevent retail customers from discontinuing doing business with it. As WPI’s customer base has experienced consolidation, there has been an increasing focus on proprietary branding strategies.
The percentage of WPI net sales derived from the sale of private label branded and from unbranded products for 2006 was approximately 47%. For 2006, the percentage of WPI net sales derived from sales under brands it owns and controls was 26%, and the percentage of WPI net sales derived from sales under brands owned by third parties pursuant to licensing arrangements with WPI was 20%. Sales from WPI’s stores accounted for approximately 7% of total sales for 2006.
Marketing
WPI markets its products through leading department stores, mass merchants, specialty stores, institutional channels and retail stores owned and operated by WPI. Through marketing efforts directed towards retailers and institutional clients, WPI seeks to create products and services in direct response to recognized consumer trends by focusing on elements such as product design, product innovation, packaging, store displays and other marketing support.
WPI works closely with its major customers to assist them in merchandising and promoting WPI’s products to consumers. In addition, WPI periodically meets with its customers in an effort to maximize product exposure and sales and to jointly develop merchandise assortments and plan promotional events specifically tailored to the customer. WPI provides merchandising assistance with store layouts, fixture designs, advertising and point-of-sale displays. A national consumer and trade advertising campaign and comprehensive internet website have served to enhance brand recognition. WPI also provides its customers with suggested customized advertising materials designed to increase product sales. A heightened focus on consumer research provides needed products on a continual basis. WPI distributes finished products directly to retailers. The majority of WPI’s remaining sales of home fashion products are through the institutional channel, which includes hospitality and healthcare establishments, as well as laundry supply businesses.
WPI also sells its and other manufacturer’s products through its retail stores division, which, at December 31, 2006, consisted of 32 geographically dispersed, value-priced retail outlets throughout the United States, most of which are located in factory outlet shopping centers. WestPoint Home retail stores sell first quality products, overstocks, seconds, discontinued items and other products.
Competition
The home fashion industry is highly competitive in terms of price, quality and service. Future success will, to a large extent, depend on WestPoint’s ability to be a low-cost producer and to be competitive. WPI competes with both foreign and domestic companies on, among other factors, the basis of price, quality and customer service. In the sheet and towel markets, WPI competes with many competitors. WPI may also face competition in the future from companies that are currently suppliers. Future success depends on the ability to remain competitive in the areas of marketing, product development, price, quality, brand names, manufacturing capabilities, distribution and order


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processing. Additionally, the easing of trade restrictions over time has led to growing competition from low priced products imported from Asia and Latin America.
Seasonality and Cyclicality
The Home Fashion industry is seasonal, with a peak sales season in the fall. In response to this seasonality, WPI increases its inventory levels during the first six months of the year to meet customer demands for the peak fall season. In addition, the Home Fashion industry is cyclical and performance may be negatively affected by downturns in consumer spending.
Employees
WPI and its subsidiaries employed approximately 7,580 employees as of December 31, 2006. Currently, less than 3% of WPI’s employees are unionized.
Investments
We seek to invest our available cash and cash equivalents in debt and equity securities with a view to enhancing returns as we continue to assess further acquisitions of operating businesses. During 2006, we had a net gain on investment activity of approximately $91.3 million, comprised of approximately $51.9 million in realized gains and $39.4 million in unrealized gains.
As of December 31, 2006, 30.4% of our total investments, or $163.7 million, were managed by an unaffiliated third-party investment manager. These investments are predominantly fixed income securities that have an average duration of less than one month, and, in total, are managed to have an average S&P credit quality of above A-. We make these investments to maintain liquidity while achieving better risk-adjusted returns than could be attained by investing in cash or cash equivalents.
We also may invest in debt, equity and derivative securities that we believe have the potential for achieving returns significantly in excess of overall market performance or with the prospect of the issuers of the securities becoming operating businesses we control. We believe that these securities may have greater inherent value than indicated by their market price and may present the opportunity for “activist” bondholders or shareholders to be catalysts to realize value. The equity securities in which we may invest may include common stock, preferred stock and securities convertible into common stock, as well as warrants to purchase these securities and equity derivatives. The debt securities and obligations in which we may invest may include bonds, debentures, notes, mortgage-related securities and municipal obligations as well as debt derivatives. Certain of these securities may include lower-rated securities which may provide the potential for higher yields and therefore may entail higher risks. In addition, we may engage in various investment techniques, including short selling, options, futures, foreign currency transactions and leveraging for hedging or other purposes.
We conduct our activities in a manner so as not to be deemed an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended. Generally, this means that we do not intend to invest in securities as our primary business and that no more than 40% of our total assets will be invested in investment securities as such term is defined in the Investment Company Act. In addition, we intend to structure our investments so as to continue to be taxed as a partnership rather than as a corporation under the applicable publicly traded partnership rules of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.
Available Information
Our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports are available, without charge, on our website, http://www.arep.com/investor.shtml as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed electronically with the SEC. Copies are also available, without charge, by writing American Real Estate Partners, L.P., 767 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4700, New York, NY 10153, Attention: Investor Relations. Our website is http://www.arep.com.
Each of ACEP, Atlantic Coast and NEGI separately files with the Securities and Exchange Commission annual, quarterly and current reports that are available to the public free of charge either from each respective company or at the SEC website at http://www.sec.gov.


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Item 1A. Risk Factors
Risks Relating to Our Structure
Our general partner and its control person could exercise their influence over us to your detriment.
Mr. Icahn, through affiliates, currently owns 100% of API, our general partner, and approximately 86.5% of our outstanding preferred units and approximately 90.0% of our outstanding depositary units, and, as a result, has the ability to influence many aspects of our operations and affairs. API also is the general partner of AREH.
The interests of Mr. Icahn, including his interests in entities in which he and we have invested or may invest in the future, may differ from your interests as a unitholder and, as such, he may take actions that may not be in your interest. For example, if we encounter financial difficulties or are unable to pay our debts as they mature, Mr. Icahn’s interests might conflict with your interests.
In addition, if Mr. Icahn were to sell, or otherwise transfer, some or all of his interests in us to an unrelated party or group, a change of control could be deemed to have occurred under the terms of the indentures governing our notes which would require us to offer to repurchase all outstanding notes at 101% of their principal amount plus accrued and unpaid interest and liquidated damages, if any, to the date of repurchase. However, it is possible that we will not have sufficient funds at the time of the change of control to make the required repurchase of notes.
We have engaged, and in the future may engage, in transactions with our affiliates.
We have invested and may in the future invest in entities in which Mr. Icahn also invests. We also have purchased and may in the future purchase entities or investments from him or his affiliates. Although API has never received fees in connection with our investments, our partnership agreement allows for the payment of these fees. Mr. Icahn may pursue other business opportunities in industries in which we compete and there is no requirement that any additional business opportunities be presented to us.
Mr. Icahn has proposed that we acquire his interests in American Railcar and Philip Services. American Railcar is a publicly traded company that is primarily engaged in the business of manufacturing covered hoppers and tank railcars. Philip Services is an industrial services company that provides industrial outsourcing, environmental services and metal services to major industry sectors throughout North America. Two committees, one consisting of two independent directors and the other of three independent directors of our board, have been formed to consider the proposals. The committees are in various stages of reviewing the proposals with counsel and financial advisers. No agreement has been reached as to price or terms. Each acquisition would be subject to, among other things, the negotiation, execution and closing of a definitive agreement and the receipt of a fairness opinion.
We continuously identify, evaluate and engage in discussions concerning potential investments and acquisitions, including potential investments in and acquisitions of affiliates of Mr. Icahn. There cannot be any assurance that the current proposals or any other potential transactions that we consider will be completed.
Certain of our management are committed to the management of other businesses.
Certain of the individuals who conduct the affairs of API, including the chairman of our board of directors, Mr. Icahn, our principal executive officer and vice chairman of the board of directors, Keith A. Meister, and our President, Peter K. Shea, are, and will be, committed to the management of other businesses owned or controlled by Mr. Icahn and his affiliates. Accordingly, these individuals may focus significant amounts of time and attention on managing these other businesses. Conflicts may arise between our interests and the other entities or business activities in which such individuals are involved. Conflicts of interest may arise in the future as we may compete with such affiliates for the same assets, purchasers and sellers of assets or financings.
To service our indebtedness and pay distributions with respect to our units, we will require a significant amount of cash. Our ability to maintain our current cash position or generate cash depends on many factors beyond our control.
Our ability to make payments on and to refinance our indebtedness, to pay distributions with respect to our units and to fund operations will depend on existing cash balances and our ability to generate cash in the future. This, to a


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certain extent, is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control.
Our current businesses and businesses that we acquire may not generate sufficient cash to service our debt. In addition, we may not generate sufficient cash flow from operations or investments and future borrowings may not be available to us in an amount sufficient to enable us to service our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs. We may need to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness on or before maturity. We cannot assure you that we will be able to refinance any of our indebtedness on commercially reasonable terms or at all.
We are a holding company and will depend on the businesses of our subsidiaries to satisfy our obligations.
We are a holding company. In addition to cash and cash equivalents, U.S. government and agency obligations, marketable equity and debt securities and other short-term investments, our assets consist primarily of investments in our subsidiaries. Moreover, if we make significant investments in operating businesses, it is likely that we will reduce the liquid assets at AREP and AREH in order to fund those investments and the ongoing operations of our subsidiaries. Consequently, our cash flow and our ability to meet our debt service obligations and make distributions with respect to depositary units and preferred units likely will depend on the cash flow of our subsidiaries and the payment of funds to us by our subsidiaries in the form of dividends, distributions, loans or otherwise.
The operating results of our subsidiaries may not be sufficient to make distributions to us. In addition, our subsidiaries are not obligated to make funds available to us, and distributions and intercompany transfers from our subsidiaries to us may be restricted by applicable law or covenants contained in debt agreements and other agreements to which these subsidiaries may be subject or enter into in the future. The terms of any borrowings of our subsidiaries or other entities in which we own equity may restrict dividends, distributions or loans to us. For example, the notes issued by our indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, ACEP, contain restrictions on dividends and distributions and loans to us, as well as on other transactions with us. ACEP also has a credit agreement which contains financial covenants that have the effect of restricting dividends or distributions. This agreement precludes our receiving payments from the operations of our Gaming properties which account for a significant portion of our revenues and cash flows. We have credit facilities for WPI and our real estate development properties which also restrict dividends, distributions and other transactions with us. To the degree any distributions and transfers are impaired or prohibited, our ability to make payments on our debt will be limited.
We or our subsidiaries may be able to incur substantially more debt.
We or our subsidiaries may be able to incur substantial additional indebtedness in the future. The terms of our 8.125% senior notes due 2012 and our 7.125% senior notes due 2013 do not prohibit us or our subsidiaries from doing so. We and AREH may incur additional indebtedness if we comply with certain financial tests contained in the indentures that govern these notes. As of December 31, 2006, based on these tests, we and AREH could have incurred up to approximately $1.6 billion of additional indebtedness. Since that date, we issued $500.0 million principal amount of our 7.125% senior notes due 2013, reducing the amount that we and AREH could incur based upon this test. If we complete the acquisition of Lear and fund the acquisition with borrowings, as we currently contemplate, under the financial tests contained in the indentures, AREP and AREH will not be able to incur additional indebtedness. However, our subsidiaries, other than AREH, are not subject to any of the covenants contained in the indentures with respect to our senior notes, including the covenant restricting debt incurrence. If new debt is added to our and our subsidiaries’ current debt levels, the related risks that we, and they, now face could intensify.
Our failure to comply with the covenants contained under any of our debt instruments, including the indentures governing our outstanding notes, including our failure as a result of events beyond our control, could result in an event of default which would materially and adversely affect our financial condition.
If there were an event of default under one of our debt instruments, the holders of the defaulted debt could cause all amounts outstanding with respect to that debt to be due and payable immediately. In addition, any event of default or declaration of acceleration under one debt instrument could result in an event of default under one or more of our other debt instruments. It is possible that, if the defaulted debt is accelerated, our assets and cash flow may not be sufficient to fully repay borrowings under our outstanding debt instruments and we cannot assure you that we would be able to refinance or restructure the payments on those debt securities.


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The market for our securities may be volatile.
The market for our equity securities may be subject to disruptions that could cause substantial volatility in their prices. Any such disruptions may adversely affect the value of your securities.
We have only recently made cash distributions to our unitholders, and future distributions, if any, can be affected by numerous factors.
While we made cash distributions with respect to each of the four quarters of 2006 in the amount of $0.10 per depositary unit, the payment of future distributions will be determined by the board of directors of our general partner quarterly, based on a review of a number of factors, including those described below and other factors that it deems relevant at the time that declaration of a distribution is considered. Our ability to pay distributions will depend on numerous factors, including the availability of adequate cash flow from operations; the proceeds, if any, from divestitures; our capital requirements and other obligations; restrictions contained in our financing arrangements, and our issuances of additional equity and debt securities. The availability of cash flow in the future depends as well upon events and circumstances outside our control, including prevailing economic and industry conditions and financial, business and similar factors. No assurance can be given that we will be able to make distributions or as to the timing of any distribution. If distributions are made, there can be no assurance that holders of depositary units may not be required to recognize taxable income in excess of cash distributions made in respect of the period in which a distribution is made.
Holders of our depositary units have limited voting rights, rights to participate in our management and control of us.
Our general partner manages and operates AREP. Unlike the holders of common stock in a corporation, holders of our outstanding depositary units have only limited voting rights on matters affecting our business. Holders of depositary units have no right to elect the general partner on an annual or other continuing basis, and our general partner generally may not be removed except pursuant to the vote of the holders of not less than 75% of the outstanding depositary units. In addition, removal of the general partner may result in a default under our debt securities. As a result, holders of depositary units have limited say in matters affecting our operations and others may find it difficult to attempt to gain control or influence our activities.
Holders of depositary units may not have limited liability in certain circumstances and may be liable for the return of distributions that cause our liabilities to exceed our assets.
We conduct our businesses through AREH in several states. Maintenance of limited liability will require compliance with legal requirements of those states. We are the sole limited partner of AREH. Limitations on the liability of a limited partner for the obligations of a limited partnership have not clearly been established in several states. If it were determined that AREH has been conducting business in any state without compliance with the applicable limited partnership statute or the possession or exercise of the right by the partnership, as limited partner of AREH, to remove its general partner, to approve certain amendments to the AREH partnership agreement or to take other action pursuant to the AREH partnership agreement, constituted “control” of AREH’s business for the purposes of the statutes of any relevant state, AREP and/or unitholders, under certain circumstances, might be held personally liable for AREH’s obligations to the same extent as our general partner. Further, under the laws of certain states, AREP might be liable for the amount of distributions made to AREP by AREH.
Holders of our depositary units may also have to repay AREP amounts wrongfully distributed to them. Under Delaware law, we may not make a distribution to holders of common units if the distribution causes our liabilities to exceed the fair value of our assets. Liabilities to partners on account of their partnership interests and nonrecourse liabilities are not counted for purposes of determining whether a distribution is permitted. Delaware law provides that a limited partner who receives such a distribution and knew at the time of the distribution that the distribution violated Delaware law will be liable to the limited partnership for the distribution amount for three years from the distribution date.
Additionally, under Delaware law an assignee who becomes a substituted limited partner of a limited partnership is liable for the obligations, if any, of the assignor to make contributions to the partnership. However, such an assignee is not obligated for liabilities unknown to him or her at the time he or she became a limited partner if the liabilities could not be determined from the partnership agreement.


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We may be subject to the pension liabilities of our affiliates.
Mr. Icahn, through certain affiliates, currently owns 100% of API and approximately 90.0% of our outstanding depositary units and 86.5% of our outstanding preferred units. Applicable pension and tax laws make each member of a “controlled group” of entities, generally defined as entities in which there are at least an 80% common ownership interest, jointly and severally liable for certain pension plan obligations of any member of the controlled group. These pension obligations include ongoing contributions to fund the plan, as well as liability for any unfunded liabilities that may exist at the time the plan is terminated. In addition, the failure to pay these pension obligations when due may result in the creation of liens in favor of the pension plan or the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, or the PBGC, against the assets of each member of the controlled group.
As a result of the more than 80% ownership interest in us by Mr. Icahn’s affiliates, we and our subsidiaries are subject to the pension liabilities of all entities in which Mr. Icahn has a direct or indirect ownership interest of at least 80%. One such entity, ACF Industries LLC, is the sponsor of several pension plans which, as of December 31, 2006, were not underfunded on an ongoing actuarial basis but would be underfunded by approximately $87.2 million if those plans were terminated, as most recently reported by the plans’ actuaries. These liabilities could increase or decrease, depending on a number of factors, including future changes in promised benefits, investment returns, and the assumptions used to calculate the liability. As members of the controlled group, we would be liable for any failure of ACF to make ongoing pension contributions or to pay the unfunded liabilities upon a termination of the ACF pension plans. In addition, other entities now or in the future within the controlled group that includes us may have pension plan obligations that are, or may become, underfunded and we would be liable for any failure of such entities to make ongoing pension contributions or to pay the unfunded liabilities upon a termination of such plans.
The current underfunded status of the ACF pension plans requires ACF to notify the PBGC of certain “reportable events,” such as if we cease to be a member of the ACF controlled group, or if we make certain extraordinary dividends or stock redemptions. The obligation to report could cause us to seek to delay or reconsider the occurrence of such reportable events.
Starfire Holding Corporation, which is 100% owned by Mr. Icahn, has undertaken to indemnify us and our subsidiaries from losses resulting from any imposition of certain pension funding or termination liabilities that may be imposed on us and our subsidiaries or our assets as a result of being a member of the Icahn controlled group. The Starfire indemnity (which does not extend to pension liabilities of our subsidiaries that would be imposed on us as a result of our interest in these subsidiaries and not as a result of Mr. Icahn and his affiliates more than 80% ownership interest in us) provides, among other things, that so long as such contingent liabilities exist and could be imposed on us, Starfire will not make any distributions to its stockholders that would reduce its net worth to below $250.0 million. Nonetheless, Starfire may not be able to fund its indemnification obligations to us.
We are subject to the risk of possibly becoming an investment company.
Because we are a holding company and a significant portion of our assets may, from time to time, consist of investments in companies in which we own less than a 50% interest, we run the risk of inadvertently becoming an investment company that is required to register under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended. Registered investment companies are subject to extensive, restrictive and potentially adverse regulation relating to, among other things, operating methods, management, capital structure, dividends and transactions with affiliates. Registered investment companies are not permitted to operate their business in the manner in which we operate our business, nor are registered investment companies permitted to have many of the relationships that we have with our affiliated companies.
In order not to become an investment company required to register under the Investment Company Act, we monitor the value of our investments and structure transactions with an eye toward the Investment Company Act. As a result, we may structure transactions in a less advantageous manner than if we did not have Investment Company Act concerns, or we may avoid otherwiseeconomically desirable transactions due to those concerns. In addition, events beyond our control, including significant appreciation or depreciation in the market value of certain of our publicly traded holdings or adverse developments with respect to our ownership of certain of our subsidiaries, such as our loss of control of WPI, could result in our inadvertently becoming an investment company. See Note 20of notes to consolidated financial statements and Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
If it were established that we were an investment company, there would be a risk, among other material adverse consequences, that we could become subject to monetary penalties or injunctive relief, or both, in an action brought


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by the SEC, that we would be unable to enforce contracts with third parties or that third parties could seek to obtain rescission of transactions with us undertaken during the period it was established that we were an unregistered investment company.
We may become taxable as a corporation.
We believe that we have been and are properly treated as a partnership for federal income tax purposes. This allows us to pass through our income and deductions to our partners. However, the Internal Revenue Service, or IRS, could challenge our partnership status and we could fail to qualify as a partnership for past years as well as future years. Qualification as a partnership involves the application of highly technical and complex provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. For example, a publicly traded partnership is generally taxable as a corporation unless 90% or more of its gross income is “qualifying” income, which includes interest, dividends, oil and gas revenues, real property rents, gains from the sale or other disposition of real property, gain from the sale or other disposition of capital assets held for the production of interest or dividends, and certain other items. We believe that in all prior years of our existence at least 90% of our gross income was qualifying income and we intend to structure our business in a manner such that at least 90% of our gross income will constitute qualifying income this year and in the future. However, there can be no assurance that such structuring will be effective in all events to avoid the receipt of more than 10% of non-qualifying income. If less than 90% of our gross income constitutes qualifying income, we may be subject to corporate tax on our net income, at a Federal rate of up to 35% plus possible state taxes. Further, if less than 90% of our gross income constituted qualifying income for past years, we may be subject to corporate level tax plus interest and possibly penalties. In addition, if we register under the Investment Company Act of 1940, it is likely that we would be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The cost of paying federal and possibly state income tax, either for past years or going forward, could be a significant liability and would reduce our funds available to make distributions to holders of units, and to make interest and principal payments on our debt securities. To meet the qualifying income test we may structure transactions in a manner which is less advantageous than if this were not a consideration, or we avoid otherwise economically desirable transactions.
Holders of units may be required to pay tax on their share of our income even if they did not receive cash distributions from us.
Because we are treated as a partnership for income tax purposes, holders of units are generally required to pay federal income tax, and, in some cases, state or local income tax, on the portion of our taxable income allocated to them, whether or not such income is distributed. Accordingly, it is possible that holder of units may not receive cash distributions from us equal to their share of our taxable income, or even equal to their tax liability on the portion of our income allocated to them.
If we discover significant deficiencies in our internal controls over financial reporting or at any recently acquired entity, it may adversely affect our ability to provide timely and reliable financial information and satisfy our reporting obligations under federal securities laws, which also could affect the market price of our depositary units or our ability to remain listed with the New York Stock Exchange.
Effective internal and disclosure controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and effectively prevent fraud and to operate successfully as a public company. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our reputation and operating results would be harmed. As of December 31, 2006, we completed remediation of previously reported significant deficiencies in internal controls, as defined under interim standards adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB; two at the Holding Company and one at a subsidiary. A “significant deficiency” is a control deficiency, or combination of control deficiencies, that adversely affects a company’s ability to initiate, authorize, record, process, or report external financial data reliably in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles such that there is a more than remote likelihood that a misstatement of a company’s annual or interim financial statements that is more than inconsequential will not be prevented or detected.
To the extent that any material weakness or significant deficiency exists in our or our consolidated subsidiaries internal control over financial reporting, such material weakness or significant deficiency may adversely affect our ability to provide timely and reliable financial information necessary for the conduct of our business and satisfaction of our reporting obligations under federal securities laws, which could affect our ability to remain listed with the New York Stock Exchange. Ineffective internal and disclosure controls could cause investors to lose confidence in


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our reported financial information, which could have a negative effect on the trading price of our depositary units or the rating of our debt.
Since we are a limited partnership, you may not be able to pursue legal claims against us in U.S. federal courts.
We are a limited partnership organized under the laws of the state of Delaware. Under the rules of federal civil procedure, you may not be able to sue us in federal court on claims other than those based solely on federal law, because of lack of complete diversity. Case law applying diversity jurisdiction deems us to have the citizenship of each of our limited partners. Because we are a publicly traded limited partnership, it may not be possible for you to attempt to sue us in a federal court because we have citizenship in all 50 U.S. states and operations in many states. Accordingly, you will be limited to bring any claims in state court. Furthermore, AREP Finance, our corporate co-issuer for the notes, has only nominal assets and no operations. While you may be able to sue the corporate co., issuer in a federal court, you are not likely to be able to realize on any judgment rendered against it.
Our failure to comply with the covenants contained under one of our debt instruments or the indenture governing the notes, including our failure as a result of events beyond our control, could result in an event of default which would materially and adversely affect our financial condition.
If there were an event of default under one of our debt instruments, the holders of the defaulted debt could cause all amounts outstanding with respect to that debt to be due and payable immediately. In addition, any event of default or declaration of acceleration under one debt instrument could result in an event of default under one or more of our other debt instruments, including the notes. It is possible that, if the defaulted debt is accelerated, our assets and cash flow may not be sufficient to fully repay borrowings under our outstanding debt instruments and we cannot assure you that we would be able to refinance or restructure the payments on those debt securities.
To service our indebtedness, we will require a significant amount of cash. Our ability to maintain our current cash position or generate cash depends on many factors beyond our control.
Our ability to make payments on and to refinance our indebtedness, including the notes, and to fund operations will depend on existing cash balances and our ability to generate cash in the future. This, to a certain extent, is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control.
The businesses or assets we currently operate or may acquire may not generate sufficient cash to service our debt, including the notes. In addition, we may not generate sufficient cash flow from operations or investments and future borrowings may not be available to us in an amount sufficient to enable us to service our indebtedness, including the notes, or to fund our other liquidity needs. We may need to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness, including the notes, on or before maturity. We cannot assure you that we will be able to refinance any of our indebtedness, including the notes, on commercially reasonable terms or at all.
Risks Related to our Businesses
General
In addition to the following risk factors specific to each of our businesses, all of our businesses are subject to the effects of the following:
·
the continued threat of terrorism;
·
economic downturn;
·
loss of any of our or our subsidiaries key personnel;
·
the unavailability, as needed, of additional financing; and
·
the unavailability of insurance at acceptable rates.
Our acquisition of Lear Corporation will require a significant investment or may not be successfully completed.
On February 9, 2007, we entered into an agreement and plan of merger, pursuant to which we would acquire Lear, a publicly traded company that provides automotive interior systems worldwide for aggregate consideration of


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approximately $5.2 billion including the assumption of debt. If we complete the acquisition of Lear, it would require a significant investment by us, including approximately $1.4 billion in cash. Under the financial tests contained in the indentures that govern our notes due 2012 and 2013, AREP and AREH will not be able to incur additional indebtedness as a result of borrowings to finance the Lear acquisition, which may limit our flexibility in entering into future financing arrangements, including those to support our existing businesses or to acquire new businesses. Lear also has significant pension and related liabilities for which we could become liable as a member of a controlled group of entities.
Our agreement with Lear permits Lear to solicit proposals from other potential purchasers for 45 days after the signing of the agreement and to respond to offers after that date and until Lear’s stockholders approve the transaction with us. We cannot assure you that we will be able to complete the transaction or that the completion of the transaction will be for the consideration described above.
Furthermore, the proposed transaction is subject to additional risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, the satisfaction of conditions to closing, which requires Lear stockholder approval and U.S. and foreign antitrust approval. If we were to complete the acquisition, Lear's business and operations would be subject to various risks, including the uncertainty of its financial performance following completion of the proposed transaction; general conditions affecting the automotive industry, particularly in the United States, and general domestic and international market conditions.
In addition, we have been named as a co-defendant in actions brought on behalf of Lear stockholders that, among other things, allege that the purchase price is unfair to Lear stockholders and seek to enjoin the transaction. See Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Gaming
The gaming industry is highly regulated. The gaming authorities and state and municipal licensing authorities have significant control over our operations.
Our properties currently conduct licensed gaming operations in Nevada. Various regulatory authorities, including the Nevada State Gaming Control Board and the Nevada Gaining Commission, require our properties to hold various licenses and registrations, findings of suitability, permits and approvals to engage in gaming operations and to meet requirements of suitability. These gaming authorities also control approval of ownership interests in gaming operations. These gaming authorities may deny, limit, condition, suspend or revoke our gaming licenses, registrations, findings of suitability or the approval of any of our ownership interests in any of or licensed gaming operations any of which could have a significant adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations, for any cause they may deem reasonable. If we violate gaming laws or regulations that are applicable to us, we may have to pay substantial fines or forfeit assets. If, in the future, we operate or have an ownership interest in casino gaming facilities located outside of Nevada, we may also be subject to the gaming laws and regulations of those other jurisdictions.
The sale of alcoholic beverages at our Gaming properties is subject to licensing and regulation by local authorities. Any limitation, condition, suspension or revocation of any such license, and any disciplinary action may, and revocation would, reduce the number of visitors to our casinos to the extent the availability of alcoholic beverages is important to them. Any reduction in our number of visitors will reduce our revenue and cash flow.
Rising operating costs for our gaming properties could have a negative impact on our profitability.
The operating expenses associated with our gaming properties could increase due to some of the following factors:
·
our properties use significant amounts of electricity, natural gas and other forms of energy, and energy price increases may reduce our profitability;
·
our properties use significant amounts of water and a water shortage may adversely affect our operations;
·
some of our employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements and we may incur higher costs or work slow-downs or stoppages due to union activities; and
·
our reliance on slot machine revenues and the concentration of manufacturing of slot machines in certain companies could impose additional costs on us.


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We face substantial competition in the gaming industry.
The gaming industry in general, and the markets in which we compete in particular, are highly competitive:
·
we compete with many world-class destination resorts with greater name recognition, different attractions, amenities and entertainment options;
·
we compete with the continued growth of gaming on Native American tribal lands;
·
the existence of legalized gambling in other jurisdictions may reduce the number of visitors to our properties;
·
certain states have legalized, and others may legalize, casino gaming in specific venues, including race tracks and/or in specific areas, including metropolitan areas from which we traditionally attract customers; and
·
our properties also compete, and will in the future compete, with all forms of legalized gambling.
Many of our competitors have greater financial, selling and marketing, technical and other resources than we do. We may not be able to compete effectively with our competitors and we may lose market share, which could reduce our revenue and cash flow.
We cannot guarantee that we will be able to recover our investment made in connection with the acquisition of the Aquarius.
On May 19, 2006, our wholly-owned subsidiary, AREP Laughlin, acquired the Aquarius from affiliates of Harrah’s for approximately $113.6 million, including working capital.
We currently plan to spend approximately $40.0 million through 2008 to refurbish rooms, upgrade amenities and acquire new gaming equipment for the Aquarius. Acquisitions generally involve significant risks, including difficulties in the assimilation of the operations, services and corporate culture of the acquired company.
Net revenues and operating income for the Aquarius from its acquisition in May 2006 through December 31, 2006 have decreased from the same period in 2005, when it was operated as a division of Harrah’s Operating Company, Inc., primarily due to disruptions to the gaming floor related to construction, upgrading of facilities and the implementation of new marketing programs intended to change the Aquarius’ customer mix. The casino construction program was substantially completed in 2006. We plan to refurbish rooms in 2007 and 2008.
There can be no assurance that this acquisition will be profitable or that we will be able to recover our investments.
Operating results for our Gaming segment have been adversely affected by a number of factors that have affected and may continue to affect results.
Net income for our Gaming segment for the year ended December 31, 2006 decreased from the year ended December 31, 2005. We attribute this decrease to a number of factors, including, but not limited to, increased gas prices, which affect traffic to Las Vegas and Laughlin, disruption from construction at the Stratosphere, the Aquarius and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder, the entrance of a new competitor in the market served by Arizona Charlie’s Decatur and decreased net revenues and operating income at the Aquarius. These factors have affected and may continue to affect our gaming segment’s operating results.
Real Estate Operations
Our investment in property development may be more costly than anticipated.
We have invested and expect to continue to invest in unentitled land, undeveloped land and distressed development properties. These properties involve more risk than properties on which development has been completed. Unentitled land may not be approved for development. These investments do not generate any operating revenue, while costs are incurred to obtain government approvals and develop the properties. Construction may not be completed within budget or as scheduled and projected rental levels or sales prices may not be achieved and other


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unpredictable contingencies beyond our control could occur. We will not be able to recoup any of such costs until such time as these properties, or parcels thereof, are either disposed of or developed into income producing assets.
We may be subject to environmental liability as an owner or operator of development and rental real estate.
Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, an owner or operator of real property may become liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous substances, pollutants and contaminants released on, under, in or from its property. These laws often impose liability without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the release of such substances. To the extent any such substances are found in or on any property invested in by us, we could be exposed to liability and be required to incur substantial remediation costs. The presence of such substances or the failure to undertake proper remediation may adversely affect the ability to finance, refinance or dispose of such property. We generally conduct a Phase I environmental site assessment on properties in which we are considering investing. A Phase I environmental site assessment involves record review, visual site assessment and personnel interviews, but does not typically include invasive testing procedures such as air, soil or groundwater sampling or other tests performed as part of a Phase II environmental site assessment. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that these assessments will disclose all potential liabilities or that future property uses or conditions or changes in applicable environmental laws and regulations or activities at nearby properties will not result in the creation of environmental liabilities with respect to a property.
Home Fashion Operations
Pending bankruptcy proceedings may result in our ownership of WPI’s common stock being reduced to less than 50%. A legal action in Delaware challenges our ownership of the preferred stock of WPI. Uncertainties arising from these proceedings may adversely affect WPI’s operations and prospects and the value of our investment in it.
We currently own approximately 67.7% of the outstanding shares of common stock and 100% of the preferred stock of WPI. As a result of the decision of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York reversing certain provisions of the Bankruptcy Court order pursuant to which we acquired our ownership of a majority of the common stock of WPI, the proceedings in the Bankruptcy Court on remand, and the proceedings in the Delaware action, our percentage of the outstanding shares of common stock of WPI could be reduced to less than 50% and perhaps substantially less and our ownership of the preferred stock of WPI could also be affected. If we were to lose control of WPI, it could adversely affect the business and prospects of WPI and the value of our investment in it. In addition, we consolidated the balance sheet of WPI as of December 31, 2006 and 2005 and WPI’s results of operations for the period from the date of acquisition through December 31, 2006. If we were to own less than 50% of the outstanding common stock or the challenge to our preferred stock ownership is successful, we would have to evaluate whether we should consolidate WPI and if so our financial statements could be materially different than as presented as of December 31, 2006 and December 31, 2005 and for the periods then ended. See Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
WPI acquired its business from the former owners through bankruptcy proceedings. We cannot assure you that it will be able to operate profitably.
WPI acquired the assets of WestPoint Stevens as part of its bankruptcy proceedings. Certain of the issues that contributed to WestPoint Stevens’ filing for bankruptcy, such as intense industry competition, the inability to produce goods at a cost competitive with overseas suppliers, the increasing prevalence of direct sourcing by principal customers and continued incurrence of overhead costs associated with an enterprise larger than the current business can profitably support, continue to exist and may continue to affect WPI’s business operations and financial condition adversely. In addition, during the protracted bankruptcy proceedings of WestPoint Stevens, several of its customers reduced the volume of business done with WestPoint Stevens. We have installed new management to address these issues, but we cannot assure you that new management will be effective.
WPI operated at a loss during 2006 and we expect that WPI will continue to operate at a loss during 2007. We cannot assure you that it will be able to operate profitably in the future.


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The loss of any of WPI’s large customers could have an adverse effect on WPI’s business.
During 2006 and 2005, WPI’s six largest customers accounted for approximately 50% and 51%, respectively, of its net sales (including net sales by WestPoint Stevens). Other retailers have indicated that they intend to significantly increase their direct sourcing of home fashion products from foreign sources. The loss of any of WPI’s largest accounts, or a material portion of sales to those accounts, would have an adverse effect upon its business, which could be material.
A portion of WPI’s sales are derived from licensed designer brands. The loss of a significant license could have an adverse effect on WPI’s business.
A portion of WPI’s sales is derived from licensed designer brands. The license agreements for WPI’s designer brands generally are for a term of two or three years. Some of the licenses are automatically renewable for additional periods, provided that sales thresholds set forth in the license agreements are met. The loss of a significant license could have an adverse effect upon WPI’s business, which effect could be material. Under certain circumstances, these licenses can be terminated without WPI’s consent due to circumstances beyond WPI’s control.
A shortage of the principal raw materials WPI uses to manufacture its products could force WPI to pay more for those materials and, possibly, cause WPI to increase its prices, which could have an adverse effect on WPI’s operations.
Any shortage in the raw materials WPI uses to manufacture its products could adversely affect its operations. The principal raw materials that WPI uses in the manufacture of its products are cotton of various grades and staple lengths and polyester and nylon in staple and filament form. Since cotton is an agricultural product, its supply and quality are subject to weather patterns, disease and other factors. The price of cotton is also influenced by supply and demand considerations, both domestically and worldwide, and by the cost of polyester. Although WPI has been able to acquire sufficient quantities of cotton for its operations in the past, any shortage in the cotton supply by reason of weather patterns, disease or other factors, or a significant increase in the price of cotton, could adversely affect its operations. The price of man-made fibers, such as polyester and nylon, is influenced by demand, manufacturing capacity and costs, petroleum prices, cotton prices and the cost of polymers used in producing these fibers. In particular, the effect of increased energy prices may have a direct impact upon the cost of dye and chemicals, polyester and other synthetic fibers. Any significant prolonged petrochemical shortages could significantly affect the availability of man-made fibers and could cause a substantial increase in demand for cotton. This could result in decreased availability of cotton and possibly increased prices and could adversely affect WPI’s operations.
The home fashion industry is highly competitive and WPI’s success depends on WPI’s ability to compete effectively in the market.
The home fashion industry is highly competitive. WPI’s future success will, to a large extent, depend on its ability to remain a low-cost producer and to remain competitive. WPI competes with both foreign and domestic companies on, among other factors, the basis of price, quality and customer service. In the home fashion market, WPI competes with many companies. WPI’s future success depends on its ability to remain competitive in the areas of marketing, product development, price, quality, brand names, manufacturing capabilities, distribution and order processing. We cannot assure you of WPI’s ability to compete effectively in any of these areas. Any failure to compete effectively could adversely affect WPI’s sales and, accordingly, its operations. Additionally, the easing of trade restrictions over time has led to growing competition from low priced products imported from Asia and Latin America. The lifting of import quotas in 2005 has accelerated the loss of WPI’s market share. There can be no assurance that the foreign competition will not grow to a level that could have an adverse effect upon WPI’s ability to compete effectively.
WPI intends to increase the percentage of its products that are made overseas. There is no assurance that WPI will be successful in obtaining goods of sufficient quality on a timely basis and on advantageous terms. WPI will be subject to additional risks relating to doing business overseas.
WPI intends to increase the percentage of its products that are made overseas and may face additional risks associated with these efforts. Adverse factors that WPI may encounter include:
·
logistical challenges caused by distance;


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·
language and cultural differences;
·
legal and regulatory restrictions;
·
the difficulty of enforcing agreements with overseas suppliers;
·
currency exchange rate fluctuations;
·
political and economic instability; and
·
potential adverse tax consequences.
There has been consolidation of retailers of WPI’s products that may reduce its profitability.
Retailers of consumer goods have become fewer and more powerful over time. As buying power has become more concentrated, pricing pressure on vendors has grown. With the ability to buy imported products directly from foreign sources, retailers’ pricing leverage has increased and also allowed for growth in private label brands that displace and compete with WPI proprietary brands. Retailers’ pricing leverage has resulted in a decline in WPI’s unit pricing and margins and resulted in a shift in product mix to more private label programs. If WPI is unable to diminish the decline in its pricing and margins, it may not be able to achieve or maintain profitability.
WPI is subject to various federal, state and local environmental and health and safety laws and regulations. If it does not comply with these regulations, it may incur significant costs in the future to become compliant.
WPI is subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations governing, among other things, the discharge, storage, handling, usage and disposal of a variety of hazardous and non-hazardous substances and wastes used in, or resulting from, its operations, including potential remediation obligations under those laws and regulations. WPI’s operations are also governed by federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to employee safety and health which, among other things, establish exposure limitations for cotton dust, formaldehyde, asbestos and noise, and which regulate chemical, physical and ergonomic hazards in the workplace. Consumer product safety laws, regulations and standards at the federal and state level govern the manufacture and sale of products by WPI. Although WPI does not expect that compliance with any of these laws and regulations will adversely affect its operations, we cannot assure you that regulatory requirements will not become more stringent in the future or that WPI will not incur significant costs to comply with those requirements.
Investments
We may not be able to identify suitable investments, and our investments may not result in favorable returns or mayresult in losses.
Our partnership agreement allows us to take advantage of investment opportunities we believe exist outside of our operating businesses. The equity securities in which we may invest may include common stocks, preferred stocks and securities convertible into common stocks, as well as warrants to purchase these securities. The debt securities in which we may invest may include bonds, debentures, notes, or non-rated mortgage-related securities, municipal obligations, bank debt and mezzanine loans. Certain of these securities may include lower rated or non-rated securities which may provide the potential for higher yields and therefore may entail higher risk and may include the securities of bankrupt or distressed companies. In addition, we may engage in various investment techniques, including derivatives, options and futures transactions, foreign currency transactions, “short” sales and leveraging for either hedging or other purposes. We may concentrate our activities by owning a significant or controlling interest in certain investments. We may not be successful in finding suitable opportunities to invest our cash and our strategy of investing in undervalued assets may expose us to numerous risks.
Our investments may be subject to significant uncertainties.
Our investments may not be successful for many reasons including, but not limited to:
·
fluctuation of interest rates;
·
lack of control in minority investments;
·
worsening of general economic and market conditions;


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·
lack of diversification;
·
fluctuation of U.S. dollar exchange rates; and
·
adverse legal and regulatory developments that may affect particular businesses.
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
There are no unresolved SEC staff comments.
Item 2. Properties.
Gaming
Las Vegas
We own and operate the Stratosphere Casino Hotel & Tower, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, which is centered around the Stratosphere Tower, the tallest free-standing observation tower in the United States. The hotel and entertainment facility is located on 34 acres, has 2,444 rooms and suites, an 80,000 square foot casino and related amenities.
We own Arizona Charlie’s Decatur and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder. Arizona Charlie’s Decatur is located on 17 acres, has 258 hotel rooms and a 52,000 square foot casino and related amenities. Arizona Charlie’s Boulder is located on 24 acres, has 303 hotel rooms and a 47,000 square foot casino and related amenities.
Laughlin
The Aquarius owns approximately 18 acres located next to the Colorado River in Laughlin, Nevada and is a tourist-oriented gaming and entertainment destination property. The Aquarius features the largest hotel in Laughlin with 1,907 hotel rooms, a 57,000 square foot casino, seven dining options, 2,420 parking spaces, over 35,000 square feet of meeting space and a 3,300-seat outdoor amphitheater.
Real Estate
Rental Real Estate
As of December 31, 2006, we owned 37 separate real estate properties, excluding our real estate development, hotel and resort operations, hotel and casino operations and properties related to our home fashion operations. These primarily consist of fee and leasehold interests in 19 states. Most of these properties are net-leased to single corporate tenants. Approximately 89% of these properties are currently net-leased, 3% are operating properties and 8% are vacant.
Real Estate Development
We own, primarily through our subsidiary, Bayswater Development LLC, residential development properties. Bayswater, a real estate investment, management and development company, focuses primarily on the construction and sale of single-family houses, multi-family homes and lots in subdivisions and planned communities and raw land for residential development.
Our New Seabury Resort in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, includes land for future residential and commercial development. We developed and sold 37 homes and are continuing construction and sales on the additional phases of our approximately 457-unit residential development.
We own the waterfront communities of Grand Harbor and Oak Harbor in Vero Beach, Florida. These communities include properties in various stages of development. We also own 400 acres of developable land adjacent to Grand Harbor.
We also own and are developing residential communities in Westchester County, New York and Naples, Florida.


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Hotel and Resort Operations
We own the New Seabury resort in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The resort is comprised of a golf club, with two championship golf courses, the Popponesset Inn, a private beach club, a fitness center and a tennis facility.
We also own three golf courses, a tennis complex, fitness center, beach club and clubhouses and an assisted living facility located adjacent to the Intercoastal Waterway in Vero Beach, Florida.
Home Fashion
WPI’s properties are indirectly owned or leased through its subsidiaries. Its properties include approximately 86,600 square feet of office, showroom and design space in New York, New York. WPI leases approximately 33,000 square feet elsewhere for other administrative, storage and office space. WPI owns and utilizes eight manufacturing facilities located in Alabama, Florida, Maine and North Carolina which contain, in the aggregate, approximately 3.1 million square feet. WPI leases and utilizes three manufacturing facilities which contain, in the aggregate, approximately 378,000 square feet. In 2006, WPI closed its Calhoun Falls, SC; Clemson Complex, SC; Lanett, AL; Opelika Greige, AL and Scotland Greige facilities. These closures brought the number of operating manufacturing facilities to eight.
WPI also owns a chemical plant in Opelika, Alabama containing approximately 43,000 square feet of floor space and operates a fleet of tractors and trailers from a company-owned transportation center in Valley, Alabama containing approximately 25,000 square feet of floor space. In addition, WPI owns a printing facility in West Point, Georgia consisting of approximately 38,000 square feet at which product packaging and labeling are printed.
In December 2006, WPI purchased a manufacturing facility in Bahrain containing approximately 764,000 square feet. The facility is located on land leased from the Kingdom of Bahrain under various long-term leases.
WPI owns and operates ten distribution centers and warehouses for its operations which contain, in the aggregate, approximately three million square feet of floor space and leases and operates three distribution outlets and warehouses containing approximately 500,000 square feet of floor space. In addition, WPI owns two retail outlet stores and leases 29 other retail stores which range in size from approximately 9,000 square feet to approximately 38,000 square feet.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
We are from time to time parties to various legal proceedings arising out of our businesses. We believe however, that other than the proceedings discussed below, there are no proceedings pending or threatened against us which, if determined adversely, would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or liquidity.
Lear Corporation
We have been named as a defendant in various actions recently filed in connection with our agreement and plan of merger to acquire Lear Corporation. The following actions have been filed in the Court of Chancery of State of Delaware, New Castle County: Market Street Securities, Inc. v. Rossiter, et al.; Harry Massie, Jr. v. Lear Corporation, et al.; and Classic Fund Management AG v. Lear Corporation, et al. These actions are purported class actions filed on behalf of stockholders of Lear and have been consolidated into a single action that names as defendants Lear, us and certain of our affiliates and one of our directors who serves on the board of Lear, alleging generally that we and our named affiliates aided and abetted the Lear directors’ claimed breaches of their fiduciary duties to the stockholders of Lear. On February 23, 2007, the plaintiffs in the consolidated Delaware action filed a consolidated amended complaint, a motion for expedited proceedings and a motion to preliminarily enjoin our proposed merger with Lear. The Delaware Court of Chancery has stated that it will hear the parties on March 27, 2007 to determine whether a motion for a preliminary injunction should be scheduled.
The following actions have been filed in the Circuit Court for Oakland County, Michigan: Louis Carulli v. Lear Corp et al.; Emilio Valentine v. Lear Corp et al.; and Jeanette Ciambella  v. Lear Corp. et al. These actions are also purported class actions on behalf of stockholders of Lear that assert claims against us, and one of our directors who


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also serves on the board of Lear. The allegations in these actions are generally similar to those asserted in the Delaware lawsuits.
On March 1, 2007, we and two of our directors were named as defendants in a purported class action lawsuit filed in the United States District Court in Detroit, Michigan as a purported class action on behalf of participants in certain of Lear’s stock option plans, alleging that members of Lear's board of directors breached their fiduciary duties to the employees as owners of shares of the stock of Lear and that the transaction violates the Employment Retirement Income Security Act.
We intend to vigorously defend against these claims.
WPI Litigation
In November and December 2005, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York rendered a decision in Contrarian Funds Inc. v. WestPoint Stevens, Inc. et al., and issued orders reversing certain provisions of the Bankruptcy Court order, or the Sale Order, pursuant to which we acquired our ownership of a majority of the common stock of WPI. WPI acquired substantially all of the assets of WestPoint Stevens, Inc. On April 13, 2006, the Bankruptcy Court entered a remand order, or the Remand Order, which provides, among other things, that all of the shares of common stock and rights to acquire shares of common stock of WPI issued to us and the other first lien lenders or held in escrow pursuant to the Sale Order constituted “replacement collateral”, other than 5,250,000 shares of common stock that we acquired for cash. The 5,250,000 shares represent approximately 27% of the 19,498,389 shares of common stock of WPI now outstanding. According to the Remand Order, we would share pro rata with the other first lien lenders in proceeds realized from the disposition of the replacement collateral and, to the extent there is remaining replacement collateral after satisfying first lien lender claims, we would share pro rata with the other second lien lenders in any further proceeds. We were holders of approximately 39.99% of the outstanding first lien debt and approximately 51.21% of the outstanding second lien debt. On April 13, 2006, the Bankruptcy Court also entered an order staying the Remand Order pending appeal. The parties filed cross-appeals of the Remand Order and Contrarian Funds and certain other first lien lenders, or the Contrarian Group, filed a motion to lift the stay of the Remand Order pending appeal. Oral argument was held in the District Court on October 19, 2006. As of the date hereof, no decision has been issued.
On December 11, 2006, the Contrarian Group filed a motion in the District Court seeking a temporary restraining order, or the NY TRO, restraining WPI from proceeding with a stockholders’ meeting scheduled for December 20, 2006, which was to consider corporate actions relating to a proposed offering of $200 million of preferred stock of WPI, and for related relief. The District Court held a hearing on December 15, 2006, at which it entered an order denying the Contrarian Group’s application for the NY TRO.
On December 18, 2006, the Contrarian Group filed an action in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware, New Castle County, Contrarian Funds, LLC, et al v. WestPoint International Inc., et al., seeking, among other things, a temporary order restraining the stockholders’ meeting and the preferred stock offering. The application was denied by order dated December 19, 2006. The stockholders’ meeting took place on December 20, 2006, the preferred stock offering was approved, and other corporate actions were taken. We purchased all of the $200.0 million of preferred stock.
On January 19, 2007, Beal Bank and the Contrarian Group filed an Amended Complaint, captioned Beal Bank, S.S.B. et al v. WestPoint International, Inc., et al. Plaintiffs seek, among other relief, an order declaring that WPI is obliged to register the common stock (other than the 5,250,000 shares purchased by us) in Beal Bank’s name, an order declaring certain corporate governance changes implemented in 2005 invalid, an order declaring invalid the actions taken at the December 20, 2006 stockholders’ meeting and an order to “unwind” the issuance of the preferred stock, or, alternatively, directing that such preferred stock be held in trust. The Delaware action remains pending and we intend to vigorously defend against such claims.
We currently own 67.7% of the outstanding shares of common stock of WPI. As a result of the District Court’s order in the Bankruptcy case and the proceedings on remand, our percentage of the outstanding shares of common stock of WPI could be reduced to less than 50% and perhaps substantially less. However, neither the District Court order nor the proceedings on remand, involves our ownership of the Series A-1 Preferred Stock or the Series A-2 Preferred Stock. Each series of Preferred Stock is entitled to elect three of the ten directors of WPI’s Board and, as a result of our ownership of the Preferred Stock, we could continue to elect a majority of the Board. In addition, each


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of the Series A-1 Preferred Stock and Series A-2 Preferred Stock is convertible into common shares of WPI at a rate of $10.50 per share, subject to certain anti-dilution provisions, or 19,047,619 shares. If we were to convert all of our shares of preferred stock into common shares, we would continue to own more than a majority of the shares of common stock, based on the number of shares currently outstanding, including 5,250,000 shares of common stock that we acquired for cash and which are not subject to the District Court’s order, even if we were to lose ownership of all other shares of common stock as a result of the District Court order.
If the proceedings in the Bankruptcy Court and in the Delaware action are both adverse to us, our percentage of the outstanding shares of common stock of WPI could be reduced to less than 50%. If we were to lose control of WPI, it could adversely affect the business and prospects of WPI and the value of our investment in it. In addition, we consolidated the balance sheet of WPI as of December 31, 2006 and WPI’s results of operations for the period from the date of acquisition through December 31, 2006. If we were to own less than 50% of the outstanding common stock or the challenge to our preferred stock ownership is successful, we would have to evaluate whether we should consolidate WPI and if so our financial statements could be materially different than as presented as of December 31, 2006 and December 31, 2005 and for the periods then ended.
We cannot predict the outcome of these proceedings or the ultimate impact on our investment in WPI or the business prospects of WPI.
GBH
On September 29, 2005, GBH filed a voluntary petition for bankruptcy relief under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. As a result of this filing, we determined that we no longer control GBH for accounting purposes, and deconsolidated our investment in GBH effective September 30, 2005.
An Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors, or the Committee, of GBH, was formed and on October 13, 2006, was granted standing by the Bankruptcy Court to commence litigation in the name of GBH against us, ACE, Atlantic Coast and other entities affiliated with Carl C. Icahn, as well as the directors of GBH. The Committee challenged the transaction in July 2004 that, among other things, resulted in the transfer of The Sands to ACE, a wholly owned subsidiary of Atlantic Coast, the exchange by certain holders of GBH’s 11% notes for Atlantic Coast 3% senior secured convertible notes due 2008, or the 3% notes, the issuance to the holders of GBH’s common stock of warrants allowing the holders to purchase shares of Atlantic Coast common stock and, ultimately, our ownership of approximately 67.6% of the outstanding shares of Atlantic Coast common stock and ownership by GBH of approximately 30.7% of such stock. We also maintained ownership of approximately 77.5% of the outstanding shares of GBH common stock. The Committee originally filed an objection to the allowance of our claims against GBH. The Bankruptcy Court placed the consideration of the Committee’s Proposed Plan of Liquidation and Disclosure Statement in abeyance until the resolution of the proposed litigation.
Additionally, on September 2, 2005, Robino Stortini Holdings, LLC, or RSH, which claimed to own beneficially 1,652,590 shares of common stock of GBH, filed a complaint in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware against GBH and its Board of Directors seeking appointment of a custodian and receiver for GBH and a declaration that the director defendants breached their fiduciary duties.
During the fourth quarter of 2006, we and other entities affiliated with Mr. Icahn entered into a term sheet with the Committee, GBH and RSH which outlined the resolution of claims relating to the July 2004 transactions. The provisions of the term sheet were incorporated in the Committee’s Eighth Modified Chapter 11 Plan of Liquidation of GBH. On January 30, 2007, the Bankruptcy Court approved the plan. On February 22, 2007, in accordance with the plan, we acquired (1) all of the Atlantic Coast common stock owned by GBH for a cash payment of approximately $52.0 million and in satisfaction of all claims arising under the Loan and Security Agreement, dated as of July 25, 2005, between GBH and us and (2) all of the warrants to acquire Atlantic Coast common stock and the Atlantic Coast common stock owned by RSH for a cash payment of $3.7 million. As a result, Atlantic Coast is our indirect wholly-owned subsidiary. In accordance with the plan, GBH used the $52.0 million to pay amounts owed to its creditors, including the holders of GBH’s 11% notes and holders of administrative claims, and to establish an approximate $330,000 fund to be distributed pro rata to holders of equity interests in GBH other than us and other Icahn affiliated entities. In addition, we and other Icahn affiliated entities received releases of all direct and derivative claims that could be asserted by GBH, its creditors and stockholders, including RSH. All claims relating to GBH asserted by its creditors and RSH have now been resolved.
Item 4. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders.
No matters were submitted to our security holders during the fourth quarter of 2006.


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PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Security Holder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Our depositary units are traded on the New York Stock Exchange, or NYSE, under the symbol “ACP.” The range of high and low sales prices for the depositary units on the New York Stock Exchange Composite Tape (as reported by The Wall Street Journal) for each quarter from January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2006 is as follows:
Quarter Ended:
 
High
 
Low
 
Dividends per
Depositary Unit
 
                                                                                                                                                   
     
 
               
     
 
               
     
   
 
March 31, 2005
 
$
30.78
 
$
25.40
    
$
 
June 30, 2005
   
29.35
   
26.60
   
 
September 30, 2005
   
39.74
   
28.20
   
0.10
 
December 31, 2005
   
39.30
   
28.70
   
0.10
 
March 31, 2006
   
47.37
   
33.54
   
0.10
 
June 30, 2006
   
47.60
   
35.25
   
0.10
 
September 30, 2006
   
54.50
   
40.50
   
0.10
 
December 31, 2006
   
87.98
   
53.40
   
0.10
 
As of December 31, 2006, there were approximately 8,800 record holders of the depositary units.
There were no repurchases of our depositary units during 2005 or 2006.
Distributions
Distribution Policy and Quarterly Distribution
During 2006, we paid four quarterly distributions to holders of our depositary units. Each distribution was $0.10 per depositary unit.
On February 27, 2007 the Board of Directors approved payment of a quarterly cash distribution of $0.10 per unit on its depositary units for the first quarter of 2007 consistent with the distribution policy adopted in 2005. The distribution is payable on March 29, 2007 to depositary unitholders of record at the close of business on March 14, 2007.
The declaration and payment of distributions is reviewed quarterly by our Board of Directors based upon a review of our balance sheet and cash flow, the ratio of current assets to current liabilities, our expected capital and liquidity requirements, the provisions of our partnership agreement and provisions in our financing arrangements governing distributions, and keeping in mind that limited partners subject to U.S. federal income tax have recognized income on our earnings without receiving distributions that could be used to satisfy any resulting tax obligations. The payment of future distributions will be determined by the Board of Directors quarterly, based upon the factors described above and other factors that it deems relevant at the time that declaration of a distribution is considered. There can be no assurance as to whether or in what amounts any future distributions might be paid.
As of March 1, 2007, there were 61,856,830 depositary units and 11,340,243 preferred units outstanding. Trading in the preferred units commenced March 31, 1995 on the NYSE under the symbol “ACP-P.” The preferred units represent limited partner interests in AREP and have certain rights and designations, generally as follows. Each preferred unit has a liquidation preference of $10.00 and entitles the holder to receive distributions payable solely in additional preferred units, at a rate of $0.50 per preferred unit per annum (which is equal to a rate of 5% of the liquidation preference of the unit) payable annually on March 31 of each year, each referred to as a payment date.
On any payment date, with the approval of our audit committee, we may opt to redeem all, but not less than all, of the preferred units for a price, payable either in all cash or by issuance of additional depositary units, equal to the liquidation preference of the preferred units, plus any accrued but unpaid distributions thereon. On March 31, 2010, we must redeem all, but not less than all, of the preferred units on the same terms as any optional redemption.


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On March 31, 2006, we distributed to holders of record of our preferred units as of March 15, 2006, 539,846 additional preferred units. Pursuant to the terms of the preferred units, on February 27, 2007, we declared our scheduled annual preferred unit distribution payable in additional preferred units at the rate of 5% of the liquidation preference of $10.00. The distribution is payable on March 30, 2007 to holders of record as of March 15, 2007. In March 2007, the number of authorized preferred units was increased to 12,100,000.
Each depositary unitholder will be taxed on the unitholder’s allocable share of our taxable income and gains and, with respect to preferred unitholders, accrued guaranteed payments, whether or not any cash is distributed to the unitholder.
Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
The following table summarizes certain of our selected historical consolidated financial data, which you should read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” contained in this annual report on Form 10-K. The selected historical consolidated financial data as of December 31, 2006 and 2005, and for the years ended December 31, 2006, 2005, and 2004, have each been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements at those dates and for those periods, contained elsewhere in this annual report Form 10-K. The selected historical consolidated financial data as of December 31, 2004, 2003 and 2002 and for the years ended December 31, 2003 and 2002 has each been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements at that date and for that period, not contained in this Form 10-K, as adjusted retrospectively for reclassifications of our Oil and Gas and Atlantic City gaming properties as discontinued operations.
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
   
2006
     
2005
     
2004
     
2003
     
2002
 
   
(in 000s, except per unit amounts and ratio)
 
 
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
     
Statement of Operations Data:
                               
Total revenues
 
$
1,477,930
 
$
900,962
 
$
361,538
 
$
309,213
 
$
358,109
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations
 
$
23,069
 
$
(22,656
)   
$
65,176
 
$
42,415
 
$
53,046
 
Total income (loss) from discontinued operations
 
$
775,764
 
$
(3,013
)
$
88,578
 
$
26,005
 
$
(4,320
)
Earnings (loss) before cumulative effect of
accounting change
 
$
798,833
 
$
(25,669
)
$
153,754
 
$
68,420
 
$
48,726
 
Cumulative effect of accounting change
   
   
   
   
1,912
   
 
Net earnings (loss)
 
$
798,833
 
$
(25,669
)
$
153,754
 
$
70,332
 
$
48,726
 
Net earnings (loss) attributable to:
         
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
Limited partners
 
$
782,936
 
$
(20,292
)
$
130,850
 
$
51,074
 
$
63,168
 
General partner
   
15,897
   
(5,377
)
 
22,904
   
19,258
   
(14,442
)
Net earnings (loss)
 
$
798,833
 
$
(25,669
)
$
153,754
 
$
70,332
 
$
48,726
 
Basic earnings:
         
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations per
LP Unit
 
$
0.40
 
$
(0.31
)
$
0.96
 
$
0.50
 
$
1.37
 
Income from (loss) discontinued operations per
LP Unit
   
12.29
   
(0.05
)
 
1.88
   
0.55
   
(0.10
)
Basic earnings (loss) per LP Unit
 
$
12.69
 
$
(0.36
)
$
2.84
 
$
1.05
 
$
1.27
 
Weighted average limited partnership units outstanding
   
61,857
   
54,085
   
46,098
   
46,098
   
46,098
 
Diluted earnings:
         
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations
 
$
0.40
 
$
(0.31
)
$
0.95
 
$
0.50
 
$
1.20
 
Income (loss) from discontinued operations per
LP Unit
   
12.29
   
(0.05
)
 
1.69
   
0.55
   
(0.08
)
Diluted earnings (loss) per LP Unit
 
$
12,69
 
$
(0.36
)
$
2.64
 
$
1.05
 
$
1.12
 
Weighted average limited partnership units and equivalent partnership units outstanding
   
61,857
   
54,085
   
51,542
   
46,098
   
56,467
 
Other financial data:
         
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 
EBITDA(1)
 
$
1,138,763
 
$
254,100
   
341,647
 
$
171,806
 
$
149,499
 
Adjusted EBITDA(1)
 
$
1,039,056
 
$
323,354
   
350,826
 
$
174,420
 
$
153,107
 
Cash dividends declared (per LP Unit)
 
$
0.40
   
0.20
   
   
   
 
Ratio of earnings to fixed charges(2)
   
   
   
2.6
   
2.0
   
2.2
 


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As of December 31,
   
2006
     
2005
     
2004
     
2003(1)
     
2002
   
(in $000s)
Balance sheet data:
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
1,912,235
 
$
460,091
 
$
762,708
 
$
487,498
 
$
79,540
Investments
   
719,047
   
820,817
   
350,527
   
167,727
   
395,495
Property, plant and equipment, net
   
907,071
   
749,712
   
580,428
   
597,487
   
735,236
Total assets
   
4,244,747
   
3,963,545
   
2,861,153
   
2,156,892
   
2,002,493
Long term debt (including current portion and debt related to assets held for sale)
   
1,208,960
   
1,435,821
   
759,807
   
374,421
   
435,675
Liability for preferred limited partnership units(3)
   
117,656
   
112,067
   
106,731
   
101,649
   
Partners’ equity
   
2,310,655
   
1,495,532
   
1,641,755
   
1,527,396
   
1,387,253
——————
(1)
EBITDA represents earnings before interest expense, income tax (benefit) expense and depreciation, depletion and amortization. We define Adjusted EBITDA as EBITDA excluding the effect of unrealized losses or gains on derivative contracts. We present EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA because we consider them important supplemental measures of our performance and believe they are frequently used by securities analysts, investors and other interested parties in the evaluation of companies issuing debt, many of which present EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA when reporting their results. We present EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA on a consolidated basis. However, we conduct substantially all of our operations through subsidiaries. The operating results of our subsidiaries may not be sufficient to make distributions to us. In addition, our subsidiaries are not obligated to make funds available to us for payment of our senior notes or otherwise, and distributions and intercompany transfers from our subsidiaries to us may be restricted by applicable law or covenants contained in debt agreements and other agreements to which these subsidiaries currently may be subject or into which they may enter into in the future. The terms of any borrowings of our subsidiaries or other entities in which we own equity may restrict dividends, distributions or loans to us.
EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA have limitations as analytical tools, and you should not consider them in isolation, or as substitutes for analysis of our results as reported under generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP. For example, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA:
·
do not reflect our cash expenditures, or future requirements for capital expenditures, or contractual commitments;
·
do not reflect changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs; and
·
do not reflect the significant interest expense, or the cash requirements necessary to service interest or principal payments, on our debts.
Although depreciation, depletion and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being depreciated, depleted or amortized often will have to be replaced in the future, and EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA do not reflect any cash requirements for such replacements. Other companies in the industries in which we operate may calculate EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA differently than we do, limiting their usefulness as comparative measures. In addition, EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA do not reflect the impact of earnings or charges resulting from matters we consider not to be indicative of our ongoing operations.
EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA are not measurements of our financial performance under GAAP and should not be considered as an alternative to net earnings, operating income or any other performance measures derived in accordance with GAAP or as an alternative to cash flow from operating activities as a measure of our liquidity. We compensate for these limitations by relying primarily on our GAAP results and using EBITDA only supplementally.


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The following table reconciles net earnings (loss) to EBITDA and EBITDA to Adjusted EBITDA for the periods indicated (in $000s):
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
2003
 
2002
 
 
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
     
Net earnings (loss)
 
$
798,833
 
$
(25,669
)
$
153,754
 
$
70,332
 
$
48,726
 
Interest expense
   
132,878
   
105,179
   
65,623
   
38,865
   
37,204
 
Income tax expense (benefit)
   
40,149
   
21,092
   
18,312
   
(15,792
)
 
10,880
 
Depreciation, depletion and amortization          
   
166,903
   
153,498
   
103,958
   
78,401
   
52,689
 
EBITDA
   
1,138,763
   
254,100
   
341,647
   
171,806
   
149,499
 
Unrealized (gains) losses on derivative contracts
   
(99,707
)
 
69,254
   
9,179
   
2,614
   
3,608
 
Adjusted EBITDA
 
$
1,039,056
 
$
323,354
 
$
350,826
 
$
174,420
 
$
153,107
 
——————
(2)
Represents our ratio of earnings to fixed charges for the periods indicated. For purposes of computing the ratio of earnings to fixed charges, earnings represent earnings from continuing operations before income taxes, equity in earnings (loss) of investees and minority interest plus fixed charges. Fixed charges include (a) interest on indebtedness (whether expensed or capitalized), (b) amortization premiums, discounts and capitalized expenses related to indebtedness and (c) the portion of rent expense we believe to be representative of interest. For 2006 and 2005, fixed charges exceeded earnings by $44.4 million and $15.9 million, respectively.
(3)
On July 1, 2003, we adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 150 (SFAS 150), Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Characteristics of both Liabilities and Equity. SFAS 150 requires that a financial instrument, which is an unconditional obligation, be classified as a liability. Previous guidance required an entity to include in equity financial instruments that the entity could redeem in either cash or stock. Pursuant, to SFAS 150, our preferred units, which are an unconditional obligation, have been reclassified from “Partners equity” to a liability account in the consolidated balance sheets.
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is comprised of the following sections:
1.
Overview
2.
Discontinued Operations
3.
Results of Operations
·
Consolidated Financial Results
·
Gaming
·
Real Estate
·
Home Fashion
·
Holding Company and Investments
4.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
·
Consolidated Financial Results
·
Gaming
·
Real Estate
·
Home Fashion
5.
Critical Accounting Policies & Estimates
6.
Certain Trends and Uncertainties


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Overview
American Real Estate Partners, L.P., the “Company” or AREP or “we”, is a master limited partnership formed in Delaware on February 17, 1987. AREP is a diversified holding company owning subsidiaries engaged in the following operating businesses: Gaming, Real Estate, and Home Fashion. In addition, during the fourth quarter of 2006 we divested our Oil and Gas operating unit and our Atlantic City Gaming property.
Our primary business strategy is to continually evaluate our existing operating businesses with a view to maximizing value to our unitholders. We may also seek to acquire additional businesses that are distressed or in out-of-favor industries and will consider the divestiture of businesses. In addition, we invest our available liquidity in debt and equity securities with a view to enhancing returns as we continue to assess further acquisitions of operating businesses.
We own a 99% limited partnership interest in American Real Estate Holdings Limited Partnership, or AREH. AREH and its subsidiaries hold our investments and substantially all of our operations are conducted through AREH and its subsidiaries. American Property Investors, Inc., or API, owns a 1% general partnership interest in both us and AREH, representing an aggregate 1.99% general partnership interest in us and AREH. API is owned and controlled by Mr. Carl C. Icahn. As of December 31, 2006, affiliates of Mr. Icahn beneficially owned approximately 90% of our outstanding depositary units and approximately 86.5% of our outstanding preferred units.
In addition to our Gaming, Real Estate and Home Fashion operating units, we discuss the Holding Company. The Holding Company includes the unconsolidated results of AREH and AREP, and investment activity and expenses associated with the activities of a holding company.
A summary of the significant events that occurred in 2006 is as follows:
·
Sold our Oil and Gas operating unit and our Atlantic City gaming properties in November 2006, resulting in a gain of approximately $663.7 million;
·
Enhanced our liquidity: our total cash and investments as of December 31, 2006 increased to approximately $2.6 billion, as compared to $1.3 billion as of December 31, 2005, resulting primarily from the proceeds from the sale of our Oil and Gas and Atlantic City gaming properties;
·
Entered into a credit agreement providing for additional borrowings by AREP of up to $150.0 million. As of December 31, 2006 there were no borrowings under the facility;
·
Acquired the Aquarius Casino Resort in Laughlin, Nevada in May 2006; and
·
Increased our investment in WPI through the purchase of $200.0 million of preferred stock, the proceeds of which, in part, WPI used to acquire a manufacturing facility in Bahrain.
The key factors affecting the financial results for the year ended December 31, 2006 versus 2005 were:
·
Reclassified the operating results of our Oil and Gas operating unit and Atlantic City gaming properties to discontinued operations as a result of the sale of those businesses in the fourth quarter of 2006. These sales resulted in a gain of $663.7 million. Gains on sales of assets from the sales and disposition of real estate were $12.7 million and $21.8 million for 2006 and 2005, respectively;
·
An increase in operating income of $10.2 million from real estate property development, attributable primarily to $36.1 million of sales at our New Seabury, Massachusetts property;
·
Operating losses of $150.6 million from our Home Fashion segment, of which $45.6 million relates to restructuring costs consisting primarily of impairment charges in connection with the closing of plants, the effect of which on net earnings was offset in part by $68.2 million relating to the minority interests’ share in WPI’s losses;
·
An increase in Holding Company costs of $8.7 million, principally due to a $6.2 million non-cash compensation charge related to the cancellation of unit options, as well as higher legal and professional fees;
·
Net realized and unrealized gains on investments of $91.3 million in 2006 compared to net realized and unrealized losses on investments of $21.3 million in 2005;


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·
Recorded $34.5 million of income tax benefits in 2006 as a result of the reversal of deferred tax valuation allowances for our Oil and Gas operating unit and Atlantic City gaming properties; and
·
Income from discontinued operations increased to $154.8 million in 2006 as compared to losses from discontinued operations in 2005 of $28.5 million, primarily as a result of an increase in oil and gas operating income of $145.8 million (realized and unrealized oil and gas derivative gains in 2006 were $73.8 million compared to realized and unrealized oil and gas derivative losses of $120.5 million in 2005). 2005 results were negatively impacted by the impairment charge of $52.4 million in 2005 relating to GB Holdings’ bankruptcy.
The key factors affecting the financial results for the year ended December 31, 2005 versus 2004 were:
·
Decreased operating income, principally due to the operating loss of $22.4 million in the Home Fashion segment and an increase of $12.4 million in Holding Company costs;
·
Net losses on securities of $21.3 million in 2005 versus gains of $16.5 million in 2004;
·
Interest expense increased $43.9 million due to higher debt levels; and
·
Income (loss) from discontinued operations fell $91.6 million resulting from reduced gains on sales of properties and impairment charges of $52.4 million in connection with the bankruptcy of GBH.
Discontinued Operations
The Sands and Related Assets
On November 17, 2006, our indirect majority-owned subsidiary, Atlantic Coast Entertainment Holdings, Inc., ACE Gaming LLC, a New Jersey limited liability company and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Atlantic Coast which owns The Sands Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, AREH, and certain other entities owned by or affiliated with AREH completed the sale to Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc., of the outstanding membership interests in ACE and 100% of the equity interests in certain subsidiaries of AREH which own parcels of real estate adjacent to The Sands, including 7.7 acres of land known as the Traymore site. We own, through subsidiaries, approximately 67.6% of Atlantic Coast, which owns 100% of ACE. The aggregate price was approximately $274.8 million, of which approximately $200.6 million was paid to Atlantic Coast and approximately $74.2 million was paid to affiliates of AREH for subsidiaries which own the Traymore site and the adjacent properties. Under the terms of the agreement, $50.0 million of the purchase price paid to Atlantic Coast was deposited into escrow pending satisfaction of certain conditions, including the conclusion of the GBH litigation. On February 22, 2007, we resolved all outstanding litigation involving our interest in the Atlantic City gaming operations, resulting in a release of all claims against us. See Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Oil and Gas Operations
On November 21, 2006, our indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, AREP O & G Holdings LLC, completed the sale of all of the issued and outstanding membership interests of NEG Oil & Gas LLC to SandRidge for consideration consisting of $1.025 billion in cash, 12,842,000 shares of SandRidge’s common stock, valued at $18 per share on the date of closing, and the repayment by SandRidge of $300.0 million of debt of NEG Oil & Gas.
On November 21, 2006, pursuant to an agreement dated October 25, 2006 among AREH, NEG Oil & Gas and NEGI, NEGI sold its membership interest in NEG Holding LLC to NEG Oil & Gas in consideration of approximately $261.1 million paid in cash. Of that amount, $149.6 million was used to repay the NEGI 10.75% senior notes due 2007, including principal and accrued interest, all of which was held by us.
Real Estate
Certain of our real estate properties are classified as discontinued operations. The properties classified as discontinued operations changed during 2006 and, accordingly, certain amounts in the accompanying 2005 and 2004 financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current classification of properties.


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Results of Discontinued Operations
The financial position and results of these operations are presented as assets and liabilities of discontinued operations held for sale in the consolidated balance sheets and discontinued operations in the consolidated statements of operations, respectively, for all periods presented in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 144 (SFAS No. 144), “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets.” For further discussion, see Note 5 to our consolidated financial statements.
Summarized financial information for discontinued operations is set forth below:
   
December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
                                                                                                                                                    
     
   
     
   
     
     
Total revenues
 
$
497,060
 
$
368,133
 
$
329,600
 
Total operating income
   
174,334
   
34,852
   
46,720
 
Interest expense
   
(26,266
)
 
(14,005
)
 
(18,303
)
Interest and other income
   
11,004
   
5,897
   
6,703
 
Impairment loss on GBH
   
   
(52,366
)
 
(15,600
)
Income tax expense
   
(4,241
)
 
(2,922
)
 
(8,213
)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
   
154,831
   
(28,544
)
 
11,307
 
Gain on sales of discontinued operations, net of income taxes
   
676,444
   
21,849
   
75,197
 
Minority interests
   
(55,511
)
 
3,682
   
2,074
 
   
$
775,764
 
$
(3,013
)
$
88,578
 
Results of Operations
Consolidated Financial Results
Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2005
Revenues for 2006 increased by $577.0 million, or 64.0%, as compared to 2005. This increase reflects the inclusion of WPI, which we acquired in August 2005, for the entire year in 2006 (an increase of $485.0 million); increases in revenue of $57.7 million from Gaming and of $34.3 million from Real Estate. Gaming revenues include $57.6 million of revenues generated by the Aquarius Casino Resort in Laughlin, Nevada, which was acquired in May 2006.
We reported an operating loss for 2006 of $89.8 million as compared to operating income of $45.2 million for 2005. This change is primarily attributable to the inclusion of $150.6 million of operating losses for WPI, of which $45.6 million relates to impairment and restructuring charges, reduction in operating income of $8.3 million for Gaming, and an increase in Holding Company costs of $8.7 million. The effect of operating losses from WPI on our net earnings are offset, in part, by $68.2 million attributable to the WPI minority interests’ share of such losses. Operating income for 2006 from Real Estate increased by $10.2 million, primarily attributable to the sale of 37 units at New Seabury.
Interest expense for 2006 increased by $15.4 million, or 16.9%, as compared to 2005. This increase includes a full year in 2006 of interest on the $480.0 million principal amount of senior notes issued on February 7, 2005, an increase in borrowings under credit facilities, as well as margin interest expense incurred in the Holding Company’s investment brokerage accounts. Interest income increased by $9.9 million, or 23.1%, as compared to the prior year, due to the increase in the Holding Company’s cash position. Other income (expense), net increased by $112.1 million from the prior period, primarily reflecting net realized and unrealized gains on investments.
Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2004
Revenues for 2005 increased by $539.4 million, or 149.2%, as compared to the prior year. This increase reflects the inclusion of WPI ($472.7 million for five months), increases of $28.0 million for Gaming and $38.7 million for Real Estate.
Operating income for 2005 decreased by $10.8 million, or 19.2%, as compared to the prior year. This decrease reflects the inclusion of losses on WPI of $22.4 million and an increase in Holding Company costs of $12.4 million,


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of which $4.3 million related to acquisitions. These items were offset by increases of $18.2 million from Gaming, and $5.9 million from Real Estate activities.
Interest expense for 2005 increased by $43.9 million, or 92.7%, as compared to the prior year. This increase reflects the increased amount of borrowings, principally attributable to the issuance in February 2005 of $480.0 million principal amount of 7.125% senior notes due 2013. Interest income increased slightly by $0.6 million, or 1.5%, as compared to the prior year. Other income (expense), net decreased by $37.3 million resulting primarily from net realized and unrealized gains and losses on investments.
Gaming
Our Gaming segment consists of our four gaming properties in Nevada: the Stratosphere, Arizona Charlie’s Boulder, and Arizona Charlie’s Dacatur in Las Vegas, and the Aquarius in Laughlin. As described above, operating results for The Sands are now classified as discontinued operations and are excluded from the results of our continuing Gaming operations. As disclosed in Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements, we acquired the Aquarius on May 19, 2006. Net revenues and operating loss for the Aquarius from the date of acquisition, May 19, 2006, through December 31, 2006 were $57.6 million and $0.4 million, respectively.
The Aquarius’ results are included in the table below in the column “Including Aquarius”. The results of operations discussed below refer to our gaming properties excluding the results of the Aquarius.
Summarized income statement information for the years ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004 is as follows (in $000s):
   
December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
                                                                                                                     
     
 
Including
Aquarius
     
 
Excluding
Aquarius
     
   
     
   
 
Revenues:
                         
Casino
 
$
220,814
 
$
179,643
 
$
182,938
 
$
167,972
 
Hotel
   
75,587
   
65,359
   
61,862
   
54,653
 
Food and beverage
   
83,667
   
72,346
   
70,060
   
66,953
 
Tower, retail and other income
   
35,912
   
33,668
   
35,413
   
33,778
 
Gross revenues
   
415,980
   
351,016
   
350,273
   
323,356
 
Less promotional allowances
   
30,281
   
22,911
   
22,291
   
23,375
 
Net revenues
   
385,699
   
328,105
   
327,982
   
299,981
 
Expenses:
                         
Casino
   
80,060
   
65,115
   
63,216
   
61,985
 
Hotel
   
33,419
   
27,840
   
26,957
   
24,272
 
Food and beverage
   
60,052
   
52,312
   
51,784
   
48,495
 
Other operating expenses
   
16,856
   
15,416
   
15,372
   
14,035
 
Selling, general and administrative
   
108,977
   
84,764
   
81,321
   
78,816
 
Depreciation and amortization
   
27,620
   
23,550
   
22,305
   
23,516
 
     
326,984
   
268,997
   
260,955
   
251,119
 
Operating income
 
$
58,715
 
$
59,108
 
$
67,027
 
$
48,862
 
As disclosed in Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements, we acquired the Aquarius on May 19, 2006. The following discussion of the results of operations at our gaming properties excludes the results of Aquarius.
We use certain key measurements to evaluate operating revenue. Casino revenue measurements include table games drop and slot coin-in which are the total amounts wagered by patrons. Participation expense includes fees paid to game owners for use of their games. Hotel revenue measurements include hotel occupancy rate, which is the average percentage of available hotel rooms occupied during a period, and average daily room rate, which is the average price of occupied rooms per day. Food and beverage revenue measurements include number of covers, which is the number of guest checks, and the average check amount.


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Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2005
Gross revenues increased 0.2% to $351.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2006 from $350.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2005. This increase was primarily due to an increase in hotel and food and beverage revenues, partially offset by a decrease in casino revenues as discussed below.
Casino Revenues
Casino revenues consist of revenues from slot machines, table games, poker, race and sports book, bingo and keno. Casino revenues decreased 1.8% to $179.6 million, or 51.2% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006 from $182.9 million, or 52.2% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005. This decrease was primarily due to a decline in slot revenue due to less coin in, caused by increases in the price of gas, which adversely affected automobile traffic to Las Vegas, construction disruption at the Stratosphere and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder, and the entry of a new competitor in the market served by Arizona Charlie’s Decatur. For the year ended December 31, 2006, slot machine revenues were $145.6 million, or 81.1% of casino revenues, and table game revenues were $25.6 million, or 14.3% of casino revenues, compared to $149.2 million and $25.2 million, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2005. Other casino revenues, consisting of race and sports book, poker, bingo and keno, were $8.4 million and $8.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2006 and 2005, respectively.
Non-Casino Revenues
Hotel revenues increased 5.7% to $65.4 million, or 18.6% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006 from $61.9 million, or 17.7% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005. This increase was primarily due to a 3.1% increase in hotel occupancy rate and a 2.5% increase in average room rate.
Food and beverage revenues increased 3.3% to $72.3 million, or 20.6% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006, from $70.1 million, or 20.0% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005. This increase was due to an increase in the average check amount partially offset by a decrease in the number of covers.
Tower, retail and other revenues decreased 4.9% to $33.7 million, or 9.6% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006 from $35.4 million, or 10.1% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005. This decrease was primarily due to a reduction in tower revenues because of the removal of the roller coaster.
Promotional Allowances
Promotional allowances are comprised of the retail value of goods and services provided to casino patrons under various marketing programs. As a percentage of casino revenues, promotional allowances increased to 12.8% for the year ended December 31, 2006 from 12.2% for the year ended December 31, 2005. This increase was primarily due to increased marketing promotions, especially at Arizona Charlie’s Decatur and Arizona Charlie’s Boulder.
Operating Expenses
Casino operating expenses increased 3.0% to $65.1 million, or 36.3% of casino revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006, from $63.2 million, or 34.6% of casino revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005. This increase was primarily due to higher participation expenses and labor costs.
Hotel operating expenses increased 3.3% to $27.8 million, or 42.6% of hotel revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006, from $27.0 million, or 43.6% of hotel revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005. This increase was primarily due to higher labor costs as a result of the increase in occupancy rate.
Food and beverage operating expenses increased 1.0% to $52.3 million, or 72.3% of food and beverage revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006, from $51.8 million, or 73.9% of food and beverage revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005. This increase was primarily due to an increase in labor costs.
Other operating expenses remained flat at $15.4 million, or 45.8% of tower, retail and other revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006, from 43.4% of tower, retail and other revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005.


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Selling, general and administrative expenses primarily consisted of payroll, marketing, advertising, utilities and other administrative expenses. These expenses increased 4.2% to $84.8 million, or 24.2% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2006, from $81.3 million, or 23.2% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005. This increase was primarily due to an increase in marketing expenses.
Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2004
Gross revenues increased 8.3% to $350.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $323.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase was largely due to an increase in casino revenues, as well as increases in hotel, food and beverage, tower, retail and other revenues. The increases were primarily attributable to an increase in business volume, as discussed below.
Casino Revenues
Casino revenues consist of revenues from slot machines, table games, poker, race and sports book, bingo and keno. Casino revenues increased 8.9% to $182.9 million, or 52.2% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $168.0 million, or 51.9% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2004. Slot machine revenues were $149.2 million, or 81.6% of casino revenues, and table game revenues were $25.2 million, or 13.8% of casino revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005 compared to $137.1 million, or 81.6% of casino revenues, and $25.1 million, or 14.9% of casino revenues, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2004. The increase in casino revenues was primarily due to an increase in our slot hold percentage. Other casino revenues increased $2.7 million, or 46.6%, from $5.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004 to $8.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2005.
Non-Casino Revenues
Hotel revenues increased 13.2% to $61.9 million, or 17.7% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $54.7 million, or 16.9% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase was primarily due to a 12.8% increase in the average daily room rate at the Stratosphere and a 1.9% increase in overall hotel occupancy. The increase in the average daily room rate was primarily attributable to an increase in direct bookings and a decrease in rooms sold through wholesalers.
Food and beverage revenues increased 4.6% to $70.1 million, or 20.0% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005, from $67.0 million, or 20.7% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase was primarily due to an increase in food and beverage covers of 3.7%.
Tower, retail and other revenues increased 4.7% to $35.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $33.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase was primarily due to an increase in Stratosphere’s tower revenues as a result of more visitors and an increase in the average ticket price due to the opening of the Insanity ride in March 2005.
Promotional Allowances
Promotional allowances are comprised of the retail value of goods and services provided to casino patrons under various marketing programs. As a percentage of casino revenues, promotional allowances decreased to 12.2% for the year ended December 31, 2005 from 13.9% for the year ended December 31, 2004. This decrease was primarily due to less aggressive promotional activities related to our slot operations.
Operating Expenses
Casino operating expenses increased 1.9% to $63.2 million, or 34.6% of casino revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $62.0 million, or 36.9% of casino revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2004. The increase was primarily due to costs related to increased utilization of participation games.
Hotel operating expenses increased 11.1% to $27.0 million, or 43.6% of hotel revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $24.3 million, or 44.4% of hotel revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase was primarily due to an increase in labor costs and supplies associated with the increase in hotel occupancy.


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The decrease in operating expense as a percentage of hotel revenues was attributable to an increase in the average daily room rate.
Food and beverage operating expenses increased 6.8% to $51.8 million, or 73.9% of food and beverage revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $48.5 million, or 72.4% of food and beverage revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase was primarily due to an increase in labor costs and costs associated with an increase in the number of covers.
Other operating expenses increased 9.5% to $15.4 million, or 43.5% of tower, retail and other revenues for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $14.0 million, or 41.4% of tower, retail and other revenues for the years ended December 31, 2004. This increase was primarily due to an increase in labor costs associated with the opening of the Insanity ride and the opening of a new gift shop.
Selling, general and administrative expenses were primarily comprised of payroll, marketing, advertising, repair and maintenance, utilities and other administrative expenses. These expenses increased 3.2% to $81.3 million, or 23.2% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2005 from $78.8 million, or 24.3% of gross revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2004. This increase was primarily due to an increase in payroll expenses, credit card fees and information technology maintenance contracts.
Real Estate
Our real estate operations consist of rental real estate, property development and associated resort activities. The operating performance of the three segments was as follows (in $000s):
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
     
2006
     
2005
     
2004
 
Revenues:
                   
Rental real estate:
                   
Interest income on financing leases                                                            
 
$
6,736
 
$
7,299
 
$
9,880
 
Rental income
   
8,177
   
7,083
   
6,686
 
Property development
   
90,955
   
58,270
   
27,073
 
Resort operations
   
28,707
   
27,647
   
17,918
 
Total revenues
   
134,575
   
100,299
   
61,557
 
Operating expenses:
                   
Rental real estate
   
5,015
   
4,588
   
8,171
 
Property development
   
73,041
   
48,679
   
22,949
 
Resort operations
   
28,565
   
29,245
   
18,561
 
Total expenses
   
106,621
   
82,512
   
49,681
 
Operating income
 
$
27,954
 
$
17,787
 
$
11,876
 
Rental Real Estate
Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2005
Revenues increased to $14.9 million, or by 3.7%, in 2006 from $14.4 million in the prior year. The increase was primarily attributable to leasing of previously vacant space partially offset by increased financing lease amortization and the sale of a financing lease property in 2005.
Operating expenses increased to $5.0 million, or by 9.3%, in 2006 from $4.6 million in the prior year. The increase was primarily due to increased property write-downs and increased rental and administrative expenses of the real estate division.
Year Ended December 31, 2005 compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2004
Revenues decreased to $14.4 million, or by 13.2%, in 2005 from $16.6 million in the prior year. The decrease was primarily attributable to the sale of ten financing lease properties.
Operating expenses decreased to $4.6 million, or by 43.9%, in 2005 from $8.2 million in the prior year. The decrease was primarily due to hurricane related losses in 2004.


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We market portions of our commercial real estate portfolio for sale. Sale activity was as follows (in $000s, except unit data):
   
Year Ended December 31,
   
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
     
   
     
   
     
   
Properties sold
   
18
   
14
   
57
Proceeds received
 
$
25,340
 
$
52,525
 
$
245,424
Mortgage debt repaid
 
$
 
$
10,702
 
$
93,845
Total gain recorded
 
$
12,776
 
$
16,315
 
$
80,459
Gain recorded in continuing operations
 
$
 
$
176
 
$
5,262
Gain recorded in discontinued operations(1)                                            
 
$
12,776
 
$
16,139
 
$
75,197
——————
(1)
In addition to gains on the rental portfolio of $16.1 million, a gain of $5.7 million on the sale of a resort property was recognized in 2005.
Property Development
Property development sales activity was as follows (in $000s, except unit data):
   
Year Ended December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
                                                                                                                                               
                   
Units sold
     
   
     
   
     
   
 
New Seabury, Massachusetts
     
 
37
     
 
1
     
 
7
 
Grand Harbor/Oak Harbor, Florida
   
22
   
21
   
3
 
Falling Waters, Florida
   
57
   
66
   
16
 
Westchester, New York
   
12
   
16
   
12
 
     
128
   
104
   
38
 
Revenues
                   
New Seabury, Massachusetts
 
$
36,081
 
$
423
 
$
2,308
 
Grand Harbor/Oak Harbor, Florida
   
16,410
   
16,279
   
1,882
 
Falling Waters, Florida
   
14,355
   
12,771
   
2,844
 
Westchester, New York
   
24,109
   
28,797
   
20,039
 
   
$
90,955
 
$
58,270
 
$
27,073
 
Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2005
Revenues increased to $91.0 million, or by 56.1%, in 2006 from $58.3 million in the prior year. This increase was due to an increase in the number and the prices of units sold.
Operating expenses increased to $73.0 million, or by 50.0%, in 2006 from $48.7 million in the prior year. Operating expenses increased due to an increase in the number and costs of units sold.
In 2006, we sold 128 units at an average price of $710,586 with a profit margin of 19.7%. In 2005, we sold 104 units at an average price of $560,288 with a profit margin 16.5%.
The primary driver of our increased revenues and operating income was the approval of our New Seabury property for residential development. However, due to the current residential/vacation home sales slowdown, property development sales and profits are expected to decline in 2007 from levels achieved in 2006.
Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2004
Revenues increased to $58.3 million, or by 115.2%, in 2005 from $27.1 million in the prior year. This increase was due to an increase in the number of units sold partially offset by a decrease in the prices of units sold.
Operating expenses increased to $48.7 million, or by 112.1%, in 2005 from $22.9 million in the prior year. Operating expenses increased due to an increase in the number of units sold partially offset by a decrease in the cost of units sold.


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In 2005, we sold 104 units at an average price of $560,288 with a profit margin of 16.5%. In 2004, we sold 38 units at an average price of $712,447 with a profit margin of 15.2%.
Resort Activities
Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2005
Revenues increased to $28.7 million, or by 3.8%, in 2006 from $27.6 million in the prior year primarily attributable to increased club dues.
Operating expenses decreased to $28.6 million, or by 2.3%, in 2006 from $29.2 million in the prior year primarily due to decreased payroll and related expenses.
Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2004
Revenues increased to $27.6 million, or by 54.3%, in 2005 from $17.9 million in the prior year. This increase is primarily due to the acquisition of Grand Harbor in July, 2004. Grand Harbor revenues were $14.3 million and $5.6 million in 2005 and 2004, respectively.
Operating expenses increased to $29.2 million, or by 57.6%, in 2005 from $18.6 million in the prior year. This increase is primarily due to the acquisition of Grand Harbor. Grand Harbor expenses were $16.3 million and $6.4 million in 2005 and 2004, respectively.
Home Fashion
On August 8, 2005, WestPoint International, Inc., or WPI, our indirect subsidiary, completed the acquisition of substantially all of the assets of WestPoint Stevens. The acquisition was completed pursuant to an agreement dated June 23, 2005, which was subsequently approved by the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.
WPI, through its indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, WestPoint Home, Inc., is engaged in the business of manufacturing, sourcing, marketing and distributing bed and bath home fashion products, including among others, sheets, pillowcases, comforters, blankets, bedspreads, pillows, mattress pads, towels and related products. WPI recognizes revenue primarily through the sale of home fashion products to a variety of retail and institutional customers. WPI currently operates 32 retail outlet stores that sell home fashion products consisting principally of products manufactured by WPI. In addition, WPI receives a small portion of its revenues through the licensing of its trademarks.
Ongoing litigation may result in our ownership of WPI being reduced to less than 50%. See Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Results of Operations
Summarized statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2006 and the period from August 8, 2005 (acquisition date) to December 31, 2005 is as follows (in $000s):
   
Year Ended
December 31,
2006
 
Period
August  8,
2005 to
December 31,
2005
 
                                                                                                                          
     
   
     
     
Revenues
 
$
957,656
 
$
472,681
 
Costs and expenses:
             
Cost of sales
   
901,735
   
421,408
 
Selling, general and administrative
   
160,911
   
72,044
 
Restructuring and impairment charges
   
45,647
   
1,658
 
Total costs and expenses
   
1,108,293
   
495,110
 
Operating loss
 
$
(150,637
)
$
(22,429
)
Historically, WPI has been adversely affected by a variety of negative conditions, including the following items that continue to have an impact on its operating results:
·
adverse competitive conditions for U.S. mills compared to mills located overseas;


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·
growth of low priced imports from Asia and Latin America resulting from lifting of import quotas;
·
retailers of consumer goods have become fewer and more powerful over time; and
·
long term increases in pricing and decreases in availability of raw materials.
Year ended December 31, 2006 and for Period from August 8, 2005 to December 31, 2005
Net sales for the year ended December 31, 2006 were $957.7 million. Bed products net sales were $572.6 million, bath products net sales were $311.8 million and other net sales were $73.3 million (consisting primarily of sales from the Company’s retail outlet stores). Net sales for the period August 8, 2005 (acquisition date) to December 31, 2005 were $472.7 million. Bed products net sales were $294.9 million, bath products net sales were $144.0 million and other net sales were $33.8 million (consisting primarily of sales from the Company’s retail outlet stores).
Total depreciation expense for 2006 was $31.6 million, of which $25.5 million was included in cost of sales and $6.1 million was included in selling, general and administrative expenses. Total depreciation expense for the period from August 8, 2005 (acquisition date) to December 31, 2005 was $19.4 million, of which $16.0 million was included in cost of sales and $3.4 million was included in selling, general and administrative expenses.
Gross earnings before selling, general and administrative expenses for 2006 were $55.9 million, and reflect gross margins of 5.8%. Gross earnings during 2006 were negatively impacted by the carrying costs of certain U.S. based manufacturing facilities that were closed in 2006 or are scheduled to be closed during 2007. Gross earnings before selling, general and administrative expenses for the period August 8, 2005 (acquisition date) to December 31, 2005 were $51.3 million, and reflect gross margins of 10.8%.
Selling, general and administrative expenses were $160.9 million for 2006, and as a percent of net sales represented 16.8%. Selling, general and administrative expenses were $72.0 million for the period from August 8, 2005 (acquisition date) to December 31, 2005, and as a percent of net sales represent 15.2%.
Total expenses for 2006 included $33.3 million of non-cash impairment charges related to the fixed assets of plants that have been or will be closed and $12.3 million of restructuring charges (of which $3.4 million related to severance costs and $8.9 million related to continuing costs of closed plants). Total expenses for the period from August 8, 2005 (acquisition date) to December 31, 2005 included $1.7 million of restructuring charges (of which $0.1 million related to severance costs and $1.6 million related to continuing costs relating to closed plants).
We expect to continue our restructuring efforts and, accordingly, expect that restructuring charges and operating losses will continue to be incurred throughout 2007. If our restructuring efforts are unsuccessful, we may be required to record additional impairment charges related to the carrying value of long-lived assets. Additionally, as part of the restructuring efforts, we expect to record impairment charges as additional plants are closed.
Holding Company
Investment Activities
The Holding Company engages in various investment activities. The activities include those associated with investing its available liquidity, investing to earn returns from increases or decreases in the market price of securities, and investing with the prospect of acquiring operating businesses that we control.
Holding Company and Acquisition Costs
Holding Company and acquisition costs are treated as general and administrative expenses, which are primarily related to payroll expense and professional fees of the Holding Company.
Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2005
Holding Company and acquisition costs increased 50.6% to $25.8 million, as compared to $17.1 million in the prior year due largely to the impact of a compensation charge related to the cancellation of unit options of $6.2 million and higher legal and other professional fees of $3.2 million and $2.8 million, respectively.


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Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2004
Holding company and acquisition costs increased 262% to $17.1 million, as compared to $4.7 million in the prior year due largely to higher direct acquisition costs of $4.3 million and other legal and professional fees of $3.3 million.
The direct acquisition costs related to legal and professional fees associated with the five acquisitions that were made in the first two quarters of 2005. Direct acquisition costs associated with the WPI acquisition have been capitalized. Legal and professional expenses rose due to ongoing legal proceedings relating to WPI, as well as increased expense associated with the preparation and review of our financial results and other compliance related activities including those required under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Higher compensation costs reflect increased headcount levels (average of 22 employees in 2005 compared to 15 in the prior year) as well as costs associated with the CEO option plan.
Interest Income and Expense
Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2005
Interest expense increased 16.9% to $106.6 million, during 2006 as compared to $91.2 million in the prior year. This increase reflects increased borrowings in 2006 as a result of margin expense of $7.9 million, borrowing under the ACEP revolving credit facility, which was increased to $60.0 million in May 2006 and a $32.5 million mortgage in June 2006.
Interest income increased 23.1% to $52.7 million during 2006 as compared to $42.8 million in 2005. This was primarily due to the substantial increase in the Holding Company’s cash position from the sales of our Oil and Gas operations and ACE in the fourth quarter of 2006.
Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to the Year Ended December 31, 2004
Interest expense increased 92.7% to $91.2 million, during 2005 as compared to $47.3 million in the prior year. This increase reflects increased borrowings in 2005 as a result of the $480.0 million senior notes in February 2005 and a full year’s interest on the $353.0 million senior notes issued in May 2004.
Interest income for 2005 and 2004 was $42.8 million and $42.1 million, respectively.
Other Income (Expense), net
Other income (expense), net for the years ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004 is as follows (in $000s):
   
Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
 
     
   
     
   
     
     
Net realized gains on sales of marketable securities                              
 
$
69,099
     
$
10,120
 
$
40,159
 
Unrealized gains (losses) on marketable securities
   
21,288
   
9,856
   
(4,812
)
Net realized (losses) on securities sold short
   
(17,146
)
 
(37,058
)
 
 
Unrealized gains (losses) on securities sold short
   
18,067
   
(4,178
)
 
(18,807
)
Gain on sale or disposition of real estate
   
3,372
   
176
   
5,262
 
Other
   
4,597
   
8,223
   
2,651
 
   
$
99,277
 
$
(12,861
)
$
24,453
 
Equity in Earnings of Affiliate (ImClone Systems Incorporated)
In the fourth quarter of 2006, we changed our method of accounting for our investment in ImClone Systems Incorporated to the equity method of accounting. As a result, the financial statements of prior years have been adjusted to apply the new method retrospectively. See Notes 2 and 7 to the consolidated financial statements.
The effect of the change increased our 2006 net income by $12.6 million ($0.23 per share). The financial statements for 2005 have been retrospectively adjusted for the change, which resulted in an increase of net income for 2005 of $1.4 million ($0.04 per share). The effect of the change resulted in an increase and decrease in our total


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partners’ equity by $42.2 million and $2.9 million at December 31, 2006 and 2005, respectively, as a result of recording our proportionate share of ImClone’s net income, other comprehensive income and other changes in ImClone’s stockholders’ equity.
At December 31, 2006 and 2005, our carrying value of our equity investment in ImClone was $164.3 million and $97.3 million, respectively. As of December 31, 2006, the market value of our ImClone shares held was $122.2 million. As of September 30, 2006, our underlying equity in the net assets of ImClone was approximately $36.3 million. While we recognize that the carrying value of our investment in ImClone as of December 31, 2006 is greater than the market value of our shares held, we do not believe that this is an other than temporary decline and accordingly no impairment has been recognized. We evaluate the carrying value of our investment in Imclone on a quarterly basis.
Effective Income Tax Rate
For the year ended December 31, 2006, we recorded an income tax provision of $13.3 million on a pre-tax loss of $31.8 million. For the year ended December 31, 2005, we recorded an income tax provision of $18.2 million on a pre-tax loss of $14.6 million. Our effective income tax rate was (41.7%) and (124.2%) for the respective periods. The difference between the effective tax rate and statutory federal rate of 35% is principally due to losses incurred for which a benefit was not provided, changes in the valuation allowance and partnership income not subject to taxation, as such taxes are the responsibility of the partners.
For the year ended December 31, 2005, we recorded an income tax provision of $18.2 million on a pre-tax loss of $14.6 million. For the year ended December 31, 2004, we recorded an income tax provision of $10.1 million on pre-tax income of $75.3 million. Our effective income tax rate was (124.2%) and 13.4% for the respective periods. The difference between the effective tax rate and statutory federal rate of 35% is principally due to losses incurred for which a benefit was not provided, changes in the valuation allowance and partnership income not subject to taxation, as such taxes are the responsibility of the partners.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Consolidated Financial Results
We are a holding company. In addition to cash and cash equivalents, U.S. government and agency obligations, marketable equity and debt securities and other short-term investments, our assets consist primarily of investments in our subsidiaries. The sale of our Oil and Gas operating unit and Atlantic City gaming properties resulted in significant increases in our liquid assets. As we continue to make investments in our operating businesses or make investments in new businesses, we expect to reduce the liquid assets at AREP and AREH to fund those businesses and investments. Consequently, our cash flow and our ability to meet our debt service obligations and make distributions with respect to depositary units and preferred units likely will depend on the cash flow of our subsidiaries and the payment of funds to us by our subsidiaries in the form of loans, dividends, distributions or otherwise.
The operating results of our subsidiaries may not be sufficient to make distributions to us. In addition, our subsidiaries are not obligated to make funds available to us, and distributions and intercompany transfers from our subsidiaries to us may be restricted by applicable law or covenants contained in debt agreements and other agreements to which our subsidiaries may be subject or enter into in the future. The terms of any borrowings of our subsidiaries or other entities in which we own equity may restrict dividends, distributions or loans to us. For example, the notes issued by our indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, ACEP, contain restrictions on dividends and distributions and loans to us, as well as on other transactions with us. ACEP and WPI each also have financing agreements that have the effect of restricting dividends, distributions and other transactions with us. These agreements may preclude our receiving payments from these subsidiaries which account for a significant portion of our revenues and cash flows. We may enter into similar agreements for other segments or subsidiaries. To the degree any distributions and transfers are impaired or prohibited, our ability to make payments on our debt will be limited.
In February 2007, we entered into an agreement and plan of merger pursuant to which we would acquire Lear for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $5.2 billion, of which we expect $2.6 billion will be financed with new borrowings, $1.3 billion of existing debt will be assumed by us, and the remaining $1.4 billion of equity will be invested by us.


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On February 8, 2007, our subsidiary, AREP Car Holdings Corp., entered into a commitment letter with Bank of America, N.A., and Banc of America Securities LLC, pursuant to which Bank of America will act as the initial lender under two senior secured credit facilities in an aggregate principal amount of $3.6 billion, consisting of a $1.0 billion senior secured revolving facility and a $2.6 billion senior secured term loan B facility. The credit facilities, along with cash on hand, are intended to refinance and replace Lear’s existing credit facilities and to fund the transactions contemplated by the merger. We intend to fund approximately $1.4 billion of the purchase price from our cash and cash equivalents and investments.
If we complete the acquisition of Lear and fund the acquisition as we currently contemplate, under the financial tests in their indentures, AREP and AREH will not be able to incur additional indebtedness. Our subsidiaries, other than AREH, are not subject to any of the covenants contained in the indentures with respect to our senior notes, including the covenants restricting debt incurred.
In May 2004, we issued $353.0 million principal amount of 8.125% senior notes due 2012. In February 2005, we issued $480.0 million principal amount of 7.125% senior notes due 2013. In August 2006, we entered into a credit agreement pursuant to which we will be permitted to borrow up to $150.0 million. As of December 31, 2006, there were no borrowings under the facility. See “Borrowings” below for additional information concerning credit facilities for our subsidiaries.
On January 16, 2007, we issued an additional $500.0 million aggregate principal amount of 7 1/8 % senior notes due 2013. The notes were issued pursuant to an indenture dated February 7, 2005, between us, as issuer, were issued at a 99.5% of par, or at a discount of 0.5%, and AREP Finance, as co-issuer, AREH, as Guarantor, and Wilmington Trust Company, as trustee. The notes have a fixed annual interest rate of 7 1/8% per annum, which will be paid every six months on February 15 and August 15 commencing on February 15, 2007. The notes will mature on February 15, 2013.
As of December 31, 2006, the Holding Company had a cash and cash equivalents balance of $1.3 billion, short-term investments of $657.8 million (of which $163.7 million was invested in short-term fixed-income securities) and total debt of $831.2 million, which primarily relates to the senior unsecured notes.
We actively pursue various means to raise cash from our subsidiaries. To date, such means include payment of dividends from subsidiaries, obtaining loans or other financings based on the asset values of subsidiaries or selling debt or equity securities of subsidiaries through capital market transactions. As a result of financing transactions at our subsidiaries, we will face significant limitations on the amounts of cash that we can receive from our subsidiaries. Our ability to make future interest payments, therefore, will be based on receiving cash from those subsidiaries that do not have restrictions and from other financing and liquidity sources available to AREP and AREH.
Cash Flows
Net cash provided by continuing operating activities was $117.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2006 as compared to $45.1 million in 2005. The increase primarily relates to net cash provided by activities and reductions in working capital. Our cash and cash equivalents and investments in marketable equity and debt securities increased by $1.4 billion during the year ended December 31, 2006, primarily resulting from the sale of our Oil and Gas operating unit and Atlantic City gaming properties, as well as $117.7 million net cash provided by continuing operations, partially offset by acquisitions of businesses of $208.6 million, and capital expenditures of $61.3 million.
We are continuing to pursue the purchase of business and assets, including businesses and assets that may not generate positive cash flow, are difficult to finance or may require additional capital, such as properties for development, non-performing loans, securities of companies that are undergoing or that may undergo restructuring, and companies that are in need of capital. All of these activities require us to maintain a strong capital base and liquidity.


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Borrowings
Long-term debt consists of the following (in $000s):
   
December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
 
     
   
     
     
Senior unsecured 7.125% notes due 2013 — AREP                                              
 
$
480,000
 
$
480,000
 
Senior unsecured 8.125% notes due 2012 — AREP, net of discount
   
351,246
   
350,922
 
Senior secured 7.85% notes due 2012 — ACEP
   
215,000
   
215,000
 
Borrowings under credit facilities — ACEP
   
40,000
   
 
Borrowings under credit facilities — NEG Oil & Gas(1)
   
   
300,000
 
Mortgages payable
   
109,289
   
81,512
 
Other
   
13,425
   
8,387
 
Total long-term debt
   
1,208,960
   
1,435,821
 
Less: current portion, including debt related to assets held for sale
   
(23,970
)
 
(324,155
)
 
 
$
1,184,990
 
$
1,111,666
 
——————
(1)
On November 21, 2006, we sold all of the issued and outstanding membership interest in NEG Oil & Gas to SandRidge, consideration for which included the assumption by SandRidge of $300.0 million of debt of NEG Oil & Gas.
Senior unsecured notes — AREP
Senior unsecured 7.125% notes due 2013
On February 7, 2005, AREP and American Real Estate Finance Corp., or AREF, closed on their offering of senior notes due 2013. AREF, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, was formed solely for the purpose of serving as a co-issuer of debt securities. AREF does not have any operations or assets and does not have any revenues. The notes, in the aggregate principal amount of $480.0 million, were priced at 100% of principal amount. The notes have a fixed annual interest rate of 7 1/8%, which will be paid every six months on February 15 and August 15. The notes will mature on February 15, 2013. AREH is a guarantor of the debt. No other subsidiaries guarantee payment on the notes.
As described below, the notes restrict the ability of AREP and AREH, subject to certain exceptions, to, among other things: incur additional debt; pay dividends or make distributions; repurchase stock; create liens; and enter into transactions with affiliates.
Senior unsecured 8.125% notes due 2012
On May 12, 2004, AREP and AREF closed on their offering of senior notes due 2012. The notes, in the aggregate principal amount of $353 million, were priced at 99.266% of principal amount. The notes have a fixed annual interest rate of 8 1/8%, which will be paid every six months on June 1 and December 1, commencing December 1, 2004. The notes will mature on June 1, 2012. AREH is a guarantor of the debt. No other subsidiaries guarantee payment on the notes.
As described below, the notes restrict the ability of AREP and AREH, subject to certain exceptions, to, among other things: incur additional debt; pay dividends or make distributions; repurchase stock; create liens; and enter into transactions with affiliates.
Senior unsecured notes restrictions and covenants
Both issuances of our senior unsecured notes restrict the payment of cash dividends or distributions, the purchase of equity interests or the purchase, redemption, defeasance or acquisition of debt subordinated to the senior unsecured notes. The notes also restrict the incurrence of debt or the issuance of disqualified stock, as defined, with certain exceptions, provided that we may incur debt or issue disqualified stock if, immediately after such incurrence or issuance, the ratio of the aggregate principal amount of all outstanding indebtedness of AREP and its subsidiaries on a consolidated basis to the tangible net worth of AREP and its subsidiaries on a consolidated basis would have


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been less than 1.75 to 1.0. As of December 31, 2006, such ratio was less than 1.75 to 1.0. Based on this ratio, we and AREH could have incurred up to approximately $1.6 billion of additional indebtedness. If we complete the acquisition of Lear and fund the acquisition as we currently contemplate, AREP and AREH will not be able to incur additional indebtedness under this test.
In addition, both issuances of notes require that on each quarterly determination date we and the guarantor of the notes (currently only AREH) maintain a minimum ratio of cash flow to fixed charges each as defined, of 1.5 to 1.0, for the four consecutive fiscal quarters most recently completed prior to such quarterly determination date. For the four quarters ended December 31, 2006, the ratio of cash flow to fixed charges was greater than 1.5 to 1.0.
The notes also require, on each quarterly determination date, that the ratio of total unencumbered assets, as defined, to the principal amount of unsecured indebtedness, as defined, be greater than 1.5 to 1.0 as of the last day of the most recently completed fiscal quarter. As of December 31, 2006, such ratio was in excess of 1.5 to 1.0.
The notes also restrict the creation of liens, mergers, consolidations and sales of substantially all of our assets, and transactions with affiliates.
As of December 31, 2006, we were in compliance with each of the covenants contained in our senior unsecured notes. We expect to be in compliance with each of the debt covenants for the period of at least twelve months from December 31, 2006.
AREP Senior Secured Revolving Credit Facility
On August 21, 2006, we and AREP Finance as the Borrowers, and certain of our subsidiaries, as Guarantors, entered into a credit agreement with Bear Stearns Corporate Lending Inc., as Administrative Agent, and certain other lender parties. Under the credit agreement, we will be permitted to borrow up to $150.0 million, including a $50.0 million sub-limit that may be used for letters of credit. Borrowings under the agreement, which are based on our credit rating, bear interest at LIBOR plus 1.0% to 2.0%. We pay an unused line fee of 0.25% to 0.5%. As of December 31, 2006 there were no borrowings under the facility.
Obligations under the credit agreement are guaranteed by and secured by liens on substantially all of the assets of certain of our indirect wholly-owned holding company subsidiaries. The credit agreement has a term of four years and all amounts will be due and payable on August 21, 2010. The credit agreement includes covenants that, among other things, restrict the creation of liens and certain dispositions of property by our wholly-owned holding company subsidiaries that are guarantors. Obligations under the credit agreement are immediately due and payable upon the occurrence of certain events of default.
Senior secured 7.85% notes due 2012 — ACEP
In January 2004, ACEP issued senior secured notes due 2012. The notes, in the aggregate principal amount of $215.0 million, bear interest at the rate of 7.85% per annum, which will be paid every six months, on February 1 and August 1.
ACEP’s 7.85% senior secured notes due 2012 restrict the payment of cash dividends or distributions by ACEP, the purchase of its equity interests, the purchase, redemption, defeasance or acquisition of debt subordinated to ACEP’s notes and investments as “restricted payments.” ACEP’s notes also prohibit the incurrence of debt or the issuance of disqualified or preferred stock, as defined, by ACEP, with certain exceptions, provided that ACEP may incur debt or issue disqualified stock if, immediately after such incurrence or issuance, the ratio of consolidated cash flow to fixed charges (each as defined) for the most recently ended four full fiscal quarters for which internal financial statements are available immediately preceding the date on which such additional indebtedness is incurred or disqualified stock or preferred stock is issued would have been at least 2.0 to 1.0, determined on a pro forma basis giving effect to the debt incurrence or issuance. As of December 31, 2006, such ratio was in excess of 2.0 to 1.0. The ACEP notes also restrict the creation of liens, the sale of assets, mergers, consolidations or sales of substantially all of its assets, the lease or grant of a license, concession, other agreements to occupy, manage or use ACEP’s assets, the issuance of capital stock of restricted subsidiaries and certain related party transactions. The ACEP notes allow it to incur indebtedness, among other things, of up to $50.0 million under credit facilities, non-recourse financing of up to $15.0 million to finance the construction, purchase or lease of personal or real property used in its business, permitted affiliate subordinated indebtedness (as defined), the issuance of additional 7.85% senior secured


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notes due 2012 in an aggregate principal amount not to exceed 2.0 times net cash proceeds received from equity offerings and permitted affiliate subordinated debt, and additional indebtedness of up to $10.0 million.
ACEP Senior Secured Revolving Credit Facility
Effective May 11, 2006, ACEP, and certain of ACEP’s subsidiaries, as Guarantors, entered into an amended and restated credit agreement with Wells Fargo Bank N.A., as syndication agent, Bear Stearns Corporate Lending Inc., as administrative agent, and certain other lender parties. As of December 31, 2006, the interest rate on the outstanding borrowings under the credit facility was 6.85% per annum. The credit agreement amends and restates, and is on substantially the same terms as, a credit agreement entered into as of January 29, 2004. Under the credit agreement, ACEP will be permitted to borrow up to $60.0 million. Obligations under the credit agreement are secured by liens on substantially all of the assets of ACEP and its subsidiaries. The credit agreement has a term of four years and all amounts will be due and payable on May 10, 2010. As of December 31, 2006, there were $40.0 million of borrowings under the credit agreement. The borrowings were incurred to finance a portion of the purchase price of the Aquarius.
The credit agreement includes covenants that, among other things, restrict the incurrence of additional indebtedness by ACEP and its subsidiaries, the issuance of disqualified or preferred stock, as defined, the creation of liens by ACEP or its subsidiaries, the sale of assets, mergers, consolidations or sales of substantially all of ACEP’s assets, the lease or grant of a license or concession, other agreements to occupy, manage or use ACEP’s assets, the issuance of capital stock of restricted subsidiaries and certain related party transactions. The credit agreement also requires that, as of the last date of each fiscal quarter, ACEP’s ratio of consolidated first lien debt to consolidated cash flow not be more than 1.0 to 1.0. As of December 31, 2006, such ratio was less than 1.0 to 1.0. As of December 31, 2006, ACEP was in compliance with each of the covenants.
The restrictions imposed by ACEP’s senior secured notes and the credit facility likely will limit our receiving payments from the operations of our hotel and gaming properties.
Mortgages payable
Mortgages payable, all of which are nonrecourse to us, are summarized below. The mortgages bear interest at rates between 4.97 and 7.99% and have maturities between September 1, 2008 and July 1, 2016. The following is a summary of mortgages payable (in $000s):
 
 
December 31, 
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
 
     
   
     
     
Total mortgages
 
$
109,289
 
$
81,512
 
Less: current portion and mortgages on properties held for sale
   
(18,174
)
 
(18,104
)
 
 
$
91,115
 
$
63,408
 
On June 30, 2006, certain of our indirect subsidiaries engaged in property development and associated resort activities entered into a $32.5 million loan agreement with Textron Financial Corp. The loan is secured by a mortgage on our New Seabury golf course and resort in Mashpee, Massachusetts. The loan bears interest at the rate of 7.96% per annum and matures in five years with a balloon payment due of $30.0 million. Annual debt service payments of $3.0 million are required, which are payable in monthly installment amounts based on a 25-year amortization schedule.
WestPoint Home Secured Revolving Credit Agreement
On June 16, 2006, WestPoint Home, Inc., an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of WPI, entered into a $250.0 million loan and security agreement with Bank of America, N.A., as Administrative Agent and lender. On September 18, 2006, The CIT Group/Commercial Services, Inc., General Electric Capital Corporation and Wells Fargo Foothill, LLC were added as lenders under this credit agreement. Under the five-year agreement, borrowings are subject to a monthly borrowing base calculation and include a $75.0 million sub-limit that may be used for letters of credit. Borrowings under the agreement bear interest, at the election of WestPoint Home, either at the prime rate adjusted by an applicable margin ranging from minus 0.25% to plus 0.50% or LIBOR adjusted by an applicable margin ranging from plus 1.25% to 2.00%. WestPoint Home pays an unused line fee of 0.25% to 0.275%.


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Obligations under the agreement are secured by WestPoint Home’s receivables, inventory and certain machinery and equipment.
The agreement contains covenants including, among others, restrictions on the incurrence of indebtedness, investments, redemption payments, distributions, acquisition of stock, securities or assets of any other entity and capital expenditures. However, WestPoint Home is not precluded from effecting any of these transactions if excess availability, after giving effect to such transaction, meets a minimum threshold.
As of December 31, 2006, there were no borrowings under the agreement, but there were outstanding letters of credit of approximately $40.1 million.
Maturities
The following is a summary of the maturities of our debt obligations (in $000s):
2007 
     
$
23,970
  
2008 
   
29,227
 
2009 
   
6,670
 
2010 
   
1,684
 
2011
   
31,446
 
2012 — 2017
   
1,115,963
 
                                                                                                                                                                 
 
$
1,208,960
 
Contractual Commitments
The following table reflects, at December 31, 2006, our contractual cash obligations, subject to certain conditions, due over the indicated periods and when they come due ($ in millions):
   
Less Than
1 Year
 
1-3
Years
 
3-5
Years
 
After
5 Years
 
Total
 
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
     
   
Senior unsecured 7.125% notes
 
$
 
$
 
$
 
$
480.0
 
$
480.0
Senior unsecured 8.125% notes
   
   
   
   
353.0
   
353.0
Senior secured 7.85% notes
   
   
   
   
215.0
   
215.0
Senior debt interest
   
82.5
   
165.0
   
160.7
   
105.6
   
513.8
Borrowing under credit facilities – ACEP
   
   
   
40.0
   
   
40.0
Mortgages payable
   
18.2
   
30.3
   
32.8
   
28.1
   
109.4
Lease obligations
   
15.8
   
20.5
   
10.4
   
34.5
   
81.2
Construction and development obligations                               
   
9.4
   
0.8
   
   
   
10.2
Other
   
21.8
   
10.5
   
126.3
   
   
158.6
Total
 
$
147.7
 
$
227.1
 
$
370.2
 
$
1,216.2
 
$
1,961.2
Home Fashion Purchase Orders
Purchase orders or contracts for the purchase of certain inventory and other goods and services are not included in the table above. We are not able to determine the aggregate amount of such purchase orders that represent contractual obligations, as purchase orders may represent authorizations to purchase rather than binding agreements. Purchase orders are based on our current needs and are fulfilled by vendors within short time horizons. We do not have significant agreements for the purchase of inventory or other goods specifying minimum quantities or set prices that exceed expected requirements.
Obligations Related to Securities
As discussed in Note 7 to the consolidated financial statements, we have contractual liabilities of $25.4 million related to securities sold not yet purchased. This amount has not been included in the table above as their maturity is not subject to a contract and cannot properly be estimated.
Off Balance Sheet Arrangements


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We do not maintain any off-balance sheet transactions, arrangements, obligations or other relationships with unconsolidated entities or others.
Discussion of Segment Liquidity and Capital Resources
Gaming
Our primary source of cash from our Gaming operating unit is from the operation of our properties. At December 31, 2006, we had cash and cash equivalents of $54.9 million compared to $108.3 million in 2005 and $75.1 million at December 31, 2004. For the year ended December 31, 2006, net cash provided by operating activities (including the operations of the Aquarius) totaled $63.5 million compared to $62.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2005 and $54.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2004. In addition to cash from operations, cash is available to us under the senior secured revolving credit facility entered into by ACEP, as borrower, and certain of its subsidiaries, as guarantors. In May 2006, we entered into an amendment to the senior secured revolving credit facility, increasing the amount of borrowings allowed by it to $60.0 million, subject to compliance with financial and other covenants (discussed below), until May 12, 2010. ACEP borrowed the maximum amount available under the facility, $60.0 million, in order to fund the acquisition of the Aquarius. At December 31, 2006, there were outstanding borrowings under the senior secured revolving credit facility of $40.0 million and availability of $20.0 million.
Our primary use of cash during the year ended December 31, 2006 was for the acquisition of the Aquarius as described below, operating expenses, capital spending, to pay interest on our 7.85% senior secured notes due 2012 and to repay borrowings and interest under ACEP’s senior secured revolving credit facility. Capital spending was approximately $46.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2006 compared to $28.2 million and $14.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively. We have estimated our 2007 capital spending for our existing facilities at approximately $31.1 million, which we anticipate to include approximately $14.9 million to purchase new and convert existing slot machines at the Aquarius and approximately $8.5 million for Aquarius hotel renovations. The remainder of our capital spending estimate for 2007 will be for upgrades or maintenance to our existing assets.
We funded the acquisition of the Aquarius with existing cash and borrowings of $60.0 million, under the senior secured revolving credit facility. We intend to fund the planned capital improvements with existing cash and cash flow from operations. The purchase price, including direct acquisition costs for the Aquarius, was $113.6 million. We currently estimate the cost of the improvements to be approximately $40.0 million through 2008, and have expended approximately $24.4 million through December 31, 2006. The capital improvement plan includes replacing slot machines, hotel renovations, signage and various other improvements.
Our cash used by financing activities in 2006 was primarily used to fund the acquisition of the Aquarius in 2006, to pay for the capital lease on our exterior signage for 2005 and to complete the acquisitions of three Las Vegas, Nevada gaming and entertainment properties from affiliated parties on May 26, 2004.
We believe operating cash flows will be adequate to meet our anticipated requirements for working capital, capital spending and scheduled interest payments on the notes and under the senior secured revolving credit facility, lease payments and other indebtedness at least through the next twelve months. However, additional financing, if needed, may not be available to us, or if available, the financing may not be on terms favorable to us. Our estimates of our reasonably anticipated liquidity needs may not be accurate and new business opportunities or other unforeseen events could occur, resulting in the need to raise additional funds from outside sources.
Additionally, as described above, ACEP has a senior secured revolving credit facility that allows for borrowings of up to $60.0 million, including the issuance of letters of credit of up to $10.0 million. Loans made under the senior secured revolving facility will mature and the commitments under them will terminate in May 2010. The facility contains restrictive covenants similar to those contained in the 7.85% senior secured notes due 2012. In addition, the facility requires that, as of the last date of each fiscal quarter, ACEP’s ratio of consolidated first lien debt to consolidated cash flow be not more than 1.0 to 1.0. As of December 31, 2006, this ratio was less than 1.0 to 1.0. At December 31, 2006, there were $40.0 million of borrowings outstanding under the facility.
In furtherance of our strategy to maximize value for our unitholders and in light of favorable market conditions, we are currently evaluating alternatives for refinancing, recapitalizing and/or selling our Gaming segment.


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Real Estate
Our real estate operating units generate cash through rentals, leases and asset sales (principally sales of rental and residential properties) and the operation of resorts. All of these operations generate cash flows from operations.
Real estate development activities require a significant amount of funds. With our renewed development activity at New Seabury and Grand Harbor, it is expected that cash expenditures in 2007 will approximate $50 million. We expect that such amounts will be funded through advances from AREP’s existing cash reserves and from unit sales and, to the extent such proceeds are insufficient, by AREP from available cash.
During the year ended December 31, 2006, we sold 18 rental real estate properties for $25.3 million, which were unencumbered by mortgage debt.
During the year ended December 31, 2005, we sold 14 rental real estate properties for $52.5 million, which were encumbered by mortgage debt of $10.7 million. Net sales proceeds were $41.8 million. Also in 2005, we sold a resort property for $8.5 million.
Home Fashion
For the year ended December 31, 2006, our Home Fashion segment had a negative cash flow from operations of $36.9 million. Such negative cash flow was principally due to ongoing restructuring efforts partially offset by reductions in working capital. As discussed above, WPI expects to continue its restructuring efforts and, accordingly, expects that restructuring charges and operating losses will continue to be incurred through the end of 2007.
On December 20, 2006, pursuant to a subscription and standby commitment agreement, AREH purchased from WPI, 1,000,000 shares of WPI’s Series A-1 Preferred Stock, par value $0.01 per share, and 1,000,000 shares of WPI’s series A-2 Preferred Stock, par value of $0.01 per share, for an aggregate purchase price of $200.0 million. Each share of Series A-1 and Series A-2 Preferred Stock is convertible into WestPoint common stock at a conversion price of $10.50 per share, subject to adjustment in certain events. However, until certain conditions are met, the Series A-1 and Series A-2 Preferred Stock may not be converted into common stock. In addition, WestPoint may cause the conversion of all Series A-1 or Series A-2 Preferred Stock upon the occurrence of certain events.
On December 21, 2006 WPI used $98.6 million of the proceeds to finance the acquisition of certain bed products manufacturing facilities from Manama Textile Mills WLL in Bahrain. The remainder of the proceeds from the preferred stock offering will provide for additional payments due under this purchase agreement, working capital, capital expenditures, possible additional acquisitions and joint ventures and general corporate purposes.
At December 31, 2006, WPI had approximately $178.5 million of unrestricted cash and cash equivalents.
On June 16, 2006, WPI’s primary operating subsidiary, WestPoint Home, Inc., entered into a $250.0 million senior secured revolving credit facility from Bank of America, N.A. with an expiration date of June 15, 2011. The borrowing availability under the senior credit facility is subject to a monthly borrowing base calculation less outstanding loans, letters of credit and other reserves under the facility. Borrowings under the agreement bear interest, at the election of WestPoint Home, either at the prime rate adjusted by an applicable margin ranging from minus 0.25% to plus 0.50% or at LIBOR adjusted by an applicable margin ranging from plus 1.25% to 2.00%. WestPoint Home pays an unused line fee of 0.25% to 0.275%. Obligations under the agreement are secured by WestPoint Home’s receivables, inventory and certain machinery and equipment.
At December 31, 2006, there were no borrowings under the agreement, but there were outstanding letters of credit of $40.1 million. Based upon the eligibility and reserve calculations within the agreement, WestPoint Home had unused borrowing availability of approximately $122.7 million at December 31, 2006.
The senior secured revolving credit agreement contains various covenants including, among others, restrictions on indebtedness, investments, redemption payments, distributions, acquisition of stock, securities or assets of any other entity and capital expenditures. However, WestPoint Home is not precluded from effecting any of these, if excess availability, as defined after giving effect to any such debt issuance, investment, redemption, distribution or other transition or payment restricted by covenant meets a minimum threshold.


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Capital expenditures by WPI were $11.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2006. Capital expenditures for 2007 are expected to total approximately $25.9 million. During 2006, WPI invested approximately $12.4 million, to acquire a 50% ownership interest in a joint venture in Pakistan for a bath products manufacturing facility. WPI may expend additional amounts in connection with further joint ventures and acquisitions, and such amounts may be significant.
Through a combination of its existing cash on hand and its borrowing availability under the WestPoint Home senior secured revolving credit facility, WPI believes that it has adequate capital resources and liquidity to meet its anticipated requirements to continue its operational restructuring initiatives and for working capital, capital spending and scheduled payments on the notes payable at least through the next twelve months. However, depending upon the levels of additional acquisitions and joint venture investment activity, if any, additional financing, if needed, may not be available to WPI, or if available, the financing may not be on terms favorable to WPI. WPI’s estimates of its reasonably anticipated liquidity needs may not be accurate and new business opportunities or other unforeseen events could occur, resulting in the need to raise additional funds from outside sources.
Distributions
During 2005, we began to pay distributions to our unitholders. Total distributions of $0.40 per unit were declared and paid during 2006 in an aggregate amount of $25.2 million.
On March 31, 2006, we distributed to holders of record of our preferred units as of March 15, 2006, 539,846 additional preferred units. Pursuant to the terms of the preferred units, on February 27, 2007, we declared our scheduled annual preferred unit distribution payable in additional preferred units at the rate of 5% of the liquidation preference of $10.00. The distribution is payable on March 30, 2007 to holders of record as of March 15, 2007. On February 27, 2007, the number of authorized preferred units was increased to 12,100,000.
Our preferred units are subject to redemption at our option on any payment date, and the preferred units must be redeemed by us on or before March 31, 2010. The redemption price is payable, at our option, subject to the indenture, either all in cash or by the issuance of depositary units, in either case, in an amount equal to the liquidation preference of the preferred units plus any accrued but unpaid distributions thereon.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 of our consolidated financial statements. Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. Among others, estimates are used when accounting for valuation of investments, recognition of casino revenues and promotional allowances and estimated costs to complete its land, house and condominium developments. Estimates and assumptions are evaluated on an ongoing basis and are based on historical and other factors believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. The results of these estimates may form the basis of the carrying value of certain assets and liabilities and may not be readily apparent from other sources. Actual results, under conditions and circumstances different from those assumed, may differ from estimates.
We believe the following accounting policies are critical to our business operations and the understanding of results of operations and affect the more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.
Accounting for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
Long-lived assets held and used by us and long-lived assets to be disposed of, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances, such as vacancies and rejected leases, indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable.
In performing the review for recoverability, we estimate the future cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. If the sum of the expected future cash flows, undiscounted and without interest charges, is less than the carrying amount of the asset an impairment loss is recognized. Measurement of an


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impairment loss for long-lived assets that we expect to hold and use is based on the fair value of the asset. Long-lived assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell.
Commitments and Contingencies — Litigation
On an ongoing basis, we assess the potential liabilities related to any lawsuits or claims brought against us. While it is typically very difficult to determine the timing and ultimate outcome of such actions, we use our best judgment to determine if it is probable that we will incur an expense related to the settlement or final adjudication of such matters and whether a reasonable estimation of such probable loss, if any, can be made. In assessing probable losses, we make estimates of the amount of insurance recoveries, if any. We accrue a liability when we believe a loss is probable and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated. Due to the inherent uncertainties related to the eventual outcome of litigation and potential insurance recovery, it is possible that certain matters may be resolved for amounts materially different from any provisions or disclosures that we have previously made.
Use of Estimates in Preparation of Financial Statements
The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the period.
The more significant estimates include (1) the valuation allowances of accounts receivable and inventory, (2) the valuation of long-lived assets, mortgages and notes receivable, marketable equity and debt securities and other investments, (3) costs to complete for land, house and condominium developments, (4) gaming-related liability and promotional programs, (5) deferred tax assets, (6) oil and gas reserve estimates, (7) asset retirement obligations and (8) fair value of derivatives. Actual results may differ from the estimates and assumptions used in preparing the consolidated financial statements.
Income Taxes
No provision has been made for federal, state or local income taxes on the results of operations generated by partnership activities as such taxes are the responsibility of the partners. Our corporate subsidiaries account for their income taxes under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carry forwards.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.
Management periodically evaluates all evidence, both positive and negative, in determining whether a valuation allowance to reduce the carrying value of deferred tax assets is still needed. In 2006 and 2005, we concluded, based on the projections of taxable income, that certain of our corporate subsidiaries more likely than not will realize a partial benefit from their deferred tax assets and loss carry forwards. Ultimate realization of the deferred tax assets is dependent upon, among other factors, our corporate subsidiaries’ ability to generate sufficient taxable income within the carry forward periods and is subject to change depending on the tax laws in effect in the years in which the carry forwards are used.
Forward Looking Statements
Statements included in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” which are not historical in nature are intended to be, and are hereby identified as, “forward looking statements” for purposes of the safe harbor provided by Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended by Public Law 104-67.
Forward looking statements regarding management’s present plans or expectations involve risks and uncertainties and changing economic or competitive conditions, as well as the negotiation of agreements with third parties, which could cause actual results to differ from present plans or expectations, and such differences could be material. Readers should consider that such statements speak only as of the date hereof.


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Certain Trends and Uncertainties
We have in the past and may in the future make forward looking statements. Certain of the statements contained in this document involve risks and uncertainties. Our future results could differ materially from those statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to those discussed in this document. These statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those predicted. Also, please see Item 1A. Risk Factors of this Form 10-K.
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
Market risk is the risk of loss arising from adverse changes in market rates and prices, such as interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates and commodity prices. Our significant market risks are primarily associated with interest rates, equity prices and derivatives. The following sections address the significant market risks associated with our business activities.
Interest Rate Risk
The fair values of our long term debt and other borrowings will fluctuate in response to changes in market interest rates. Increases and decreases in prevailing interest rates generally translate into decreases and increases in fair values of those instruments. Additionally, fair values of interest rate sensitive instruments may be affected by the creditworthiness of the issuer, relative values of alternative investments, the liquidity of the instrument and other general market conditions.
We do not invest in derivative financial instruments, interest rate swaps or other investments that alter interest rate exposure.
We have predominately long-term fixed interest rate debt. Generally, the fair market value of debt securities with a fixed interest rate will increase as interest rates fall, and the fair market value will decrease as interest rates rise. At December 31, 2006, the impact of a 100 basis point increase in interest rates on fixed rate debt would result in a decrease in market value of approximately $40 million. A 100 basis point decrease would result in an increase in market value of approximately $40 million.
Equity Price Risk
The carrying values of investments subject to equity price risks are based on quoted market prices or management’s estimates of fair value as of the balance sheet dates. Market prices are subject to fluctuation and, consequently, the amount realized in the subsequent sale of an investment may significantly differ from the reported market value. Fluctuation in the market price of a security may result from perceived changes in the underlying economic characteristics of the investee, the relative price of alternative investments and general market conditions. Furthermore, amounts realized in the sale of a particular security may be affected by the relative quantity of the security being sold.
Based on a sensitivity analysis for our equity price risks as of December 31, 2006 and 2005 the effects of a hypothetical 20% increase or decrease in market prices as of those dates would result in a gain or loss that would be approximately $132.0 million and $170.0 million, respectively. The selected hypothetical change does not reflect what could be considered the best or worst case scenarios. Indeed, results could be far worse due to the nature of equity markets.


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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
Board of Directors and Partners of
American Real Estate Partners, L.P.
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of American Real Estate Partners, L.P. and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2006 and 2005, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in partners’ equity and comprehensive income, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2006. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Partnership’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits. We did not audit the financial statements of GB Holdings, Inc. and Subsidiaries for the year ended December 31, 2004, which statements reflect losses of $12,822,000 included in the discontinued operations. Those statements were audited by other auditors, whose report thereon has been furnished to us, and our opinion, insofar as it relates to the amounts included for GB Holdings, Inc. and Subsidiaries, is based solely on the report of the other auditors. Those auditors expressed an unqualified opinion with emphasis on a going concern matter on those financial statements in their report dated March 11, 2005. Also, we did not audit the financial statements of ImClone Systems Incorporated and Subsidiary, the investment in which, as discussed in Notes 2 and 7 to the financial statements, is accounted for by the equity method of accounting. The investment in ImClone Systems Incorporated and Subsidiary was $164,307,000 and $97,255,000 as of December 31, 2006 and 2005, respectively, and the equity in its net income was $12,620,000 and $1,375,000 respectively, for the years then ended. The financial statements of ImClone Systems Incorporated and Subsidiary were audited by other auditors whose report has been furnished to us, and our opinion, insofar as it relates to the amounts included for ImClone Systems Incorporated and Subsidiary, is based solely on the reports of the other auditors.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits and the reports of the other auditors provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, based on our audits and the reports of the other auditors, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of American Real Estate Partners, L.P. and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2006 and 2005, and the consolidated results of their operations and their consolidated cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2006 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
As discussed in Notes 2 and 7, in 2006, the Partnership changed the accounting for its investment in ImClone Systems Incorporated and Subsidiary from an available for sale security to the equity method.
We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the effectiveness of American Real Estate Partners, L.P. and Subsidiaries’ internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2006, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) and our report dated March 2, 2007 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
/s/ GRANT THORNTON LLP
New York, New York
March 2, 2007


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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To the Shareholders of GB Holdings, Inc.
We have audited the consolidated statements of operations, changes in shareholders’ equity and cash flows for the year ended December 31, 2004 of GB Holdings, Inc. and subsidiaries. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audit.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the results of operations and cash flows of GB Holdings, Inc. and subsidiaries for the year ended December 31, 2004, in conformity with US generally accepted accounting principles.
The consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that GB Holdings, Inc. will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Notes 1 and 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring net losses, has a net working capital deficiency and has significant debt obligations which are due within one year that raise substantial doubt about its ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Notes 1 and 2. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.
/s/ KPMG LLP
Short Hills, New Jersey
March 11, 2005


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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
To Board of Directors and Stockholders
ImClone Systems Incorporated:
We have audited the consolidated balance sheets of ImClone Systems Incorporated and subsidiary as of December 31, 2006 and 2005, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity (deficit) and comprehensive income, and cash flows for the years then ended, not presented separately herein. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of ImClone Systems Incorporated and subsidiary as of December 31, 2006 and 2005, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
As discussed in notes 2(i) and 11(d) to the consolidated financial statements, the Company adopted the provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123R, “Share-Based Payment,” effective January 1, 2006.
/s/ KPMG LLP
Princeton, New Jersey
March 1, 2007



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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
December 31, 2006 and 2005
   
December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
   
(in $000s, except unit amounts)
 
ASSETS
             
Current assets:
             
Cash and cash equivalents
     
$
1,912,235
     
$
460,091
 
Investments
   
539,115
   
720,526
 
Inventories, net
   
245,502
   
244,239
 
Trade, notes and other receivables, net
   
176,496
   
195,321
 
Other current assets
   
134,987
   
214,860
 
Assets held for sale
   
47,503
   
1,177,397
 
Total current assets
   
3,055,838
   
3,012,434
 
Property, plant and equipment, net:
             
Gaming
   
422,715
   
295,432
 
Real Estate
   
283,974
   
288,254
 
Home Fashion
   
200,382
   
166,026
 
Total property, plant and equipment, net
   
907,071
   
749,712
 
Equity investment and other
   
179,932
   
100,291
 
Intangible assets
   
25,916
   
23,402
 
Other assets
   
75,990
   
77,706
 
Total assets
 
$
4,244,747
 
$
3,963,545
 
               
LIABILITIES AND PARTNERS’ EQUITY
             
Current liabilities:
             
Accounts payable
 
$
69,853
 
$
57,602
 
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities
   
197,792
   
143,427
 
Current portion of long-term debt
   
23,970
   
18,103
 
Securities sold not yet purchased
   
25,398
   
75,883
 
Margin liability on marketable securities
   
   
131,061
 
Liabilities of discontinued operations held for sale
   
   
489,598
 
Total current liabilities
   
317,013
   
915,674
 
Long-term debt
   
1,184,990
   
1,111,666
 
Other non-current liabilities
   
22,212
   
24,007
 
Preferred limited partnership units:
             
$10 per unit liquidation preference, 5% cumulative pay-in-kind; 11,400,000 authorized; 11,340,243 and 10,800,397 issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2006 and 2005, respectively
   
117,656
   
112,067
 
Total long-term liabilities
   
1,324,858
   
1,247,740
 
Total liabilities
   
1,641,871
   
2,163,414
 
Minority interests
   
292,221
   
304,599
 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 20)
             
Partners’ equity
             
Limited partners:
             
Depositary units; 67,850,000 authorized; 62,994,030 issued and 61,856,830 outstanding as of December 31, 2006 and 2005
   
2,524,615
   
1,725,714
 
General partner
   
(202,039
)
 
(218,261
)
Treasury units at cost:
             
1,137,200 depositary units
   
(11,921
)
 
(11,921
)
Partners’ equity
   
2,310,655
   
1,495,532
 
Total liabilities and partners’ equity
 
$
4,244,747
 
$
3,963,545
 


See notes to consolidated financial statements.
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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
Years Ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
   
Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
   
(in 000s, except per unit data)
 
Revenues:
                   
Gaming
     
$
385,699
     
$
327,982
     
$
299,981
 
Real Estate
   
134,575
   
100,299
   
61,557
 
Home Fashion
   
957,656
   
472,681
   
 
     
1,477,930
   
900,962
   
361,538
 
Expenses:
                   
Gaming
   
326,984
   
260,955
   
251,119
 
Real Estate
   
106,621
   
82,512
   
49,681
 
Home Fashion
   
1,108,293
   
495,110
   
 
Holding Company
   
25,822
   
12,478
   
4,327
 
Acquisition costs
   
   
4,664
   
414
 
     
1,567,720
   
855,719
   
305,541
 
Operating (loss) income
   
(89,790
)
 
45,243
   
55,997
 
Other income (expense), net:
                   
Interest expense
   
(106,612
)
 
(91,174
)
 
(47,320
)
Interest income
   
52,672
   
42,791
   
42,145
 
Other income (expense), net
   
99,277
   
(12,861
)
 
24,453
 
Equity in earnings of affiliate
   
12,620
   
1,375
   
 
(Loss) income from continuing operations before income taxes and minority interests
   
(31,833
)
 
(14,626
)
 
75,275
 
Income tax expense
   
(13,271
)
 
(18,170
)
 
(10,099
)
Minority interests
   
68,173
   
10,140
   
 
Income (loss) from continuing operations
   
23,069
   
(22,656
)
 
65,176
 
Discontinued operations:
                   
Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of income taxes
   
154,831
   
(28,544
)
 
11,307
 
Gain on sales of assets, net of income taxes
   
676,444
   
21,849
   
75,197
 
Minority interests
   
(55,511
)
 
3,682
   
2,074
 
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
   
775,764
   
(3,013
)
 
88,578
 
Net earnings (loss)
 
$
798,833
 
$
(25,669
)
$
153,754
 
Net earnings (loss) attributable to:
                   
Limited partners
 
$
782,936
 
$
(20,292
)
$
130,850
 
General partner
   
15,897
   
(5,377
)
 
22,904
 
   
$
798,833
 
$
(25,669
)
$
153,754
 
Net earnings per limited partnership unit:
                   
Basic earnings (loss):
                   
Income (loss) from continuing operations
 
$
0.40
 
$
(0.31
)
$
0.96
 
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
   
12.29
   
(0.05
)
 
1.88
 
Basic earnings (loss) per LP unit
 
$
12.69
 
$
(0.36
)
$
2.84
 
Weighted average limited partnership units outstanding
   
61,857
   
54,085
   
46,098
 
Diluted earnings:
                   
Income (loss) from continuing operations
 
$
0.40
 
$
(0.31
)
$
0.95
 
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
   
12.29
   
(0.05
)
 
1.69
 
Diluted earnings (loss) per LP unit
 
$
12.69
 
$
(0.36
)
$
2.64
 
Weighted average limited partnership units and equivalent partnership units outstanding
   
61,857
   
54,085
   
51,542
 


See notes to consolidated financial statements.
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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN PARTNERS’
EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
Years Ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
   
General
Partner’s
Equity
(Deficit)
 
Limited Partners’
Equity
 
Held in Treasury
 
Total
Partners’
Equity
 
Depositary
Units
 
Preferred
Units
Amounts
 
Units
 
   
(in 000s)
 
Balance, December 31, 2003
     
$
358,239
     
$
1,181,078
     
     
$
(11,921
)     
1,137
     
$
1,527,396
 
Comprehensive income:
             
                 
                 
Net earnings
   
22,904
   
130,850
 
   
 
   
153,754
 
Reclassification of unrealized gains on marketable
securities sold
   
(190
)
 
(9,378
)
   
 
   
(9,568
)
Net unrealized gains on securities available for sale
   
1
   
32
 
   
 
   
33
 
Comprehensive income
   
22,715
   
121,504
 
   
 
   
144,219
 
Capital distribution from American Casino
   
(17,916
)
 
 
   
 
   
(17,916
)
Capital contribution to American Casino
   
22,800
   
 
   
 
   
22,800
 
Arizona Charlies acquisition
   
(125,900
)
 
 
   
 
   
(125,900
)
Change in deferred tax asset related to acquisition of Arizona Charlies
   
2,490
   
 
   
 
   
2,490
 
Net adjustment for Panaco acquisition
   
91,561
   
 
   
 
   
91,561
 
Distribution to general partner
   
(1,919
)
 
 
   
 
   
(1,919
)
Other
   
(19
)
 
(957
)
   
 
   
(976
)
Balance, December 31, 2004
   
352,051
   
1,301,625
 
   
(11,921
)
1,137
   
1,641,755
 
Comprehensive income:
                                 
Net earnings (loss)
   
(5,377
)
 
(20,292
)
   
 
   
(25,669
)
Net unrealized gains (loss) on securities available for sale
   
(83
)
 
(4,114
)
   
 
   
(4,197
)
Other comprehensive income (loss)
   
(2
)
 
(75
)
               
(77
)
Comprehensive loss
   
(5,462
)
 
(24,481
)
   
 
   
(29,943
)
General partner contribution
   
9,279
   
 
   
 
   
9,279
 
AREP Oil & Gas acquisitions
   
(616,740
)
 
444,998
 
   
 
   
(171,742
)
GBH/Atlantic Coast acquisitions
   
46,249
   
12,000
 
   
 
   
58,249
 
Change in reporting entity and other
   
(803
)
 
3,253
 
   
 
   
2,450
 
CEO LP unit options
   
10
   
482
 
   
 
   
492
 
Return of capital to GB Holdings, Inc.
   
(2,598
)
 
 
   
 
   
(2,598
)
Partnership distributions
   
(251
)
 
(12,371
)
   
 
   
(12,622
)
Equity in ImClone capital transactions
   
4
   
208
 
   
 
   
212
 
Balance, December 31, 2005
     
 
(218,261
)     
 
1,725,714
     
     
 
(11,921
)     
1,137
     
 
1,495,532
 
Comprehensive income:
                                 
Net earnings
   
15,897
   
782,936
 
   
 
   
798,833
 
Net unrealized gains on securities available for sale
   
591
   
29,093
 
   
 
   
29,684
 
Other comprehensive income
   
3
   
147
 
   
 
   
150
 
Comprehensive Income
   
16,491
   
812,176
 
   
 
   
828,667
 
CEO LP unit options
   
124
   
6,124
 
   
 
   
6,248
 
Atlantic Coast bond conversion
   
44
   
2,167
 
   
 
   
2,211
 
Partnership distributions
   
(502
)
 
(24,743
)
   
 
   
(25,245
)
Equity in ImClone capital transactions
   
65
   
3,177
 
   
 
   
3,242
 
Balance, December 31, 2006
 
$
(202,039
)
$
2,524,615
 
 
$
(11,921
)
1,137
 
$
2,310,655
 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) at December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004 was $25.4 million, $(4.5) million and $(0.1) million, respectively.


See notes to consolidated financial statements.
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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
Years Ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
   
Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
   
(dollars in thousands)
 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:
Cash Flows from Continuing Operations:
                   
Income (loss) from continuing operations
     
$
23,069
     
$
(22,656
)     
$
65,176
 
Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to net cash provided by
operating activities:
                   
Depreciation and amortization
   
71,454
   
50,335
   
29,646
 
Investment (gains) losses
   
(91,308
)
 
21,260
   
(16,540
)
Preferred LP unit interest expense
   
5,589
   
5,336
   
5,082
 
Minority interest
   
(68,173
)
 
(10,140
)
 
 
Equity in earnings of affiliate
   
(12,620
)
 
(1,375
)
 
 
Stock based compensation expense
   
6,248
   
492
   
 
Deferred income tax expense
   
2
   
8,364
   
7,507
 
Impairment loss on fixed assets
   
33,701
   
   
 
Net cash provided by activities on trading securities
   
70,636
   
28,560
   
 
Other, net
   
(5,927
)
 
(2,571
)
 
(9,690
)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
                   
Decrease (increase) in trade notes and other receivables
   
49,710
   
10,671
   
(7,921
)
Decrease (increase) in other assets
   
34,102
   
(9,684
)
 
(124,004
)
(Increase) decrease in inventory
   
8,822
   
17,880
   
 
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable, accrued expenses and
other liabilities
   
(7,570
)
 
(51,399
)
 
89,477
 
Net cash provided by continuing operations
   
117,735
   
45,073
   
38,733
 
Cash Flows from Discontinued Operations:
                   
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
   
775,764
   
(3,013
)
 
88,578
 
Depreciation, depletion and amortization
   
106,936
   
108,496
   
77,458
 
Change in fair market value of Oil & Gas derivative contracts
   
(99,707
)
 
69,254
   
9,179
 
Impairment loss on GBH
   
   
52,366
   
15,600
 
Net (gain) from sales of businesses and properties
   
(676,444
)
 
(21,849
)
 
(75,197
)
Other, net
   
65,904
   
(30,441
)
 
9,661
 
Net cash provided by discontinued operations
   
172,453
   
174,813
   
125,279
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
   
290,188
   
219,886
   
164,012
 
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:
                   
Cash Flows from Continuing Operations:
                   
Capital expenditures
   
(61,338
)
 
(36,380
)
 
(109,532
)
Purchases of marketable equity and debt securities
   
(243,162
)
 
(764,271
)
 
(283,615
)
Proceeds from sales of marketable equity and debt securities
   
566,575
   
190,287
   
93,556
 
Net proceeds from the sale and disposition of real estate
   
   
8,414
   
43,590
 
Net proceeds from the sale and disposition of fixed assets
   
21,867
   
   
 
Purchase of debt securities of affiliates
   
   
   
(101,500
)
Acquisitions of businesses, net of cash acquired
   
(208,645
)
 
(293,649
)
 
(125,900
)
Other, net
   
   
9,586
   
50,848
 
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities – continuing operations
   
75,297
   
(886,013
)
 
(432,553
)
Cash Flows from Discontinued Operations:
                   
Capital expenditures
   
(306,696
)
 
(326,309
)
 
(132,220
)
Net proceeds from the sales and disposition of assets
   
1,308,713
   
54,752
   
202,344
 
Other, net
   
(18,427
)
 
4,704
   
21,090
 
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities – discontinued operations
   
983,590
   
(266,853
)
 
91,214
 
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
   
1,058,887
   
(1,152,866
)
 
(341,339
)


See notes to consolidated financial statements.
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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS – (continued)
Years Ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
   
Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
2004
 
   
(dollars in thousands)
 
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:
                   
Cash Flows from Continuing Operations:
                   
Partners’ equity:
                   
Members contribution
     
$
     
$
9,279
     
$
22,800
 
Partnership distributions
 
 
(25,245
)
 
(12,622
)
 
(17,916
)
Debt:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Proceeds from issuance of senior notes payable
 
 
 
 
480,000
 
 
565,409
 
Proceeds from credit facilities
 
 
60,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
Repayment of credit facilities
 
 
(21,034
)
 
 
 
 
Net change in due to/from affiliates
 
 
 
 
14,557
 
 
(24,925
)
Proceeds from mortgages payable
 
 
34,250
 
 
4,425
 
 
10,000
 
Mortgages paid upon disposition of properties
 
 
 
 
(3,777
)
 
(26,800
)
Periodic principal payments
 
 
(6,473
)
 
(3,941
)
 
(5,248
)
Debt issuance costs
 
 
(8,257
)
 
(8,952
)
 
(18,111
)
Other, net
 
 
 
 
4,258
 
 
 
Net cash provided by financing activities – continuing operations
 
 
33,241
 
 
483,227
 
 
505,209
 
Cash Flows from Discontinued Operations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities –
discontinued operations
 
 
(24,276
)
 
219,568
 
 
(74,797
Net cash provided by financing activities
 
 
8,965
 
 
702,795
 
 
430,412
 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
 
 
1,358,040
 
 
(230,185
)
 
253,085
 
Net change in cash of assets held for sale
 
 
94,104
 
 
(72,432
)
 
22,125
 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
 
 
460,091
 
 
762,708
 
 
487,498
 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
 
$
1,912,235
 
$
460,091
 
$
762,708
 
                     
Supplemental information
                   
Cash payments for interest, net of amounts capitalized
 
$
106,635
 
$
77,745
 
$
60,472
 
Cash payments for income taxes, net of refunds
 
$
15,439
 
$
10,194
 
$
2,912
 
Conversion of bonds in connection with acquisition of WPI
 
$
 
$
205,850
 
$
 
Net unrealized gains (losses) on securities available for sale
 
$
29,684
 
$
(4,197
)
$
33
 
LP unit issuance
 
$
 
$
456,998
 
$
 
Change in tax asset related to acquisitions
 
$
 
$
7,329
 
$
2,490
 
Debt conversion relating to Atlantic Coast
 
$
2,211
 
$
29,500
 
$
 
Equity received in consideration for sale of oil and gas operations
 
$
231,156
 
$
 
$
 



See notes to consolidated financial statements.
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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
1. Description of Business and Basis of Presentation
General
American Real Estate Partners, L.P., or the Company or AREP, is a master limited partnership formed in Delaware on February 17, 1987. AREP is a diversified holding company owning subsidiaries engaged in the following continuing operating businesses: Gaming; Real Estate; and Home Fashion. In November 2006, we divested our Oil and Gas operating business and our Atlantic City gaming properties. Further information regarding our reportable segments is contained in Note 18.
We own a 99% limited partner interest in American Real Estate Holdings Limited Partnership, or AREH. AREH, the operating partnership, holds our investments and conducts our business operations. Substantially all of our assets and liabilities are owned by AREH and substantially all of our operations are conducted through AREH and its subsidiaries. American Property Investors, Inc., or API, owns a 1% general partner interest in both us and AREH, representing an aggregate 1.99% general partner interest in us and AREH. API is owned and controlled by Mr. Carl C. Icahn.
Under our amended and restated partnership agreement we are permitted to make non-real estate related acquisitions and investments to enhance unitholder value and further diversify our assets. Investments may include equity and debt securities of domestic and foreign issuers. The portion of our assets invested in any one type of security or any single issuer are not limited.
We will conduct our activities in such a manner as not to be deemed an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, or the 1940 Act. Generally, this means that no more than 40% of the Company’s total assets will be invested in investment securities, as such term is defined in the 1940 Act. In addition, we do not intend to invest in securities as our primary business. We will structure our investments to continue to be taxed as a partnership rather than as a corporation under the applicable publicly traded partnership rules of the Internal Revenue Code.
As of December 31, 2006, affiliates of Mr. Icahn owned 9,813,346 preferred units and 55,655,382 depositary units which represented approximately 86.5% and 90% of the outstanding preferred units and depositary units, respectively.
Acquisitions
On August 8, 2005, WestPoint International, Inc., or WPI, our indirect majority-owned subsidiary, completed the acquisition of substantially all of the assets of WestPoint Stevens Inc., or WPS. Operating results for WPI are included with AREP’s results beginning as of August 8, 2005. In December 2006, WPI acquired a manufacturing facility in Bahrain for an aggregate cash consideration of $98.6 million and a seller note of $10.6 million. The purchase price is subject to working capital adjustments.
On May 19, 2006, our wholly-owned subsidiaries, AREP Laughlin Corporation, and AREP Boardwalk Properties LLC, completed the purchases, respectively, of the Flamingo Laughlin Hotel and Casino, now known as the Aquarius Casino Resort, or the Aquarius, in Laughlin, Nevada, and 7.7 acres of land adjacent to The Sands Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey, known as the Traymore site, from affiliates of Harrah’s Operating Company, Inc., or Harrah’s. Operating results for the Aquarius are included with AREP’s results beginning as of May 19, 2006.
Discontinued Operations
On November 17, 2006, our indirect majority owned subsidiary, Atlantic Coast Entertainment Holdings, Inc., completed the sale to Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc., or Pinnacle, of the outstanding membership interests in ACE Gaming LLC, the owner of The Sands and 100% of the equity interests in certain subsidiaries of AREH which own parcels of real estate adjacent to The Sands, including the Traymore site to Pinnacle. See Note 5 for additional information regarding the sale.


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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
1. Description of Business and Basis of Presentation – (continued)
On November 21, 2006, our indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, AREP O & G Holdings LLC, consummated the sale of all of the issued and outstanding membership interests of NEG Oil & Gas LLC to SandRidge Energy, Inc formerly Riata Energy, Inc. See Note 5 for additional information regarding the sale.
Certain of our real estate properties are classified as discontinued operations. The properties classified as discontinued operations have changed during 2006 and, accordingly, certain amounts in the accompanying 2005 and 2004 financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current classification of properties.
The financial position and results of these operations are presented as assets and liabilities of discontinued operations held for sale in the consolidated balance sheets and discontinued operations in the consolidated statements of operations, respectively, for all periods presented in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets.
Filing Status of Subsidiaries
National Energy Group, Inc., or NEGI, and Atlantic Coast are reporting companies under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. In addition, American Casino & Entertainment Properties LLC, or American Casino or ACEP, voluntarily files annual, quarterly and current reports. Each of these reports is separately filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and are publicly available.
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
As discussed in Note 1, we operate in several diversified segments. The accounting policies related to the specific segments or industries are differentiated, as required, in the list of significant accounting policies set out below.
Principles of Consolidation
The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of AREP and the majority-owned subsidiaries in which AREP has a controlling financial interest as of the financial statement date. We are considered to have control if we have a direct or indirect ability to make decisions about an entity’s activities through voting or similar rights. We use the guidance set forth in AICPA Statement of Position No. 78-9, Accounting for Investments in Real Estate Ventures, and Emerging Issues Task Force Issue No. 04-05, Investor’s Accounting for an Investment in a Limited Partnership when the Investor is the Sole General Partner and the Limited Partners have Certain Rights, with respect to our investments in partnerships and limited liability companies. All intercompany balance and transactions are eliminated.
We utilize the equity method of accounting with respect to investments where we exercise significant influence, but not control, over the operating and financial policies of the investee. A voting interest of at least 20% and no greater than 50% is normally a prerequisite for utilizing the equity method. However, we may apply the equity method with less than 20% voting interests based upon the facts and circumstances including representation on the investee’s Board of Directors, contractual veto or approval rights, participation in policy making processes and the existence or absence of other significant owners. In applying the equity method, investments are recorded at cost and subsequently increased or decreased by our proportionate share of the net earnings or losses of the investee. We also record our proportionate share of other comprehensive income items of the investee as a component of our comprehensive income. Dividends or other equity distributions are recorded as a reduction of the investment.
In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, assets and liabilities transferred between entities under common control are accounted for at historical cost in a manner similar to a pooling of interests, and the financial statements of previously separate companies for periods prior to their acquisition are retrospectively adjusted on a combined basis.


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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
As required by FIN 46R, Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities, we evaluate our investments and other financial relationships to determine whether any further entities are required to be consolidated.
Retrospective Application of Change in Accounting for Investment in ImClone Systems Incorporated
In the fourth quarter of 2006 we changed our method of accounting for our investment in ImClone Systems Incorporated, or ImClone, to the equity method of accounting. Previously, we accounted for our investment in ImClone as an available for sale security. In accordance with SFAS No. 115, Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities, available for sale securities are reported at fair value, with unrealized gains and losses excluded from earnings and reported in a separate component of shareholders’ equity as “Other Comprehensive Income.” We record our proportionate equity in the ImClone’s earnings and capital transactions on a one calendar quarter time lag.
From the first quarter of 2005 through the third quarter of 2006, AREP and certain other affiliates of Mr. Icahn purchased shares of common stock of ImClone. As of September 30, 2006, the total shares of ImClone held by AREP as a percentage of ImClone’s total outstanding shares was 5.4%. Also, in October 2006, Mr. Icahn was appointed Chairman of the board of directors of ImClone and certain other changes to ImClone’s board of directors took place which resulted in Mr. Icahn having the ability to exercise significant influence over the operating and financial policies of ImClone.
In assessing the applicability of Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 18, The Equity Method of Accounting for Investments in Common Stock, we have determined that, because of the ability of Mr. Icahn to exercise significant influence over ImClone’s operating and financial policies, we were required to adopt the equity method of accounting for our investment in ImClone, and accordingly the 2005 financial statements have been adjusted to apply the new method retrospectively. See Note 7 for information regarding the effect of this change on net income and total partners equity.
Use of Estimates in Preparation of Financial Statements
The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the period.
The more significant estimates include (1) the valuation allowances of accounts receivable and inventory, (2) the valuation of long-lived assets, mortgages and notes receivable, marketable equity and debt securities and other investments, (3) costs to complete for land, house and condominium developments, (4) gaming-related liability and promotional programs, (5) deferred tax assets, (6) oil and gas reserve estimates, (7) asset retirement obligations and (8) fair value of derivatives. Actual results may differ from the estimates and assumptions used in preparing the consolidated financial statements.
Cash and Cash Equivalents
We consider short-term investments, which are highly liquid with original maturities of three months or less at date of purchase, to be cash equivalents.
Restricted Cash
Restricted cash results primarily from escrow deposits, funds held in connection with collateralizing letters of credit and proceeds from securities sold but not yet purchased that require cash to be on deposit with the relevant brokerage institution. Restricted cash was $87.4 million and $161.2 million at December 31, 2006 and 2005, respectively, and is included as a component of other current assets in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.


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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
Investments
Investments in equity and debt securities are classified as either trading or available for sale based upon whether we intend to hold the investment for the foreseeable future. Trading securities are valued at quoted market value at each balance sheet date with the unrealized gains or losses reflected in the consolidated statements of operations. Available for sale securities are carried at fair value on our balance sheet. Unrealized holding gains and losses on available for sale securities are excluded from earnings and reported as a separate component of partners’ equity and when sold are reclassified out of partners’ equity. For purposes of determining gains and losses, the cost of securities is based on specific identification.
A decline in the market value of any available for sale security below cost that is deemed to be other than temporary results in an impairment that is charged to earnings and the establishment of a new cost basis for the investment. Dividend income is recorded when declared and interest income is recognized when earned.
Accounts Receivable
An allowance for doubtful accounts is determined through analysis of the aging of accounts receivable at the date of the consolidated financial statements, assessments of collectibility based on an evaluation of historic and anticipated trends, the financial condition of our customers, and an evaluation of the impact of economic conditions. Our allowance for doubtful accounts is an estimate based on specifically identified accounts as well as general reserves based on historical experience.
Inventories
Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (first-in, first-out method) or market. The cost of manufactured goods, which are held only by WPI, includes material, labor and factory overhead. We maintain reserves for estimated excess, slow moving and obsolete inventory as well as inventory whose carrying value is in excess of net realizable value.
Inventories consisted of the following (in $000s):
   
December 31, 
 
   
2006
 
2005
 
               
Raw materials and supplies                                                  
     
$
32,059
     
$
33,083
 
Goods in process
 
 
83,592
 
 
100,337
 
Finished goods
 
 
129,851
 
 
110,819
 
 
 
$
245,502
 
$
244,239
 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Land and construction-in-progress costs are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Interest is capitalized on expenditures for long-term projects until a salable condition is reached. The interest capitalization rate is based on the interest rate on specific borrowings to fund the projects.
Buildings, furniture and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation unless declines in the values of the fixed assets are considered other than temporary, at which time the property is written down to net realizable value. Depreciation is principally computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the particular property or equipment, as follows: buildings and improvements, 4 to 40 years; furniture, fixtures and equipment, 1 to 18 years. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the life of the lease or the life of the improvement, whichever is shorter.


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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred. The cost of additions and improvements is capitalized and depreciated over the remaining useful lives of the assets. The cost and accumulated depreciation of assets sold or retired are removed from our consolidated balance sheet, and any gain or loss is recognized in the year of disposal.
Real estate properties held for use or investment, other than those accounted for under the financing method, are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation. Where declines in the values of the properties are determined to be other than temporary, the cost basis of the property is written down to net realizable value. A property is classified as held for sale at the time management determines that the criteria in SFAS No. 144 Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets have been met. Properties held for sale are carried at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Such properties are no longer depreciated and their results of operations are included in discontinued operations. As a result of the reclassification of certain real estate to properties held for sale during the year ended December 31, 2006, income and expenses of such properties are reclassified to discontinued operations for all prior periods. If management determines that a property classified as held for sale no longer meets the criteria in SFAS 144, the property is reclassified as held for use.
Intangible Assets
Intangible assets consist of trademarks of WPI (Note 4). In accordance with SFAS No. 142, Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives are no longer amortized, but instead tested for impairment.
Accounting for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
We evaluate our long-lived assets in accordance with the application of SFAS No. 144. Accordingly, we evaluate the realizability of our long-lived assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Inherent in the reviews of the carrying amounts of the above assets are various estimates, including the expected usage of the asset. Assets must be tested at the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows exist. Future cash flow estimates are, by their nature, subjective and actual results may differ materially from our estimates. If our ongoing estimates of future cash flows are not met, we may have to record impairment charges in future accounting periods. Our estimates of cash flows are based on the current regulatory, social and economic climates, recent operating information and budgets of the operating property.
Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations
Effective January 1, 2003, we adopted the provisions of SFAS No. 143, Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations. SFAS No. 143 provides accounting requirements for costs associated with legal obligations to retire tangible, long-lived assets. Under SFAS No. 143, an asset retirement obligation is recorded at fair value in the period in which it is incurred by increasing the carrying amount for the related long-lived asset which is depreciated over its useful life. In each subsequent period, the liability is adjusted to reflect the passage of time and changes in the estimated future cash flows underlying the obligation. Our asset retirement obligations relate to our oil and gas operating unit, which was sold to SandRidge in November 2006.
Oil and Natural Gas Properties
We utilized the full cost method of accounting for our crude oil and natural gas properties. Under the full cost method, all productive and nonproductive costs incurred in connection with the acquisition, exploration and development of crude oil and natural gas reserves are capitalized and amortized on the units-of-production method based upon total proved reserves. The costs of unproven properties are excluded from the amortization calculation until the individual properties are evaluated and a determination is made as to whether reserves exist. Conveyances of properties, including gains or losses on abandonment of properties, are treated as adjustments to the cost of crude oil and natural gas properties, with no gain or loss recognized.


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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
Under the full cost method, the net book value of oil and natural gas properties, less related deferred income taxes, may not exceed the estimated after-tax future net revenues from proved oil and natural gas properties, discounted at 10% per year (the ceiling limitation). In arriving at estimated future net revenues, estimated lease operating expenses, development costs, abandonment costs, and certain production related and ad-valorem taxes are deducted. In calculating future net revenues, prices and costs in effect at the time of the calculation are held constant indefinitely, except for changes which are fixed and determinable by existing contracts. The net book value of oil and gas properties is compared to the ceiling limitation on a quarterly basis. We did not incur a ceiling write-down in 2006, 2005 or 2004.
We have capitalized internal general and administrative costs of $1.5 million, $1.1 million and $1.0 million for the period from January 1, 2006 to November 21, 2006 and the years ended December 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively, with respect to our oil and gas activities. We have not capitalized interest expense. In November 2006, we sold our oil and gas operating units to SandRidge. Therefore, as of December 31, 2006 we have no capitalized costs relating to these operations.
Our oil and natural gas properties are subject to extensive Federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations. These laws, which are constantly changing, regulate the discharge of materials into the environment and may require us to remove or mitigate the environment effects of the disposal or release of petroleum or chemical substances at various sites. Environmental expenditures are expensed or capitalized depending on their future economic benefit. Expenditures that relate to an existing condition caused by past operations and that have no future economic benefits are expensed. Liabilities for expenditures of a non-capital nature are recorded when environmental assessment and/or remediation is probable, and the costs can be reasonably estimated.
Derivatives
From time to time our subsidiaries enter into derivative contracts, including (a) commodity price collar agreements entered into by our Oil & Gas segment to reduce our exposure to price risk in the spot market for natural gas and oil and (b) commodity futures contracts, forward purchase commodity contracts and option contracts entered into by our Home Fashion segment primarily to manage our exposure to cotton commodity price risk. We follow SFAS No. 133, Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, which was amended by SFAS No. 138, Accounting for Certain Derivative Instruments and Certain Hedging Activities. These pronouncements established accounting and reporting standards for derivative instruments and for hedging activities, which generally require recognition of all derivatives as either assets or liabilities in the balance sheet at their fair value. The accounting for changes in fair value depends on the intended use of the derivative and its resulting designation. Through December 31, 2006, we did not use hedge accounting and accordingly, all unrealized gains and losses are reflected in our consolidated statement of operations.
Revenue and Expense Recognition
Home Fashion — WPI records revenue when the following criteria are met: persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the price to the customer is fixed and determinable and collectibility is reasonably assured. Unless otherwise agreed in writing, title and risk of loss pass from WPI to the customer when WPI delivers the merchandise to the designated point of delivery, to the designated point of destination, or to the designated carrier, free on board. Provisions for certain rebates, sales incentives, product returns and discounts to customers are recorded in the same period the related revenue is recorded.
Customer incentives are provided to WPI customers primarily for new sales programs. These incentives begin to accrue when a commitment has been made to the customer and are recorded as a reduction to sales.


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AMERICAN REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, L.P. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies – (continued)
Gaming— Gaming segment revenue consists of casino, hotel and restaurant revenues. We recognize revenues in accordance with industry practice. Casino revenue is the net win from gaming activities (the difference between gaming wins and losses). Casino revenues are net of ac