AKAM 10Q 6/30/2014

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
______________________________________________ 
FORM 10-Q
 ______________________________________________
(Mark One)
x
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2014
or
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from                      to    
            

Commission file number 0-27275
______________________________________________ 
Akamai Technologies, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 
04-3432319
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

8 Cambridge Center
Cambridge, MA 02142
(617) 444-3000
(Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number,
Including Area Code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)
______________________________________________ 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer  x
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
Smaller reporting company o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  ¨    No  x
The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock as of August 6, 2014: 178,163,132


Table of Contents

AKAMAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

FORM 10-Q

FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED JUNE 30, 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
Page
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
 
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013
 
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 2.
Item 6.
 
 
 
 


2

Table of Contents

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements (Unaudited)

AKAMAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, expect share data)
June 30,
2014
 
December 31,
2013
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
254,165

 
$
333,891

Marketable securities
502,608

 
340,005

Accounts receivable, net of reserves of $6,618 and $3,703 at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013, respectively
325,385

 
271,988

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
88,047

 
62,096

Deferred income tax assets
29,462

 
21,734

Total current assets
1,199,667

 
1,029,714

Property and equipment, net
536,637

 
450,287

Marketable securities
735,629

 
573,026

Goodwill
1,049,047

 
757,368

Acquired intangible assets, net
149,218

 
77,429

Deferred income tax assets
2,317

 
2,325

Other assets
96,142

 
67,536

Total assets
$
3,768,657

 
$
2,957,685

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
Accounts payable
$
70,534

 
$
73,710

Accrued expenses
158,646

 
150,385

Deferred revenue
48,182

 
36,952

Other current liabilities
5,930

 
2,119

Total current liabilities
283,292

 
263,166

Deferred revenue
4,056

 
3,199

Deferred income tax liabilities
40,385

 
4,737

Convertible senior notes
595,385

 

Other liabilities
72,795

 
57,152

Total liabilities
995,913

 
328,254

Commitments and contingencies

 

Stockholders’ equity:
 
 
 
Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized; 700,000 shares designated as Series A Junior Participating Preferred Stock; no shares issued or outstanding

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value; 700,000,000 shares authorized; 181,546,263 shares issued and 178,270,354 shares outstanding at June 30, 2014 and 178,580,696 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2013
1,844

 
1,808

Additional paid-in capital
4,742,423

 
4,561,929

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
2,497

 
(2,091
)
Treasury stock, at cost, 3,275,909 shares at June 30, 2014 and no shares at December 31, 2013
(187,491
)
 

Accumulated deficit
(1,786,529
)
 
(1,932,215
)
Total stockholders’ equity
2,772,744

 
2,629,431

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
$
3,768,657

 
$
2,957,685


The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

3

Table of Contents

AKAMAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
    
 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands, except per share data)
2014
 
2013
 
2014
 
2013
Revenue
$
476,035

 
$
378,106

 
$
929,537

 
$
746,152

Costs and operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of revenue
149,318

 
124,705

 
288,930

 
245,097

Research and development
32,052

 
20,597

 
60,286

 
42,502

Sales and marketing
91,462

 
67,825

 
172,527

 
130,515

General and administrative
81,880

 
61,351

 
158,041

 
116,731

Amortization of acquired intangible assets
8,403

 
5,734

 
15,251

 
11,794

Restructuring charges
569

 
391

 
1,304

 
822

Total costs and operating expenses
363,684

 
280,603

 
696,339

 
547,461

Income from operations
112,351

 
97,503

 
233,198

 
198,691

Interest income
1,740

 
1,477

 
3,379

 
3,085

Interest expense
(4,516
)
 

 
(6,457
)
 

Other (expense) income, net
(899
)
 
341

 
(1,780
)
 
209

Income before provision for income taxes
108,676

 
99,321

 
228,340

 
201,985

Provision for income taxes
35,790

 
37,426

 
82,654

 
68,603

Net income
$
72,886

 
$
61,895

 
$
145,686

 
$
133,382

Net income per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
$
0.41

 
$
0.35

 
$
0.82

 
$
0.75

Diluted
$
0.40

 
$
0.34

 
$
0.80

 
$
0.73

Shares used in per share calculations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
178,081

 
177,891

 
178,393

 
177,895

Diluted
180,841

 
181,388

 
181,439

 
181,475


The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

4

Table of Contents

AKAMAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
 
2014
 
2013
Net income
$
72,886

 
$
61,895

 
$
145,686

 
$
133,382

Other comprehensive income (loss):

 

 

 

Foreign currency translation adjustments
1,459

 
(3,746
)
 
2,826

 
(7,760
)
Change in unrealized gain (loss) on investments, net of income tax (provision) benefit of $(514), $913, $(391), and $62 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively
2,674

 
(1,626
)
 
1,762

 
(1,555
)
Other comprehensive income (loss)
4,133

 
(5,372
)
 
4,588

 
(9,315
)
Comprehensive income
$
77,019

 
$
56,523

 
$
150,274

 
$
124,067


The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.


5

Table of Contents

AKAMAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
Net income
$
145,686

 
$
133,382

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
112,228

 
86,501

Stock-based compensation
56,792

 
47,732

Provision for doubtful accounts
464

 
1,199

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation
(19,661
)
 
(9,622
)
Provision for deferred income taxes
21,840

 

Amortization of debt discount and issuance costs
6,457

 

Loss from disposal of property and equipment
38

 
309

Loss on investments
393

 

Change in fair value of contingent consideration
300

 

Gain and other activity related to divestiture of a business

 
(2,281
)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects of acquisitions and divestitures:
 
 
 
Accounts receivable
(41,254
)
 
(35,203
)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
(12,998
)
 
(16,208
)
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
21,459

 
23,695

Deferred revenue
4,750

 
6,612

Other current liabilities
1,419

 
(223
)
Other non-current assets and liabilities
(8,666
)
 
(1,605
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
289,247

 
234,288

Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
Cash (paid) received for acquired businesses, net of cash acquired
(386,532
)
 
80

Purchases of property and equipment
(97,992
)
 
(102,222
)
Capitalization of internal-use software development costs
(56,533
)
 
(35,127
)
Purchases of short- and long-term marketable securities
(863,591
)
 
(309,875
)
Proceeds from sales of short- and long-term marketable securities
354,313

 
77,720

Proceeds from maturities of short- and long-term marketable securities
183,809

 
209,473

Proceeds from the sale of property and equipment
584

 
426

Other non-currents assets and liabilities
1,444

 
(362
)
Net cash used in investing activities
(864,498
)
 
(159,887
)
Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
Proceeds from the issuance of convertible senior notes, net of issuance costs
678,735

 

Proceeds from the issuance of warrants related to convertible senior notes
77,970

 

Purchase of note hedge related to convertible senior notes
(101,292
)
 

Payment of acquired debt and capital leases
(17,862
)
 

Proceeds related to the issuance of common stock under stock plans
57,999

 
28,261

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation
19,661

 
9,622

Employee taxes paid related to net share settlement of stock-based awards
(34,248
)
 
(21,125
)
Repurchases of common stock
(187,491
)
 
(82,782
)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
493,472

 
(66,024
)
Effects of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
2,053

 
(5,501
)
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents
(79,726
)
 
2,876

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
333,891

 
201,989

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
$
254,165

 
$
204,865



6

Table of Contents

AKAMAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS, continued

 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:
 
 
 
Cash paid for income taxes
$
60,360

 
$
35,796

Non-cash financing and investing activities:
 
 
 
Purchases of property and equipment and capitalization of internal-use software development costs included in accounts payable and accrued expenses
36,146

 
14,344

Capitalization of stock-based compensation
7,727

 
6,183

Convertible note receivable received for divestiture of a business

 
18,882


The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

7

Table of Contents

AKAMAI TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1. Nature of Business and Basis of Presentation

Akamai Technologies, Inc. (the “Company”) provides cloud services for delivering, optimizing and securing online content and business applications. The Company's globally distributed platform comprises more than 150,000 servers in over 1,200 networks in over 90 countries. The Company was incorporated in Delaware in 1998 and is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Company currently operates in one industry segment: providing services for accelerating, improving and securing the delivery of content and applications over the Internet.

The accompanying interim consolidated financial statements are unaudited and have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for interim financial information. These financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in the accompanying financial statements.

Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in the Company’s annual audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been condensed in, or omitted from these interim financial statements. Accordingly, the unaudited consolidated financial statements included herein should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 3, 2014.

The results of operations presented in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations that may be expected for any future periods. In the opinion of management, these unaudited consolidated financial statements include all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, that are necessary for a fair statement of the results of all interim periods reported herein.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued updated guidance and disclosure requirements for recognizing revenue. The new revenue recognition standard provides a five-step analysis of transactions to determine when and how revenue is recognized.  The core principle is that a company should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. This guidance will be effective for the Company on January 1, 2017 and may be applied retrospectively to each period presented or as a cumulative-effect adjustment as of the date of adoption.  The Company is evaluating the potential impact of adopting this new accounting guidance.

Revision of Prior Period Amounts

During the third quarter of 2013, the Company identified immaterial classification errors in its historical consolidated statements of cash flows. The errors relate to the timing of cash payments for property and equipment, cash receipts from employees for common stock related to the Company's employee stock purchase plan and cash payments for lease deposits. The cash flows for these items were improperly reflected as changes in operating assets and liabilities rather than as investing or financing activities. There was no impact to the net change in cash and cash equivalents. The Company concluded these errors are immaterial to all annual and quarterly periods previously presented and has reflected the corrections as a revision to the consolidated statements of cash flows previously filed.


8

Table of Contents

The effect of the revisions to the consolidated statements of cash flows for the six months ended June 30, 2013, is as follows (in thousands):

 
As Previously Reported
 
Adjustment
 
As Revised
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects from acquisitions:
 
 
 
 
 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
(19,106
)
 
2,898

 
(16,208
)
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
25,311

 
(1,616
)
 
23,695

Other non-current assets and liabilities
(1,849
)
 
244

 
(1,605
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
232,762

 
1,526

 
234,288

Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Purchases of property and equipment
(100,847
)
 
(1,375
)
 
(102,222
)
Other non-current assets and liabilities

 
(362
)
 
(362
)
Net cash used in investing activities
(158,150
)
 
(1,737
)
 
(159,887
)
Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Proceeds related to the issuance of common stock under stock plans
28,050

 
211

 
28,261

Net cash used in financing activities
(66,235
)
 
211

 
(66,024
)
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
2,876

 

 
2,876


2. Fair Value Measurements

The following is a summary of available-for-sale marketable securities held as of June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 (in thousands):

 
 
 
Gross Unrealized
 
 
 
Classification on Balance Sheet
 
Amortized Cost
 
Gains
 
Losses
 
Aggregate
Fair Value
 
Short-Term
Marketable
Securities
 
Long-Term
Marketable
Securities
As of June 30, 2014
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Certificates of deposit
$
53

 
$

 
$

 
$
53

 
$

 
$
53

Commercial paper
39,974

 

 
(9
)
 
39,965

 
39,965

 

Corporate bonds
923,490

 
1,404

 
(475
)
 
924,419

 
384,619

 
539,800

U.S. government agency obligations
273,792

 
94

 
(86
)
 
273,800

 
78,024

 
195,776

 
$
1,237,309

 
$
1,498

 
$
(570
)
 
$
1,238,237

 
$
502,608

 
$
735,629

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of December 31, 2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Certificates of deposit
$
222

 
$

 
$

 
$
222

 
$
173

 
$
49

Corporate bonds
736,945

 
1,197

 
(281
)
 
737,861

 
278,318

 
459,543

U.S. government agency obligations
174,982

 
51

 
(85
)
 
174,948

 
61,514

 
113,434

 
$
912,149

 
$
1,248

 
$
(366
)
 
$
913,031

 
$
340,005

 
$
573,026


Unrealized gains and unrealized temporary losses on investments classified as available-for-sale are included within accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in the consolidated balance sheets. Upon realization, those amounts are reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) to interest income in the statements of operations. The Company holds for investment one corporate bond, which is classified as an available-for-sale marketable security, in a continuous unrealized loss position for more than 12 months, with an insignificant unrealized loss and a fair value of $1.9 million as of June 30, 2014. The unrealized loss is attributable to changes in interest rates. The Company does not believe any unrealized losses represent other than temporary impairments based on the evaluation of available evidence. As of December 31, 2013, there were no securities in a continuous unrealized loss position for more than 12 months.


9

Table of Contents

The following table details the fair value measurements within the fair value hierarchy of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 (in thousands):

 
Total Fair Value
 
Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using
 
 
Level 1    
 
Level 2    
 
Level 3    
As of June 30, 2014
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash Equivalents and Marketable Securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Money market funds
$
1,257

 
$
1,257

 
$

 
$

Certificates of deposit
53

 
53

 

 

Commercial paper
39,965

 

 
39,965

 

Corporate bonds
924,419

 

 
924,419

 

U.S. government agency obligations
273,800

 

 
273,800

 

 
$
1,239,494

 
$
1,310

 
$
1,238,184

 
$

Other Liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Contingent consideration obligation related to Velocius acquisition
$
(2,900
)
 
$

 
$

 
$
(2,900
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of December 31, 2013
 
 
 
Cash Equivalents and Marketable Securities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Money market funds
$
40,482

 
$
40,482

 
$

 
$

Certificates of deposit
3,418

 
3,418

 

 

Commercial paper
29,999

 

 
29,999

 

Corporate bonds
737,861

 

 
737,861

 

U.S. government agency obligations
174,948

 

 
174,948

 

 
$
986,708

 
$
43,900

 
$
942,808

 
$

Other Assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Note receivable
$
22,879

 
$

 
$

 
22,879

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other Liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Contingent consideration obligation related to Velocius acquisition
$
(2,600
)
 
$

 
$

 
$
(2,600
)

As of June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013, the Company grouped money market funds and certificates of deposit using a Level 1 valuation because market prices for such investments are readily available in active markets. As of June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013, the Company grouped commercial paper, U.S. government agency obligations and corporate bonds using a Level 2 valuation because quoted prices for identical or similar assets are available in markets that are inactive.

When developing fair value estimates, the Company maximizes the use of observable inputs and minimizes the use of unobservable inputs. When available, the Company uses quoted market prices to measure fair value. The valuation technique used to measure fair value for the Company's Level 1 and Level 2 assets is a market approach, using prices and other relevant information generated by market transactions involving identical or comparable assets. If market prices are not available, the fair value measurement is based on models that use primarily market-based parameters including yield curves, volatilities, credit ratings and currency rates. In certain cases where market rate assumptions are not available, the Company is required to make judgments about assumptions market participants would use to estimate the fair value of a financial instrument.

The valuation technique used to measure fair value of the Company's Level 3 liability, which consists of contingent consideration related to the acquisition of Velocius Networks, Inc. ("Velocius") (Note 5), is primarily an income approach. The significant unobservable input used in the fair value measurement of the Velocius contingent consideration is the likelihood of achieving development milestones to integrate the acquired technology into the Company's technology.

The valuation technique used to measure fair value for the Company's Level 3 asset, which consisted of a $25.0 million face value convertible note receivable, is primarily an income approach, where the expected weighted average future cash flows are discounted back to present value. The significant unobservable inputs used in the fair value measurement of the convertible

10

Table of Contents

note receivable are the probability of conversion to equity and the fair value of equity into which the note is convertible. In the second quarter of 2014, the note was amended. Under the terms of the amendment, the note became convertible into shares of preferred stock of the issuer valued at $12.5 million at the time of conversion; $6.3 million became due and payable (and was paid) during the second quarter of 2014 and the balance of $6.3 million is due and payable in the third quarter of 2014.

Increases or decreases in the underlying assumptions used to value the Company's Level 3 assets and liabilities held at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013, could increase or decrease the fair value estimates recorded in the consolidated balance sheets.

Contractual maturities of the Company’s available-for-sale marketable securities held at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 were as follows (in thousands):

 
June 30,
2014
 
December 31,
2013
Due in 1 year or less
$
502,608

 
$
340,005

Due after 1 year through 5 years
735,629

 
573,026

 
$
1,238,237

 
$
913,031


The following table reflects the activity for the Company’s major classes of assets and liabilities measured at fair value using Level 3 inputs for the six months ended June 30, 2014 (in thousands):
 
 
Other Assets:
Note Receivable
 
Other Liabilities:
Contingent Consideration Obligation
Balance as of January 1, 2014
$
22,879

 
$
(2,600
)
Unrealized gain on convertible note receivable included in other comprehensive income
2,121

 

Amendment of the convertible note receivable for preferred stock of the issuer and cash
(25,000
)
 
$

Fair value adjustment to contingent consideration included in general and administrative expense

 
(300
)
Balance as of June 30, 2014
$

 
$
(2,900
)

3. Accounts Receivable

Net accounts receivable consisted of the following as of June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 (in thousands):
 
 
June 30,
2014
 
December 31,
2013
Trade accounts receivable
$
239,581

 
$
175,391

Unbilled accounts receivable
92,422

 
100,300

Gross accounts receivable
332,003

 
275,691

Allowance for doubtful accounts
(774
)
 
(708
)
Reserve for cash-basis customers
(5,844
)
 
(2,995
)
Total accounts receivable reserves
(6,618
)
 
(3,703
)
Accounts receivable, net
$
325,385

 
$
271,988



11

Table of Contents

4. Goodwill and Acquired Intangible Assets

The change in the carrying amount of goodwill for the six months ended June 30, 2014 was as follows (in thousands):

Balance as of January 1, 2014
$
757,368

Acquisition of Prolexic Technologies, Inc.
291,679

Balance as of June 30, 2014
$
1,049,047


The Company tests goodwill for impairment at least annually. Through the date the consolidated financial statements were issued, no triggering events had occurred that would indicate a potential impairment exists.

Acquired intangible assets that are subject to amortization consist of the following as of June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 (in thousands):

 
June 30, 2014
 
December 31, 2013
 
Gross
Carrying
Amount
 
Accumulated Amortization
 
Net
Carrying
Amount
 
Gross
Carrying
Amount
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net
Carrying
Amount
Completed technology
$
92,431

 
$
(42,299
)
 
$
50,132

 
$
65,631

 
$
(35,476
)
 
$
30,155

Customer-related intangible assets
173,600

 
(82,859
)
 
90,741

 
115,100

 
(75,563
)
 
39,537

Non-compete agreements
8,890

 
(3,385
)
 
5,505

 
7,950

 
(2,623
)
 
5,327

Trademarks and trade names
4,200

 
(1,360
)
 
2,840

 
3,400

 
(990
)
 
2,410

Acquired license rights
490

 
(490
)
 

 
490

 
(490
)
 

Total
$
279,611

 
$
(130,393
)
 
$
149,218

 
$
192,571

 
$
(115,142
)
 
$
77,429


Aggregate expense related to amortization of acquired intangible assets for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 was $8.4 million and $15.3 million, respectively. Aggregate expense related to amortization of acquired intangible assets for the three and six months ended June 30, 2013 was $5.7 million and $11.8 million, respectively. Based on the Company’s acquired intangible assets as of June 30, 2014, aggregate expense related to amortization of acquired intangible assets is expected to be $16.8 million for the remainder of 2014, and $26.8 million, $25.2 million, $23.1 million and $16.2 million for 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018, respectively.

5. Business Acquisitions

Prolexic Acquisition

On February 18, 2014, the Company acquired all of the outstanding preferred and common stock of Prolexic Technologies, Inc. ("Prolexic") in exchange for $392.1 million in cash and the assumption of unvested stock options. The goal of acquiring Prolexic is to provide customers with a comprehensive portfolio of security solutions designed to defend an enterprise’s Web and IP infrastructure against application-layer, network-layer and data center attacks delivered via the Internet. The consolidated financial statements include the operating results of Prolexic from the date of acquisition. The revenue and earnings included in the Company's consolidated financial statements since the acquisition date are not material. Pro forma results of the operations have not been presented because the effects are not material to the consolidated financial statements. Acquisition-related costs were $4.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014.

The allocation of the purchase price has been finalized, with the exception of evaluating certain accrued expenses, property and equipment and tax-related assets and liabilities. The Company is in the process of gathering the facts and circumstances existing as of the acquisition date in order to finalize the valuation of these items. During the second quarter of 2014, the Company made immaterial adjustments to the allocation of the purchase price.



12

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The following table presents the preliminary allocation of the purchase price for Prolexic (in thousands):

Total purchase consideration
 
$
392,104

 
 
 
Allocation of the purchase consideration:
 
 
Cash
 
$
33,072

Accounts receivable
 
11,208

Property and equipment
 
12,225

Identifiable intangible assets
 
87,040

Goodwill
 
291,679

Deferred tax assets
 
16,000

Other current and long-term assets
 
5,850

Total assets acquired
 
457,074

Other current liabilities
 
(6,019
)
Current deferred revenue
 
(5,812
)
Deferred tax liabilities
 
(33,723
)
 Debt, capital leases and other long-term liabilities
 
(19,416
)
Total liabilities assumed
 
(64,970
)
Net assets acquired
 
$
392,104


The value of the goodwill can be attributed to a number of business factors, including a trained technical and sales workforce and the fair value of expected cost synergies to be realized. The total amount of goodwill related to the acquisition of Prolexic expected to be deducted for tax purposes is $62.4 million.

The following were the identified intangible assets acquired and their respective weighted average useful lives (in thousands, except for years):

 
Gross Carrying Amount
 
Weighted Average Useful Life (in years)
Completed technologies
$
26,800

 
6.9
Customer-related intangible assets
58,500

 
10.4
Non-compete agreements
940

 
3.0
Trademark
800

 
4.9
Total
$
87,040

 
 

Velocius Acquisition

On November 8, 2013, the Company acquired Velocius in exchange for $4.3 million in cash. In addition, the Company recorded a liability of $2.6 million for contingent consideration related to expected achievement of post-closing milestones. The maximum potential payout of the contingent consideration is $3.0 million and as of June 30, 2014, the fair value of the liability is $2.9 million.

The Company acquired Velocius with a goal of complementing its hybrid cloud optimization strategy for optimizing IP application traffic across the Internet for remote and branch-end users. The Company allocated $5.4 million of the cost of the acquisition to goodwill and $2.5 million to acquired intangible assets. The allocation of the purchase price was finalized in the first quarter of 2014. The total weighted average useful life of the intangible assets acquired from Velocius is 7.9 years. The value of the goodwill from the acquisition can be attributed to a number of business factors, including a trained technical workforce and cost synergies. The total amount of goodwill related to the acquisition of Velocius expected to be deducted for tax purposes is $0.3 million.


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Strategic Network Transaction

On November 30, 2012, the Company entered into a strategic alliance with AT&T Services, Inc. ("AT&T"). Under the agreement, AT&T became a reseller of the Company's services and the Company acquired certain assets and contracted to purchase bandwidth, co-location and related services from AT&T. The total consideration was $55.0 million, of which $27.5 million was paid during the third quarter of 2013 and $27.5 million was paid during the first quarter of 2014.

6. Convertible Senior Notes

In February 2014, the Company issued $690.0 million par value of convertible senior notes due 2019 (the "Notes"). The Notes are senior unsecured obligations of the Company, do not bear regular interest and mature on February 15, 2019, unless repurchased or converted prior to maturity.

At their option, holders may convert their Notes prior to the close of business on the business day immediately preceding August 15, 2018 only under the following circumstances:

during any calendar quarter commencing after the calendar quarter ended June 30, 2014 (and only during such calendar quarter), if the last reported sale price of the Company's common stock for at least 20 trading days (whether or not consecutive) during the period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on the last trading day of the immediately preceding calendar quarter is greater than or equal to 130% of the conversion price on each applicable trading day;

during the five business day period after any five consecutive trading day period in which the trading price per $1,000 principal amount of Notes for each trading day of the measurement period was less than 98% of the product of the last reported sale price of the Company's common stock and the conversion rate on each such trading day; or

upon the occurrence of specified corporate events.

On or after August 15, 2018, holders may convert all or any portion of their Notes at any time prior to the close of business on the second scheduled trading day immediately preceding the maturity date, regardless of the foregoing circumstances.

Upon conversion, the Company, at its election, may pay or deliver to holders cash, shares of the Company's common stock or a combination of cash and shares of the Company's common stock. The initial conversion rate is 11.1651 shares of the Company's common stock per $1,000 principal amount, which is equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $89.56 per share, subject to adjustments in certain events, and represents a potential conversion into 7.7 million shares.

In accounting for the issuance of the Notes, the Company separated the Notes into liability and equity components. The carrying cost of the liability component was calculated by measuring the fair value of a similar debt obligation that does not have an associated convertible feature. The carrying amount of the equity component representing the conversion option was determined by deducting the fair value of the liability component from the par value of the Notes. The difference between the principal amount of the Notes and the proceeds allocated to the liability component (“debt discount”), is amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method over the term of the Notes. The equity component is recorded in additional paid-in capital in the consolidated balance sheet and will not be remeasured as long as it continues to meet the conditions for equity classification.

In accounting for the transaction costs related to the issuance of the Notes, the Company allocated the total transaction costs incurred to the liability and equity components based on their relative values. Transaction costs attributable to the liability component are being amortized to interest expense over the term of the Notes, and transaction costs attributable to the equity component are netted with the equity component of the Notes in stockholders’ equity.


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Table of Contents

The Notes consist of the following components (in thousands):

 
June 30, 2014
Liability component:
 
Principal
$
690,000

Less: debt discount, net of amortization
(94,615
)
Net carrying amount
$
595,385

 
 
Equity component:
$
101,276


The estimated fair value of the Company's Notes at June 30, 2014 was $705.8 million. The fair value was determined based on data points other than quoted prices that are observable, either directly or indirectly, and has been classified as Level 2 within the fair value hierarchy. Based on the closing price of the Company's common stock of $61.06 on June 30, 2014, the value of the Notes if converted to common stock was less than the principal amount of $690.0 million.

The Company used $62.0 million of the proceeds from the offering to repurchase shares of its common stock, concurrently with the issuance of the Notes. The repurchase was made in accordance with the stock repurchase plan previously approved by the Board of Directors (Note 7). Additionally, $23.3 million of the proceeds was used for the net cost of convertible note hedge and warrant transactions. The Company intends to use the remaining net proceeds for working capital and other general corporate purposes, as well as for potential acquisitions and strategic transactions.

Note Hedge

To minimize the impact of potential dilution upon conversion of the Notes, the Company entered into convertible note hedge transactions with respect to its common stock. The Company paid $101.3 million for the note hedge transactions. The note hedge transactions cover approximately 7.7 million shares of the Company’s common stock at a strike price that corresponds to the initial conversion price of the Notes, also subject to adjustment, and are exercisable upon conversion of the Notes.  The note hedge transactions are intended to reduce dilution in the event of conversion of the Notes.

Warrants

Separately, the Company entered into warrant transactions, whereby the Company sold warrants to acquire, subject to anti-dilution adjustments, up to 7.7 million shares of the Company’s common stock at a strike price of approximately $104.49 per share. The Company received aggregate proceeds of $78.0 million from the sale of the warrants.  The convertible note hedge and warrant transactions will generally have the effect of increasing the conversion price of the Notes to approximately $104.49 per share.

Interest Expense

The Notes do not bear regular interest, but have an effective interest rate of 3.2% attributable to the conversion feature. The following table sets forth total interest expense included in the statement of operations related to the Notes (in thousands):

 
For the Three Months Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2014
Amortization of debt discount
$
442

 
$
630

Amortization of debt issuance costs
4,671

 
6,661

Capitalization of interest expense
(597
)
 
(834
)
Total interest expense
$
4,516

 
$
6,457



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Table of Contents

7. Stockholders’ Equity

Share Repurchase Program

In January 2013, the Board of Directors authorized a $150.0 million extension of its share repurchase program, effective for a twelve-month period beginning February 1, 2013. In October 2013, the Board of Directors authorized a new $750.0 million share repurchase program, effective from October 16, 2013 through December 31, 2016. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2014, the Company repurchased 1.3 million and 3.3 million shares of its common stock for $71.3 million and $187.5 million, respectively. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2013, the Company repurchased 1.1 million and 2.2 million shares of its common stock for $42.5 million and $82.8 million, respectively.

Stock-Based Compensation

The following table summarizes stock-based compensation included in the Company’s consolidated statements of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013 (in thousands):
 
 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2014
 
2013
Cost of revenue
$
3,076

 
$
2,718

 
$
5,871

 
$
5,345

Research and development
5,061

 
3,867

 
9,538

 
8,236

Sales and marketing
12,796

 
9,799

 
23,328

 
19,230

General and administrative
10,745

 
8,417

 
18,055

 
14,921

Total stock-based compensation
31,678

 
24,801

 
56,792

 
47,732

Provision for income taxes
(10,156
)
 
(9,345
)
 
(18,380
)
 
(16,309
)
Total stock-based compensation, net of income taxes
$
21,522

 
$
15,456

 
$
38,412

 
$
31,423


In addition to the amounts of stock-based compensation reported in the table above, the Company’s consolidated statements of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively, include stock-based compensation reflected as a component of amortization of capitalized internal-use software of $2.0 million and $3.9 million, respectively, before income taxes.

8. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

The following table summarizes the changes in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), which is reported as a component of stockholders' equity, for the six months ended June 30, 2014 (in thousands):

 
Foreign Currency Translation Adjustments
 
Net Unrealized Gain on Investments
 
Total
Balance as of January 1, 2014
$
(6,715
)
 
$
4,624

 
$
(2,091
)
Other comprehensive income
2,826

 
1,762

 
4,588

Balance as of June 30, 2014
$
(3,889
)
 
$
6,386

 
$
2,497


The tax effect on accumulated unrealized gain on investments was insignificant as of June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013. Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) to net income were insignificant for the six months ended June 30, 2014.


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9. Income Taxes

The Company’s effective income tax rate, including discrete items, was 36.2% and 34.0% for the six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The effective income tax rate is based upon estimated income for the year, the estimated composition of the income in different jurisdictions and discrete adjustments, if any, in the applicable quarterly periods, including retroactive changes in tax legislation, settlements of tax audits or assessments, the resolution or identification of tax position uncertainties and acquisitions of other companies. The discrete items in the first six months of 2014 include a deferred tax charge, the tax effect of certain stock options and interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions.

For the six months ended June 30, 2014, the effective income tax rate was higher than the federal statutory tax rate mainly due to the effects of accounting for stock-based compensation in accordance with the authoritative guidance for share-based payments and state income tax, partially offset by income from foreign jurisdictions with lower tax rates. For the six months ended June 30, 2013, the effective income tax rate was lower than the federal statutory tax rate mainly due to the composition of income in foreign jurisdictions that is taxed at lower rates compared to the statutory tax rates in the United States, as well as the reinstatement of the federal research and development credit at the beginning of 2013, which included a one-time retroactive impact for fiscal year 2012.

10. Net Income per Share

Basic net income per share is computed using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the applicable period. Diluted net income per share is computed using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, plus the dilutive effect of potential common stock. Potential common stock consists of shares issuable pursuant to stock options, restricted stock units (“RSUs”), deferred stock units, convertible senior notes and warrants issued by the Company. The dilutive effect of outstanding awards and convertible securities is reflected in diluted earnings per share by application of the treasury stock method.

The following table sets forth the components used in the computation of basic and diluted net income per share for three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013 (in thousands, except per share data):
 
 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2014
 
2013
Numerator:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
72,886

 
$
61,895

 
$
145,686

 
$
133,382

Denominator:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shares used for basic net income per share
178,081

 
177,891

 
178,393

 
177,895

Effect of dilutive securities:

 

 
 
 
 
Stock options
1,242

 
1,724

 
1,312

 
1,750

RSUs and deferred stock units
1,518

 
1,773

 
1,734

 
1,830

Convertible senior notes

 

 

 

Warrants related to issuance of convertible senior notes

 

 

 

Shares used for diluted net income per share
180,841

 
181,388

 
181,439

 
181,475

Basic net income per share
$
0.41

 
$
0.35

 
$
0.82

 
$
0.75

Diluted net income per share
$
0.40

 
$
0.34

 
$
0.80

 
$
0.73



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Table of Contents

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, certain potential outstanding shares from stock options, service-based RSUs, convertible notes and warrants were excluded from the computation of diluted net income per share because the effect of including these items would be anti-dilutive. Additionally, certain performance-based RSUs were excluded from the computation of diluted net income per share because the underlying performance conditions for such RSUs had not been met as of these dates. The number of potentially outstanding shares excluded from the computation of diluted net income per share for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013 are as follows (in thousands):

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2014
 
2013
Stock options
474

 
1,888

 
563

 
2,018

Service-based RSUs
1,008

 
159

 
761

 
327

Performance-based RSUs
575

 
1,148

 
575

 
1,148

Convertible senior notes
7,704

 

 
7,704

 

Warrants related to issuance of convertible senior notes
7,704

 

 
7,704

 


The calculation of assumed proceeds used to determine the diluted weighted average shares outstanding under the treasury stock method in the periods presented was adjusted by tax windfalls and shortfalls associated with all of the Company’s outstanding stock awards. Such windfalls and shortfalls are computed by comparing the tax deductible amount of outstanding stock awards to their grant date fair values and multiplying the results by the applicable statutory tax rate. A positive result creates a windfall, which increases the assumed proceeds, and a negative result creates a shortfall, which reduces the assumed proceeds.


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Table of Contents

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

This quarterly report on Form 10-Q, particularly Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations set forth below, and notes to our unaudited consolidated financial statements included herein contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are subject to risks and uncertainties and are based on the beliefs and assumptions of our management as of the date hereof based on information currently available to our management. Use of words such as “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “estimates,” “should,” “forecasts,” “if,” “continues,” “goal,” “likely” or similar expressions indicates a forward-looking statement. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Actual results may differ materially from the forward-looking statements we make. See “Risk Factors” elsewhere in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q for a discussion of certain risks associated with our business. We disclaim any obligation to update forward-looking statements as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Our management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based upon our unaudited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q, which we have prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, or GAAP, for interim periods and with Regulation S-X promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act. The preparation of these unaudited consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and related items, including, but not limited to, revenue recognition, accounts receivable and related reserves, valuation and impairment of marketable securities, goodwill and acquired intangible assets, capitalized internal-use software costs, impairment and useful lives of long-lived assets, income tax, and stock-based compensation. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances at the time they are made. Actual results may differ from our estimates. See the section entitled “Application of Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” in our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013 for further discussion of our critical accounting policies and estimates.

Overview

We provide cloud services for delivering, optimizing and securing online content and business applications. We primarily derive income from sales of services to customers executing contracts with terms of one year or longer. We believe that this emphasis on longer-term contracts generally allows us to have a consistent and predictable base level of revenue which is important to our financial success. Accordingly, to be successful, we must maintain our base of recurring revenue contracts by minimizing customer cancellations or terminations and limiting the impact of price reductions reflected in contract renewals and build on that base by adding new customers and increasing the amount and value of services, features and functionalities that our existing customers purchase. Accomplishing these goals requires that we compete effectively in the marketplace on the basis of quality, price and overall attractiveness of our services and technology.

Our revenue is impacted by a number of factors, including our ability to maintain our base of committed recurring revenues, the timing and variability of customer-specific one-time events, the prices we are able to charge for our services, the amount of traffic we serve on our network and the impact of seasonal variations on our business. We have observed the following trends related to our revenue in recent years:

On a consistent basis, we have been able to offset lost committed recurring revenue by adding new customers and increasing sales of incremental services to our existing customers. We have also experienced increases in the rate of traffic delivered to our customers that use our solutions for video, gaming, social media and software downloads.

The unit prices paid by some of our customers have declined, reflecting the impact of competition. These price reductions have primarily impacted customers for which we deliver high volumes of traffic over our network, such as media customers.

We have experienced variations in certain types of revenue from quarter to quarter; in particular, we experience higher revenue in the fourth quarter of the year for some of our solutions as a result of the holiday season. We also experience lower revenue in the summer months, particularly in Europe, from both e-commerce and media customers because overall Internet use declines during that time. In addition, we experience quarterly variations in revenue attributable to the nature and timing of software and gaming releases by our customers using our software download solutions.


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Table of Contents

Our profitability is also impacted by our expense levels, including direct costs to support our revenue, such as co-location and bandwidth costs, and expenses incurred to support strategic initiatives that we anticipate will generate revenue in the future. We have observed the following trends in recent years:

We have increased headcount to support our revenue growth and strategic initiatives, and as a result, our payroll and related compensation costs have increased. We increased our headcount by more than 800 employees in 2013 to 3,908 employees at year end, which is net of approximately 70 employees who were part of the divestiture of our Advertising Decision Solutions, or ADS, business in the first quarter of 2013. We hired an additional 650 employees during the first half of 2014, including approximately 200 employees who were part of the acquisition of Prolexic Technologies, Inc., or Prolexic. We expect to continue to hire additional employees and expand globally in support of our strategic initiatives.

We have continued to reduce our network bandwidth costs per unit and to invest in internal-use software development with the goal of improving the performance and efficiency of our network. Our total bandwidth costs may increase in the future as a result of expected higher traffic levels, but we believe such costs would be partially offset by anticipated continued reductions in bandwidth costs per unit. To achieve these lower bandwidth costs per unit, we must effectively route traffic over our network through lower cost providers and continue to reduce our overall bandwidth pricing.

Co-location costs are a significant percentage of total cost of revenue. By improving our internal-use software and managing our hardware deployments to enable us to use servers more efficiently, we have been able to manage the growth of co-location costs. We expect to continue to scale our network in the future and will need to manage our co-location costs to maintain current levels of profitability.

In February 2014, we completed the acquisition of Prolexic. Prolexic is expected to be slightly dilutive to our earnings per share in its first full year. Revenues and expenses from the acquisition have been included in our earnings since the acquisition date of February 18, 2014. Also in February 2014, we completed an offering of $690.0 million par value of convertible senior notes. The notes do not bear regular interest, but have an effective interest rate of 3.2% attributable to the conversion feature.

Results of Operations

The following table sets forth, as a percentage of revenue, consolidated statements of operations data for the periods indicated:

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
2014
 
2013
Revenue
100.0
 %
 
100.0
%
 
100.0
 %
 
100.0
%
Cost of revenue
31.4

 
33.0

 
31.1

 
32.8

Research and development expense
6.7

 
5.4

 
6.5

 
5.7

Sales and marketing expense
19.2

 
17.9

 
18.6

 
17.5

General and administrative expense
17.2

 
16.2

 
17.0

 
15.6

Amortization of acquired intangible assets
1.8

 
1.5

 
1.6

 
1.6

Restructuring charges
0.1


0.1

 
0.1


0.1

Total costs and operating expenses
76.4

 
74.1

 
74.9

 
73.3

Income from operations
23.6

 
25.9

 
25.1

 
26.7

Interest income
0.4

 
0.4

 
0.4

 
0.4

Interest expense
(0.9
)
 

 
(0.7
)
 

Other (expense) income, net
(0.2
)
 
0.1

 
(0.2
)
 

Income before provision for income taxes
22.9

 
26.4

 
24.6

 
27.1

Provision for income taxes
7.5

 
9.9

 
8.9

 
9.2

Net income
15.4
 %
 
16.5
%
 
15.7
 %
 
17.9
%


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Table of Contents

Revenue

Revenue during the periods presented was as follows (in thousands):

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Revenue
$
476,035

 
$
378,106

 
25.9
%
 
$
929,537

 
$
746,152

 
24.6
%

During the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, the increase in our revenue as compared to the same periods in 2013 was driven by continued strong demand for our services across all of our solutions and geographies. For the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, no single customer accounted for 10% or more of revenue.

For each of the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, approximately 28% of our revenue was derived from our operations located outside of the United States. No single country outside of the United States accounted for 10% or more of revenue during any of these periods.

During the first half of 2014, we experienced strong revenue growth from our operations in the Asia Pacific region and continued improvement in revenue growth from our operations in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, primarily driven by strength in our Performance and Security Solutions. Changes in foreign currency exchange rates positively impacted our revenue by $3.0 million and $1.3 million during the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, respectively, as compared to the same periods in 2013.

For the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, resellers accounted for 25% and 24%, respectively, of revenue as compared to 20% of revenue for the same periods in 2013. The increase in revenue from resellers was attributable to continued traction with our carrier channel partners, as well as contributions from Prolexic's reseller relationships.

The following table quantifies the contribution to revenue during the periods presented from our solution categories (in thousands):

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Media Delivery Solutions
$
216,174

 
$
179,418

 
20.5
 %
 
$
431,007

 
$
360,606

 
19.5
 %
Performance and Security Solutions
217,415

 
167,881

 
29.5

 
415,392

 
324,523

 
28.0

Service and Support Solutions
42,446

 
31,429

 
35.1

 
83,138

 
58,894

 
41.2

Advertising Decision Solutions and other

 
(622
)
 
(100.0
)
 

 
2,129

 
(100.0
)
Total revenue
$
476,035

 
$
378,106

 
25.9
 %
 
$
929,537

 
$
746,152

 
24.6
 %

The increase in Media Delivery Solutions revenue for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, as compared to the same periods in 2013, was due to strong demand across most of our customer base. We experienced particularly strong growth from our software download, gaming, video and social media customers.

The increase in Performance and Security Solutions revenue for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, as compared to the same periods in 2013, was partially due to increased revenue attributable to Prolexic. Additionally, there was an increase in demand for our web performance and cloud security solutions.

The increase in the Service and Support Solutions revenue for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, as compared to the same periods in 2013, was due to increases in sales of our services and support offerings due to strong service attachment rates for customers of our Media Delivery and Performance and Security Solutions.

The ADS business was divested in the first quarter of 2013.


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Table of Contents

Cost of Revenue

Cost of revenue consisted of the following for the periods presented (in thousands):

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Bandwidth fees
$
29,411

 
$
25,996

 
13.1
%
 
$
58,247

 
$
50,710

 
14.9
%
Co-location fees
28,874

 
27,972

 
3.2

 
56,894

 
55,442

 
2.6

Network build-out and supporting services
11,250

 
8,333

 
35.0

 
21,297

 
17,948

 
18.7

Payroll and related costs
36,274

 
27,521

 
31.8

 
67,692

 
52,748

 
28.3

Stock-based compensation, including amortization of prior capitalized amounts
4,995

 
4,584

 
9.0

 
9,620

 
9,031

 
6.5

Depreciation of network equipment
25,660

 
20,026

 
28.1

 
50,451

 
38,497

 
31.1

Amortization of internal-use software
12,854

 
10,273

 
25.1

 
24,729

 
20,721

 
19.3

Total cost of revenue
$
149,318

 
$
124,705

 
19.7
%
 
$
288,930

 
$
245,097

 
17.9
%
As a percentage of revenue
31.4
%
 
33.0
%
 
 
 
31.1
%
 
32.8
%
 
 

The increase in total cost of revenue for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014 as compared to the same periods in 2013 was primarily due to increases in:

payroll and related costs of service personnel due to headcount growth to support our Service and Support Solutions revenue growth, as well as headcount growth to support our other solution categories;
amounts paid to network providers for bandwidth fees to support the increase in traffic served on our network; and
depreciation and amortization of network equipment and internal-use software as we continued to invest in our infrastructure.

In recent years, we have reduced our network bandwidth costs per unit and have successfully managed our co-location fees, which contributed to the decrease in our cost of revenue as a percentage of revenue during the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014 as compared to the same periods in 2013.

We have long-term purchase commitments for bandwidth usage and co-location services with various network and Internet service providers. Our minimum commitments related to bandwidth usage and co-location services may vary from period to period depending on the timing and length of contract renewals with our service providers. There have been no significant changes to the commitments reported in our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013, other than normal period to period variations.

We believe that cost of revenue will increase during the remainder of 2014 as compared to the first six months of 2014, primarily because we expect to deploy more servers and deliver more traffic on our network, which will result in higher expenses associated with the increased traffic and additional co-location fees.  Such costs are likely to be partially offset by lower bandwidth costs per unit and continued efficiency in network deployment. Additionally, for the remaining quarters of 2014, we anticipate amortization of internal-use software development costs to increase, along with higher payroll and related costs associated with an increase in headcount of our network and professional services personnel. We plan to continue to make investments in our network in the expectation that our customer base and sales of services to our existing customers will continue to grow.


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Research and Development Expenses

Research and development expenses consisted of the following for the periods presented (in thousands):

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Payroll and related costs
$
46,373

 
$
32,482

 
42.8
%
 
$
88,804

 
$
64,304

 
38.1
%
Stock-based compensation
5,061

 
3,867

 
30.9

 
9,538

 
8,237

 
15.8

Capitalized salaries and related costs
(22,056
)
 
(16,950
)
 
30.1

 
(42,056
)
 
(32,446
)
 
29.6

Other expenses
2,674

 
1,198

 
123.2

 
4,000

 
2,407

 
66.2

Total research and development
$
32,052

 
$
20,597

 
55.6
%
 
$
60,286

 
$
42,502

 
41.8
%
As a percentage of revenue
6.7
%
 
5.4
%
 
 
 
6.5
%
 
5.7
%
 
 

The increase in research and development expenses during the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, as compared to the same periods in 2013, was due to increases in payroll and related costs as a result of continued growth in headcount to support investments in new product development, partially offset by increases in capitalized salaries and related costs.

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred, other than certain internal-use software development costs eligible for capitalization. These development costs consist of external consulting expenses and payroll and related costs for personnel involved in the development of internal-use software used to deliver our services and operate our network. During the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, we capitalized $3.5 million and $6.9 million, respectively, of stock-based compensation. During the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2013, we capitalized $3.1 million and $5.9 million, respectively, of stock-based compensation. These capitalized internal-use software costs are amortized to cost of revenue over their estimated useful lives of two years.

We believe that research and development expenses will increase in absolute dollars during the remainder of 2014 as we expect to continue to hire additional development personnel in order to make improvements to our core technology and develop new and enhanced services.

Sales and Marketing Expenses

Sales and marketing expenses consisted of the following for the periods presented (in thousands):

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Payroll and related costs
$
62,093

 
$
44,124

 
40.7
%
 
$
116,777

 
$
85,198

 
37.1
%
Stock-based compensation
12,796

 
9,799

 
30.6

 
23,328

 
19,230

 
21.3

Marketing programs and related costs
7,259

 
6,514

 
11.4

 
17,779

 
14,361

 
23.8

Other expenses
9,314

 
7,388

 
26.1

 
14,643

 
11,726

 
24.9

Total sales and marketing
$
91,462

 
$
67,825

 
34.8
%
 
$
172,527

 
$
130,515

 
32.2
%
As a percentage of revenue
19.2
%
 
17.9
%
 
 
 
18.6
%
 
17.5
%
 
 

The increase in sales and marketing expenses during the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, as compared to the same periods in 2013, was primarily due to higher payroll and related costs, as we invested in our sales and marketing organization, and an increase in marketing programs and related costs in support of our go-to-market strategy and ongoing geographic expansion.

We believe that sales and marketing expenses will increase in absolute dollars during the remainder of 2014 as compared to the first six months of 2014 due to an expected increase in payroll and related costs as a result of continued headcount growth in our sales and marketing organization.


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Table of Contents

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses consisted of the following for the periods presented (in thousands):
 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Payroll and related costs
$
35,714

 
$
24,569

 
45.4
 %
 
$
68,024

 
$
48,398

 
40.6
 %
Stock-based compensation
10,745

 
8,417

 
27.7

 
18,055

 
14,921

 
21.0

Depreciation and amortization
9,876

 
6,228

 
58.6

 
18,049

 
11,804

 
52.9

Facilities-related costs
12,478

 
10,315

 
21.0

 
25,472

 
19,937

 
27.8

Provision for doubtful accounts
274

 
167

 
64.1

 
171

 
530

 
(67.7
)
Acquisition-related costs
444

 
(1,073
)
 
141.4

 
3,836

 
(736
)
 
621.2

Professional and other fees
12,349

 
12,728

 
(3.0
)
 
24,434

 
21,877

 
11.7

Total general and administrative
$
81,880

 
$
61,351

 
33.5
 %
 
$
158,041

 
$
116,731

 
35.4
 %
As a percentage of revenue
17.2
%
 
16.2
%
 
 
 
17.0
%
 
15.6
%
 
 

The increase in general and administrative expenses for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, as compared to the same periods in 2013, was primarily due to the expansion of company infrastructure to support investments in engineering, go-to-market capacity and enterprise expansion initiatives. In particular, we increased general and administrative headcount and our facility footprint, which increased payroll and related costs, facilities-related costs and depreciation and amortization. In addition, acquisition-related costs increased for the six-month period ended June 30, 2014 due to the acquisition of Prolexic.

During the remainder of 2014, we expect general and administrative expenses to increase in absolute dollars as compared to the first six months of 2014 due to anticipated higher payroll and related costs and facilities-related costs attributable to increased hiring, investment in information technology and planned facility expansion.

Amortization of Acquired Intangible Assets

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Amortization of acquired intangible assets
$
8,403

 
$
5,734

 
46.5
%
 
$
15,251

 
$
11,794

 
29.3
%
As a percentage of revenue
1.8
%
 
1.5
%
 
 
 
1.6
%
 
1.6
%
 
 

The increase in amortization of acquired intangible assets for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014 as compared to the same periods in 2013 was primarily due to the amortization of assets related to the acquisition of Prolexic. Based on our intangible assets at June 30, 2014, we expect amortization of acquired intangible assets to be approximately $16.8 million for the remainder of 2014, and $26.8 million, $25.2 million, $23.1 million and $16.2 million for 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018, respectively.

Restructuring Charges

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Restructuring charges
$
569

 
$
391

 
45.5
%
 
$
1,304

 
$
822

 
58.6
%
As a percentage of revenue
0.1
%
 
0.1
%
 
 
 
0.1
%
 
0.1
%
 
 


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The restructuring charges for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014 consisted of severance and related expenses as a result of the acquisition of Prolexic, in addition to a contract termination fee during the three months ended June 30, 2014. The charges for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2013 consisted of pending workforce claims prior to 2013.

Interest Income

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Interest income
$
1,740


$
1,477

 
17.8
%
 
$
3,379

 
$
3,085

 
9.5
%
As a percentage of revenue
0.4
%
 
0.4
%
 
 
 
0.4
%
 
0.4
%
 
 

For the periods presented, interest income consists of interest earned on invested cash balances and marketable securities.

Interest Expense

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Interest expense
$
(4,516
)
 
$

 
100.0
%
 
$
(6,457
)
 
$

 
100.0
%
As a percentage of revenue
(0.9
)%
 
%
 
 
 
(0.7
)%
 
%
 
 

For the periods presented, interest expense consists of the amortization of the debt discount and debt issuance costs related to our convertible senior notes issued in February 2014.

Other (Expense) Income, Net

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Other (expense) income, net
$
(899
)
 
$
341

 
(363.6
)%
 
$
(1,780
)
 
$
209

 
(951.7
)%
As a percentage of revenue
(0.2
)%
 
0.1
%
 
 
 
(0.2
)%
 
%
 
 

Other (expense) income, net primarily represents net foreign exchange gains and losses incurred and other non-operating expense and income items. The fluctuations in other expense, net for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2014, as compared to the same periods in 2013, were primarily due to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations on inter-company and other non-functional currency transactions. Other (expense) income, net may fluctuate in the future based upon changes in foreign exchange rates or other events.

Provision for Income Taxes

 
For the Three Months
Ended June 30,
 
For the Six Months
Ended June 30,
(in thousands)
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
 
2014
 
2013
 
% Change
Provision for income taxes
$
35,790

 
$
37,426

 
(4.4
)%
 
$
82,654

 
$
68,603

 
20.5
%
As a percentage of revenue
7.5
%
 
9.9
%
 
 
 
8.9
%
 
9.2
%
 
 
Effective income tax rate
32.9
%
 
37.7
%
 
 
 
36.2
%
 
34.0
%
 
 

For the six months ended June 30, 2014, our effective income tax rate was higher than the statutory rate due primarily to the effects of accounting for stock-based compensation in accordance with the authoritative guidance for share-based payments and state income taxes, partially offset by income from foreign jurisdictions that is taxed at lower rates compared to the statutory tax

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Table of Contents

rates in the United States. For the six-month period ended June 30, 2013, our effective income tax rate was lower than the federal statutory tax rate mainly due to the reinstatement of the federal research and development credit at the beginning of 2013, which included a one-time retroactive impact for fiscal year 2012, as well as the composition of income in foreign jurisdictions that is taxed at lower rates. The effective income tax rate is based upon the estimated income for the year, the estimated composition of the income in different jurisdictions and discrete adjustments, if any, in the applicable quarterly periods, including settlements of tax audits or assessments, the resolution or identification of tax position uncertainties and acquisitions of other companies.

The increase in the provision for income taxes in the six-month period ended June 30, 2014 as compared to the same period in 2013 was mainly due to the increase in operating income in 2014, a change in the composition of projected income in different jurisdictions and the expiration of the federal research and development credit at the end of 2013, partially offset by the domestic production activities deduction.

While we expect our effective income tax rate to decrease during the remainder of 2014, due to discrete items in the first quarter of 2014 that had a negative impact on our tax rate, this expectation does not take into consideration the effect of potential other one-time discrete items that may be recorded in the future. The effective tax rate could be materially different depending on the nature and timing of dispositions of incentive stock options and other employee equity awards. Further, our effective tax rate may fluctuate within a fiscal year and from quarter to quarter due to items arising from discrete events, including settlements of tax audits and assessments, the resolution or identification of tax position uncertainties and acquisitions of other companies.

In determining our net deferred tax assets and valuation allowances, annualized effective tax rates and cash paid for income taxes, management is required to make judgments and estimates about domestic and foreign profitability, the timing and extent of the utilization of net operating loss carryforwards, applicable tax rates, transfer pricing methodologies and tax planning strategies. Judgments and estimates related to our projections and assumptions are inherently uncertain; therefore, actual results could differ materially from our projections.

We have recorded certain tax reserves to address potential exposures involving our income tax and sales and use tax positions. These potential tax liabilities result from the varying application of statutes, rules, regulations and interpretations by different taxing jurisdictions. Our estimate of the value of these tax reserves reflects assumptions based on past experiences and judgments about the interpretation of statutes, rules and regulations by taxing jurisdictions. It is possible that the ultimate tax liability or benefit from these matters may be materially greater or less than the amount that we have estimated.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

In addition to providing financial measurements based on GAAP, we publicly discuss additional financial measures that are not prepared in accordance with GAAP, or non-GAAP financial measures. Management uses non-GAAP financial measures, in addition to GAAP financial measures, to understand and compare operating results across accounting periods, for financial and operational decision making, for planning and forecasting purposes and to evaluate our financial performance. These non-GAAP financial measures are non-GAAP income from operations, non-GAAP operating margin, non-GAAP net income, non-GAAP net income per diluted share, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin, as discussed below.

Management believes that these non-GAAP financial measures reflect our ongoing business in a manner that allows for meaningful comparisons and analysis of trends in our business, as they exclude expenses and gains that may be infrequent, unusual in nature or otherwise not reflective of our ongoing operating results. Management also believes that these non-GAAP financial measures provide useful information to investors in understanding and evaluating our operating results and future prospects in the same manner as management and in comparing financial results across accounting periods and to those of peer companies.

The non-GAAP financial measures do not replace the presentation of our GAAP financial measures and should only be used as a supplement to, not as a substitute for, our financial results presented in accordance with GAAP.

The non-GAAP adjustments, and our basis for excluding them from non-GAAP financial measures, are outlined below:

Amortization of acquired intangible assets – We have incurred amortization of intangible assets, included in our GAAP financial statements, related to various acquisitions we made. The amount of an acquisition's purchase price allocated to intangible assets and the term of its related amortization can vary significantly and are unique to

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each acquisition; therefore, we exclude amortization of acquired intangible assets from non-GAAP financial measures to provide investors with a consistent basis for comparing pre- and post-acquisition operating results.

Stock-based compensation and amortization of capitalized stock-based compensation – Although stock-based compensation is an important aspect of the com